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Interesting that you didn't include advertising in the mix.

1 year, 2 months ago on Are marketing and PR the same thing?

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I just saw this, Arik. I'm humbled and honored. Thank you! What great company to be in (and I know almost all of them!)

1 year, 7 months ago on Who’s in your Social Media Hall of Fame?

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 @ginidietrich Brooke Gladstone took him at face value on NPR's On the Media. I think those who already have a negative view of PR will just see this as validation for their perspective.

2 years ago on Trust Me I’m Lying: How One Person is Hurting an Entire Industry

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Hey, Gini. I've left this same post over on the Inside PR blog:

 

I'm so glad you covered Ryan Holiday and his book. Since he's getting less critical coverage elsewhere, it's important that we who believe in the ethical side of PR speak up. Neville and I addressed Holiday on FIR #661 on July 23 (http://bit.ly/P13Wci) after I heard him interviewed on the Mixergy podcast (http://mixergy.com/ryan-holiday-interview/) by someone who thought his tactics were great. I also wrote a post suggesting that the ease with which someone like Holiday can manipulate the media gives rise to a greater need for our profession to examine certification (http://bit.ly/M9roSH). But what you may be most interested in is the Google+ Hangout on Air that John Jantsch moderated between Holiday and HARO founder Peter Shankman; David Meerman Scott and I sat in as commentators. You'll find it here: http://youtu.be/s4a0Vrk4ZEw

 

Thanks again for calling this kind of behavior out for what it is.

2 years ago on Trust Me I’m Lying: How One Person is Hurting an Entire Industry

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A great post, Jay, that makes a point a lot of organizations need to understand. The only caveat I would add is that for one type of organization, referrals are the objective. That would be media companies -- online magazines -- which are benefiting from Pinterest-driven traffic more than just about any other type of site. Getting people to a magazine site is just the behavior they want. If they're any good, the site itself will compel some percentage of those visitors to spend some additional time with the content (and, by extension, the ads that support the site). In this instance, eyeballs ARE the point!

2 years, 3 months ago on The Most Overrated Social Media Metric

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 @dough “With all the indicators in terms of buzz, I have a hard time believing it won’t establish itself as a major player,” says Peter Stringer, the Boston Celtics’ director of interactive media. -- From the Mashable piece on sports teams latching onto Pinterest (http://mashable.com/2012/02/24/pinterest-sports/).

 

We don't disagree, Doug. I'm not sure I'd worry about big numbers if the people who are repinning Celtics material are superfans using the service to reinforce their passion and give them something to share with others who might be induced to buy a ticket to a game or a t-shirt. I wrote a post a week or so ago in response to a study that said the top 200 brands on Facebook were generating interaction of less than half of one percent. My headline was something like, "Half of one percent of 28.7 million is still a lot." Have you read "The Science of Social" yet? It's short and it's free on the Lithium.com website. 

2 years, 5 months ago on Shiny Object Syndrome Hurts Us All

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For what it's worth, this is a shiny object:http://www.si.edu/Encyclopedia_SI/nmnh/hope.htmHence, there's nothing wrong with shiny objects, as long as they have value for your (or your organization). As for Pinterest (and the several knockoffs it has inspired, like Gentlemint,  Catalog, WeHeartIt, Jux, Fancy, etc.), these tap into a basic human socialization activity that none of the other longer-term social networks do. Yes, you can share photos in albums on Facebook and Flickr, but these come closer to the clipped items you stick on your refrigerator with a magnet or carry in a small photo album (as my very digitally-savvy wife does in her purse) so she can show pictures of the kids to whomever she encounters. Call it scrapbooking (there's one service that's more into collage), but the appeal is undeniable and not duplicated on other tagging, bookmarking or curation sites. Should every organization use it? Not if they can't figure out how it helps them achieve measurable objectives. But dismissing it could be a mistake, and failing to get creative in your approach to it could be a bigger one. (You HAVE seen the Boston Celtics' pinboards, haven't you, Doug?)

2 years, 5 months ago on Shiny Object Syndrome Hurts Us All

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What started as a comment here turned into a full-blown blog post of my own. I just can't agree with this one, Jay, and several small business Timelines that rock demonstrate that most of these issues just don't matter. My post: http://bit.ly/yr12bv

2 years, 5 months ago on 14 Ways New Facebook Betrays Small Business

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Absolutely consistent with arguments I've been making for years about opening employee access to social channels (at http://stopblocking.org, in addition to other places). I've added this post to my curated collection of material supporting open access (accompanied, of course, by policies and training): http://holtz.com/resources/social-media-access/. As The Altimeter Group study released last year pointed out, employees who know the guardrails and have been trained present less of a risk than those who are barred from participating, and barring participation minimizes the benefits the organization can reap from transparent, ethical access to employees' social graphs.

2 years, 7 months ago on Social Media Success May Depend on HR

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Astounding, indeed. Neville and I reported on these guys when they first made news a few months ago, then did an update on the FIR #625 (from Nov. 14). The more PR people call out this kind of bad behavior in our own ranks, the better our public image will be.

