Livefyre Profile

Activity Stream

This is so true, too many people have lists of things they would like to do but haven't committed to them. I like the approach of the will do mindset because I believe that when you decide you will proceed with something, you pick up pace and everything you are doing helps move in that direction. Next thing you know it s done. 


Thank you for the great reminder in this post. :)

1 week, 5 days ago on I Don’t Have A To-Do List, I Have A Will-Do List

Reply

@Sara F. Hawkins Hi Sara, of course I agree with following the law 100% , but honestly following the law does not require 2 to 3 pages of reading for the consumer. If it does, what I am suggesting, is taking the time to find contests that do not require that amount of work. We always have our documents vetted by a lawyer, and this is my strong recommendation to anyone running a contest. However, the point was, if you can do something less elaborate that makes things more fun, and creates the easiest possible entry point for a client or fan, then you will succeed far more than those who decide that they need to run contests that require pages of reading to enter.


The rest of the points come into play here as well. Yes you can give away a car, and believe me thats one cool contest, which does require a lot of legal info/a contract in fact in the "rules"...but is giving a way a car really worth that much more work, would a cool photo contest with no monetary reward not better attract the kind of engagement and sharing you would want? In speaking to organizations who have run contests that are heavy on legal requirement, with high payouts, they have found the actual results to be less successful than the more down to earth, simple contests, that do not actually revolve around monetary gain & such. Sometimes recognition is a huge reward, and this is one aspect I was getting it overall.


Rules are necessary, just chose your contests and rewards in such a way that your participants are actually able to enjoy them and win, in the easiest way possible. 


Never break the law! 


That costs fines and completely goes against what you're trying to accomplish in positive media relations online! 


Just think about if there are some contests that are easier than others to run, and when writing your rules, condense your legal jargon into plain English so people can understand. It's all about communication. If no one reads it or understands it, sure you'll CYA, but the winner may end up complaining - not having understood things, and that makes for a much uglier social experience. Clear and easy - if you can do that while observing the law, and make it part of your consideration when launching something, you'll be really successful.


"Make your contest rules appropriate to your risk and audience"


Hope that clarifies! 



1 week, 6 days ago on 12 Most Strategic Goals for Winning Social Media Contests

Reply

...and I will add, a few hours later, when I can reread my comment, also why tools that allow editing to correct these (my) errors later are much appreciated. Ahem...cough... ;)

2 months, 1 week ago on Does Poor Grammar Affect a Business’s Bottom-Line?

Reply

Excellent article Sam, I almost cringe to out a comment in since I'm on mobile and prone to these typos and autocorrects. However, I'm commenting anyway- the reason is very much the same as the reason I will forgive content producers for not being perfect: we all need editors. As an author, I am sure you did your very best writing your book for example, but I am willing to bet that you went through many edits. You probably were never so grateful for this kind of assistance, I know that when I have the privilege of an editor , I could not be more grateful. So, what of the items that can't go through edits - the tweets, the quick blog posts and of course the text messages? I would much rather read good content with ideas I can understand and use, than mediocre content from stern grammar policemen. The world has become to wide to limit contet to those who can only work with editors - so for value, I'm willing to read between the typos (as long as they are reasonable). Send me a letter or print with typos and I will not be impressed, but for the most part I can respect that we are all human. It helps to use tools and try and take our time. For example I love Grammarly for doing a quick review - and it's also fantastic for identifying plaigiarism (when you're reviewing content of others). I think the bottom line is what is reasonably expected for each form of communication, this is the new norm, and I am okay with that. At least until every thought leader out there or community manager is given the privilege of an editor. Talent isn't perfect everywhere, it just has to hit the Mark where it matters.

2 months, 1 week ago on Does Poor Grammar Affect a Business’s Bottom-Line?

Reply

@MartinGBEdwards thats an extremely interesting commentary. I love these varied points of view... 

