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Strong communications skills; listening and empathy, balancing creativity w/ measured responses, sticking true to your voice while appealing to a broad base - you're spot on Scott. Right people, right places - can't agree more. The followers in a LinkedIn group may be different than a G+ community or FB page; the team needs to recognize and respect that. Help, caring, enthusiasm - these are human qualities of real people, not automated algorithms. That's being social and as always, aligning your needs to where your audience is social, and with your overall comms and biz goals. FWIW. 

6 days, 7 hours ago on

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It's marketing.. and not. Best example I've got is positioning by.. excellence, by delivering 'more' across the board. Plenty of brands offer rides and theme park experiences, but every time I go to WDW, it's those little extra somethings that make the Disney difference. Part of that ethos is exceeding expectations, dealing w/ issues - they don't want this bad X or that bad Y to mar an otherwise positive vacation experience. Visitors are guests, not customers. Part of it is never resting w/ the status quo, always working to improve. Yes it costs more than other 'comparable' options but then, the value is there.. it's worth it b/c it's Disney. FWIW.

1 week ago on 9 Timeless PR Positioning Strategies

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I remember the Avis story, how funny is that?!

Yesterday there was an on the radio - online reputation management - all about fixing the bad reviews, but no mention of fixing the bad product/services. The kicker: it also talked about using the law to clean these up, as they damage and defame your business. It's a thing now - vendors putting it in contracts that they can sue you if you post a negative (but accurate, provable?) review. *shakeshead*

Brands have to protect themselves, customers aren't always right and expectations are a challenge to manage. No matter how hard you work, you can't be perfect all the time. Negative - true or false or troll - will happen. You have to monitor, you have to train employees, you have to expect it and plan to address it. If only sense were common; people can and will read between the lines. They can tell when an irate customer expected miracles on a nothing budget or when they're misdirecting blame. Build a strong enough community, they'll keep coming, supporting you, even set the record straight. And FWIW, I'm always cautious about anyone w/ nothing but 'perfect' glowing reviews; plenty of things I think are fantabulous but rare is it that I find something perfect without room for improvement.

1 week ago on Seven Tips to Manage the Critics Online

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@Soulati | Hybrid PR Thanks... if I think it'll help, I'll email you. Congrats again.

1 week, 6 days ago on What’s Happening With @Soulati?

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Congrats on the book, the new site .. well done by all. Look forward to more now that you're back. FWIW.

1 week, 6 days ago on What’s Happening With @Soulati?

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Agree there's untapped potential in blogging and really the rest of social media, as brands put emphasis on sales. Like you said Frank, people don't like to be sold or networked; treating SM like a broadcast sales channel is a mistake IMO when it's real power and potential is in connecting and helping people. See so many benefits in CRM and support, HR and of course PR. The other stat that surprises me is the mobile vs. app; tons of surveys about this but IIRC, most users would prefer a well-designed app to a stripped down mobile site -- provided that app has real function and benefits. FWIW.

2 weeks ago on 13 Statistics from an Inc. 500 Social Media Study

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@RobBiesenbach hat tip sir. that's almost exactly how I've approached commenting these many years. Very well said.

2 weeks, 6 days ago on Why We Won’t Shut Off Blog Comments

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"Only if they want to succeed." That's my well DUH response. If you're not digital or are a very small independent (and use an individual account) or are plenty busy, don't need people to find you online - then fine, don't bother. But for most businesses, a big part of success means being findable on Search. Since Search means Google, an active G+ profile is a necessary part of any online identity. FWIW.

6 months, 1 week ago on Should Your Company Be on Google+?

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So much WORD Heather. As I commented on Jason's post, and on Gini Dietrich's follow-up:

1. It's not us it's them; it's the CEO and management who can't, don't, won't measure, won't invest past vanity likes and pointless AVEs. The splash profile piece in X mag or this empty celeb RT, that's all they 'get' so it's what they focus on. 

2. There is so much more to sustainable business success than sales; profit much? What contributes to a company's bottom line - their market cap and value, what Wall Street thinks, what top talent looking for the right gig, what keeps customers loyal in tough times - those X factors like reputation, like relationships. It's how Disney charges what they charge; customers see a 'value' their they don't in other brands, pay a premium for it. 

Working w/ small biz as I have it's hard to show these very important intangibles; they focus on (and pay for) end tactics, nothing else. Plenty of studies show the big $ Super Bowl ads don't sell, don't work - but they're not always "failed" campaigns. I use these examples for something they can "get." No matter recalls and other issues, your F&F and local mechanic still say Toyota's a good brand to buy, has resale value, etc. - that's brand reputation, that's PR. Look at Apple, Disney.. I ask them about their favorite brands and WHY. When my answers are typically the intangible X factors.. that's when I get them to see past ads and clicks and sales, see their are other forces that drive success - and biz comms (PR) is one of them. Doesn't always work, but I'm fighting the good fight. FWIW.

3 weeks, 6 days ago on PR: You Can’t Sell What You Can’t Explain

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