2 years, 9 months ago on Coghlan Consulting Group Run By Morons

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All great advice! I may be a bit off-topic here, but I get concerned when I hear or read the word "audit" bandied about as if it's something anybody can do for themselves. An audit, by definition, is something that's conducted by an objective third party. As I noted to a friend who conducted a webinar on how to do your own communication audit, I'll buy that concept as soon as the IRS lets me audit my own tax returns. Thus, I would argue that all the great points you make are something you want to make sure the auditor you bring in covers -- or incorporate in a self-assessment. But I would caution against undertaking an audit of your own efforts.

3 years, 4 months ago on Five Ways to Create a Social Media Audit

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While I was teaching my workshop on Friday, I was checking Twitter on my phone and noticing a surge of new follows. It wasn't until i got back to the office and my computer that I learned this post was responsible. Thanks for the incredibly kind words, Gini. I've been blushing for hours. It was fantastic to finally sit and talk with you. I'm looking forward to the next opportunity!

3 years, 5 months ago on #FollowFriday: Shel Holtz

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@jennalanger @ginidietrich Hi, Jenna. First, let me state how impressed I am that you're responding to these comments personally, professionally, and in detail. That's outstanding. I do think that somehow labeling the system as "in private beta" would help. I can't speak for others (like Ari Herzog), but I wouldn't have posted my frustration with the system had I known that -- I expect tools in early beta to be less than perfect. Now that I know, however, I'll keep an eye on it. I'll need to visit the website to see if it'll work with Expression Engine; when it's released out of beta, I might just give it a try! (And that's largely due to your personal response.)

3 years, 9 months ago on Moderating Blog Comments

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@ginidietrich @livefyre What a great reply, Gini. I'm sure we'd find that we agree on far more than we disagree -- maybe we should have a drink next time I'm in Chicago and find out. (I'm a big fan of Banderas, by the way.) And for the record, while I'm never troubled by a speaker in jeans, I always wear a suit...but never a tie. I gave them up as a 50th birthday present to myself.

3 years, 9 months ago on Moderating Blog Comments

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@ginidietrich@livefyre@Danny Brown
Oh, Gini, Gini, Gini, (Sounds like a 50's pop tune, doesn't it?) You must have read much more into my comment than I put there. Of course I understood the theme of your post and didn't address moderation/no moderation because our posts have already done that. I was merely responding to the notion that I wasn't being truthful in my post with assurances that I was completely honest about the comment spam I receive. Nor was I drawing a comparison between our blogs. I read your blog regularly and see the volume of comments you attract and am deeply respectful of that. When I suggested spammers may not have found you, I was certainly not suggesting legitimate readers haven't. In any case, I don't spend time comparing my stats to others. I'm happy with my readership and even happier with the listenership to my podcast. Pointing to whose analytics are better is kinda like bragging about whose is bigger...er...well, you get the idea. Danny, your question is a reasonable one, but Akismet is Akismet. It works the same regardless of the platform.

And, Gini, as long as you brought up the moderation/no moderation disagreement (which is not only okay but fun), I'll also note that I travel virtually every week, usually cross-country. That's about 10 hours door-to-door when I can't visit unmoderated comments to weed out the objectionable, the obscene, the heinous and the libelous. That's 10 hours when these comments can be an annoyance to my readers, none of whom have ever said one word since I started blogging about moderation. After all, how many people check to see if their comment was posted, then zoom back to the blog to see if anybody has responded? Most comments (as I once wrote on my blog) are hit-and-run; they drop in, leave a comment, and never come back to that post. So we'll just agree to disagree.

For what it's worth, I had to reload your blog three times in three different browsers in order to leave this comment. It's just my own opinion, of course, but I'd rather be moderated than deal with LifeFyre, if this is typical of the experience.

3 years, 9 months ago on Moderating Blog Comments

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Gosh, Gini, I'm sorry you think my comment spam issue is "baloney" (although I certainly appreciate your using the alternative to BS). From where I sit, calling baloney on me suggests you think I'm lying. I assure you, I'm not. I use Akismet (the same tool used by hundreds of thousands of others); it performs exactly the same on my Expression Engine blog as it would on WordPress or any other platform. According to Wikipedia, it is said to have caught 18.1 billion spam comments and pings as of September 2010. However, it doesn't stop people paid by companies to physically leave a comment, enter the CAPTCHA words, and use techniques specifically designed to defeat comment spam filters. Other bloggers agree -- BL Ochman left a comment to my post indicating she's getting more and more such comment spam. If you're not getting it, bully for you! Maybe the spammers haven't discovered your blog yet. Whatever the reason, I'll be happy to send you screen shots of the collection I find most waiting for me most mornings, in the event that you still think I'm full of baloney. Or maybe I'd be more credible if I changed out of my jeans. ;-)

3 years, 9 months ago on Moderating Blog Comments

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