If this insight helps, I believe the brands who are smallest and who live by the principles that they were founded by have the largest opportunity. Although their desire to be more "corporate" may cause some internal confusion, the reality remains that it is just this type of company who has "humans" working for them. 

The reason I say this, is because these "humans" are not working on scripts, do not yet have a billion protocols, and although they must manage themselves with procedures and regulations, they may work on culture to keep to their roots. These are the places where human conversations are still being heard, where clients get a real person who is still empowered to make decisions, and is not stripped of their humanity by red tape and layers of management. 

In my experience - it is truly the smaller to mid sized businesses who will get it, if they stop being afraid that they are too small, and too much at risk. They just have to be themselves, I've seen it, and its quite something. :)

2 months, 3 weeks ago on We Don’t Need to Be More Human – We Just Need to Be People

Reply
Then again, looking a little bit deeper into one of the larger Tribes I was part of, it perhaps shouldn’t come as a surprise that the level of traffic provided by Triberr was so low.

I wantd to let you knwo that using a particular tool I recently was doing a comparison of sources of shares. In comparing my account to another person's account, I found mine had 24% of shares from Triberr and the other account had 48% - quite a high number. Of course size of community comes into play, and how active you are in other social sharing activities...but I think the way you manage your community is more important in an analysis of the usefulness of tools such as Triberr. My experiences with Triberr have been quite favorable... This is a perfect use of a Sidenotes, and a perfect post (full of rich varied content) to use it in... Couldn't resist.

3 months ago on Why Our User Experience Should Be Determined by Data

Reply
Actually, that’s a little bit of a misnomer, since Livefyre Sidenotes isn’t really a blog comment solution – more an enhancement to any content on the web today.

This is similar to the markerly plugin, which also used to send back stats on the most copied and shared segments... I like that feature. I wonder if this effects pagespeed. That is one issue I have seen in the past with this type of plugin.

3 months ago on An Introduction to Livefyre Sidenotes and Complementing Our Conversations Here

Reply

@Danny Brown @ginidietrichI think that the best solution would be for Livefyre to allow the writer of the post to specify where (if anywhere) he would like the commenting to appear) not everywhere. 

Like Gini said, its discombobulated - and as the author, following all these conversations although interesting - doesn't work for a normal business reader, we don't have time to do all this digging. For a science journal, or reference blogs where people want to start to engage in community conversations to deep DEEP levels, then its very cool. 

So this is why I think the proper design would let the author select some points of interaction, not every paragraph. You know, make it an option, not an all or nothing format.

From the writer's perspective, I think its always nice to see a bunch of feedback, but will readers really get that much more out of it? I guess it depends on the quality of community participating. And how smoothly the read goes, given these comment sidelives of the blog. 

I say Side Life because it is a whole other mindset, normally your process is read, then think. This is like read, jump at a question or comment, then get sidetracked with what other people said, then respond ...THEN maybe continue reading.

On stats it may make people stay longer, but what in the end is coming of it all. Whats this evolving into? So many questions.

If I stop to read all the comments, I might not have the time or focus to read the whole blog... 

Look forward to seeing what happens with this on your blog :)

3 months ago on An Introduction to Livefyre Sidenotes and Complementing Our Conversations Here

Reply
They also feel incredibly natural to anyone that’s read anything, ever. That’s not an overstatement – think of the little notes you make on Post-Its on your favourite books; or annotations on college papers; or side comments on a suitably-equipped eReader for further research/discussion later on.

This system is very much like Medium. It makes the read interesting if you have the time to dive into the added content of the community. Certainly a richer experience. To answer your question, I would not put a comment like "discuss" the automatic comment icon after each paragraph implies it. I think it will roll out naturally. Curiosity will drive users to click it and then discover a whole new side of the post to join in on!

3 months ago on An Introduction to Livefyre Sidenotes and Complementing Our Conversations Here

Reply

@CASUDI Thank you so much. I think the conversation that happens from the post is so interesting. I really appreciate you adding your thoughts and taking the time :) I think a lot of the things we do well are intuitive, in design you surely have this - but there is value in recognizing our originality as a very important part of who we are and how it enables us to achieve things in a special way - I think its a critical element to true leadership. :)

4 months, 2 weeks ago on Succeeding Through The Challenges Of Originality In Leadership

Reply

@AlaskaChickBlog My organization celebrates 90 years this year. Originality, and flexibility is what has kept us agile and able to continue to serve our clients needs as the environment changes. For employees and for the team, coming up with new ways to look at things and being open to team collaboration on changes of direction has been key, in my opinion. Its something I value greatly. In the short term, its a lot easier to stick to the tried and true, but I think if you look long term, which is where leaders have to set their sights, there is too much change to reply on just doing the minimum. That's the difference, I think between a business that succeeds and one that has to sell out. Both in for profit and non profit sectors, this originality and ability becomes key - you're an inspiration, and lets face it trying new things is scary at first, but at this point, Im used to seeing and doing things differently to successful results, and after a while you start to build that confidence and realize you're adding true value. That's something you can bank on, for today and the future :) Scary is good! :)

4 months, 3 weeks ago on Succeeding Through The Challenges Of Originality In Leadership

Reply

@davidallenspell I am glad to hear this David. I truly believe that we each have somethign special to contribute, in fact if I am working somewhere where what I do can be duplicated, I almost feel as though Ive done my job, laid the groundwork, and its time to move on. Its important to be valued for each one's special qualities and insights. For leaders, its crucial to see things in a different way. We don't always have to agree, but to grow together using this special insight and ability. Thank you so much for your comment, keep doing what youre doing, it makes all the difference! 


4 months, 3 weeks ago on Succeeding Through The Challenges Of Originality In Leadership

Reply

@AlaskaChickBlog Beautifully said Amber-Lee. Thank you for this comment and for adding to my post. With passion we never give up, no matter the circumstance and we move through challenges and obstacles supported by the energy of the heart. <3

5 months, 2 weeks ago on The Essential Elements of Passion in Leadership

Reply

@CASUDI thank you Caroline! :) I had never thought of passion like this before writing this post, in a way I took it for granted. When I dug into the idea of what makes me passionate and how this works for my team and with the people around me, I realized it is not just something that one is or has, its something we work for. There is nothing more rewarding that working with passion, and indeed, money is nice, we all need it, but without passion, its not really enough. :)

5 months, 2 weeks ago on The Essential Elements of Passion in Leadership

Reply

Hey Chip! I love this, you couldnt be more on point with this. Its the energy we put into teams that really produces results, and whats really nice about that is when a team is well established, and they share the energy, when anyone goes "down" there is always a force to lift them up...even leaders get zapped sometimes and the team is what drives them forward. I love this post! :)

5 months, 2 weeks ago on Put Your Whole Self In To Be A Leader

Reply

@AlaskaChickBlogYour team is quite lucky to have you, somehow I think youve underestimated the fortune they have in getting to work with you. Believe me, we all get frustrated, and don't forget, it's equally as important to maintain your values and standards, just because of someones age, does not mean you let things slide. You offer excellent opportunities where you are, people should be more grateful and step up to do the job properly, especially in your field! :) Not letting people get away with stuff because of their age is just as important - we've got a real balancing act on our hands! 

5 months, 4 weeks ago on We have a job to do: Propaganda, Leaders, GenY et al

Reply

@CASUDI I love that!!! :) 

6 months ago on Do You Know Why You Lead?

Reply

I lead because I want to create positive change and contribute. I like to create environments where people who once hated their jobs may love them. I lead because I want people to get value from products and service, and feel supported and helped. I lead to counter all the negativity about business and management, and show there is a way to do things together and provide that value to employees and consumers. 


I love this question, early on, when I wondered what to do with my career, the answer was simple to me, and Ive gone about everything with these goals in place, in a nutshell, I like to make people happy - how its worked out is leadership and activism. I wonder how many people have totally slanted answers to why they lead, like more money, or prestige. Probably far more than we think. Thnk you for this insightful post :)

6 months ago on Do You Know Why You Lead?

Reply

@AlaskaChickBlogYou wouldn't be the first person to grimace at some of the actions seen by employees or team members, but if you really think about it we see these same types of things in other generations as well. We just are more "used" to them. Believe me, especially given my very conscious efforts to manage by strengths, there have been times when I have had a one on one discussion with GenY's about certain issues and been flabbergasted by what they express as their views, or motivations. When this happens I take a step back and a deep breath and I inquire further, then I try really hard to explain as best as I can how other people view the behavior, or why the actions need to be adjusted, and believe it or not , usually they get it and then they perform. Not everyone likes to face this kind of challenge, and believe me, it takes a lot of energy, but the extra communication and effort really works out in the long run. I think often their laziness, is a lack of understanding, and the gimme attitude is not that different from anyone else in any age group - they just express it differently perhaps, or seem brighter and shinier - I work with people in all age groups and every single one of them has their issues, and in the end, when I dig to the roots, its all about respect, and feeling appreciated and n the loop, the main difference is the "older" generations bite their tongues and fester... the younger ones pour it all out and "act up"...its all the same problem. A lot of it comes with time, something they haven't had yet, and experience, something they seek. Whether they know it or not is not the issue - we have to remember we are there to teach, mentor, lead...we cant do that if we go into things thinking, oh no its GenY. Forget about the generation and just deal with the person, regardless of age, and if they happen to be lazy, then by gosh, there are a lot of GenX , or boomers who are lazy... they just wouldn't usually cross your path perhaps (since you're in an energetic field - if you will) - There are plenty of people sitting around just buying time to retirement, or older people who think they know everything...I'm sure you've met many, as have I...Theres a lot to learn from this "GENY" group and I personally love working with them as much as the rest of my teams, its just a matter of counting to ten and thinking about whats really going on and then patiently leading the way. Its a challenge, and in my opinion, it does pay off, but it requires taking the approach that its not about an entire generation, it's about the one on one. :)


Thank you so much for the comment Amber-Lee, I really appreciate the discussion. Sorry for the delayed reply, but when I saw your question, I really wanted to take the time to answer your question with some thought  :)  We definitely have our work cut out for us, but that's what makes leadership rewarding, don't you think?


6 months ago on We have a job to do: Propaganda, Leaders, GenY et al

Reply

@Jen Olney @OlivierCompagneI do not think this would work in all organizations, and in government- forget it... too many people are too habituated to structure. The only way this can work is with constant effort on the part of management reinforcing the differences and how this structure aligns with values. If everybody understands what their job is, the mission of the company and what their particular goals are, then this can work. 

When titles aren't tied to pay scale, and performance & contribution are instead, it actually creates -in some businesses - a focus on the right things rather than just the title. The whole aspect of people  feeling valued (or undervalued by lack of) title takes away some pressures in a way. But again it only works when everyone is on the same page. Many new professionals will join firms for titles as well as work... what happens there? There's a huge education that must go on. 

The outside world however will have a hard time understanding what people do without titles, and recognition by others in the general population for ones accomplishments becomes very difficult as well. As an example, I think what Medium is doing is perfect, and although people where I work have titles, this is actually due to regulated industry standards, we do not limit them by their titles - they are all team members and each has their own contributions ad roles they take as they are able (based on strengths). The constants are the tools used to measure and recognize performance. 

I would think that it is people who are in less "professional" positions who would enjoy this kind of system the most. If we base it just on having a title or not - if we base it on the philosophy behind it, I find it to be a wonderful way, in an ideal world... so the question is - is the company able to put the effort in to run an ideal workplace. Thats where the work comes in - a lot of it.

 

6 months, 3 weeks ago on Holacracy – The Title For A Title Less World

Reply

@AlaskaChickBlogI think what makes it hard is that going this route definitely requires a lot more attention than regular business models, in that human beings are constantly changing, and so you have to be constantly changing and adapting with them. If there is not a solid procedural base, and clearly - VERY clearly identified vision, then things can go off the rails. The other problem that I have seen is the inequity that can happen when others in the organization take more traditional approaches. I think that many small businesses would actually see this approach as something on big corporations can do, when in fact the most successful models would occur - in my opinion - when this starts in a small company and grows as the company grows. Its like finding a soul in your business - you almost have to fight every day to keep it :) However, i think it is worth it if you can get the right people in place to do it :) Everyone has value, and everyone can deliver very special attributes to an organization we need to find ways to harmoniously work that :) Thank you so much for your comment!

6 months, 3 weeks ago on Holacracy – The Title For A Title Less World

Reply

Sabrina, This highlights one of the biggest boundaries that businesses have in finding good middle ground for compromise in flexibility. Too often an HR department will set some flexible rules and think the employer's part of flexibility is met, but it extends far beyond that - it's about the culture and mindset of the management team, as well as for the employees. What is interesting is that often when flexibility is worked into the official management strategy, employees take it for granted after 18 months or so... I find to make flexibility work management must spend time reinforcing flexibility and also helping employees find ways to be flexible as well. There is a lot to be said for a continuous eye on how everything is doing and how various attributes are being perceived and reinforcing these in employee reviews, the culture statement of the employees and support to help people transition and be adaptable on BOTH sides. Excellent post and concepts to start off the new year! Thank you!

6 months, 3 weeks ago on One Word For 2014: Flexibility

Reply

Great post Dino. I checked out your page views because my first question would be over time if the upworthy titles would result in more clicks through via search engines. I see that you were measuring the shortened urls, so they are definitely stemming from shares. (I realize it seems silly for me to check this, but I felt it was important). This brings me to my next point, over time it would be interesting to look at the performance of these titles in search engine queries. Upworthy speaks to the general public, where as you have an already segmented profile of reader (if you will) via Triberr. Although Triberr does have an enormous sampling of the population with its diversity of subject matter/interest ranges, these are still people in general who are using Triberr because they have heard about it somehow, which means they are already not in the general population but a population of more advanced internet marketing types (regardless of subject that they specialize in). 


This being said, people know you don't write about nonsense. I think it is also safe to say that you do "over the top" really well, because when someone visits your blog, they are guaranteed to find good information - so if you started naming posts absurd things, simply because we know you always provide value, we will likely click through. If you write a more standard or boring headline, we may not jump to view it - but when you write something that blasts us we do. So I think the real general rule will come when there has been some time to verify how click through rate from search engines works on these titles vs. others. 


If someone starts off using these types of titles and doesn't have the knowledge or the wow factor to deliver, they may risk being labelled as one of those "headline writers" who you and I and many people stay away from. Would it perhaps be safe to say that it is a good idea to either come up with content that seriously delivers on what's behind the crazy title - or stick to good content to establish an audience with straight forward titling until such time that it is clear that a good blog base & reputation has been established?


I would definitely use these kinds of titles if the content of my article is going to deliver, because there is no problem with them in that sense. The problem is when delivery is poor or the person is not knowledgeable enough , or does not have the experience or presence online yet to give confidence to the viewer that what they will get is value. If i click through on one of these once or twice and don't get what was promised, I kind of stay away from further posts. There is too much information out there and too many interesting articles to read daily to spend my time on things that have in the past been hit and miss.


What do you think of that? Is it about establishing rapport and quality first, then entertainment as appropriate? 


Your data is indicative enough to support doing the teasing and shocking headlines, but I'd say you better deliver - or you may risk your credibility. :)


Great thoughts to start the day! Thank you Dino! :)


6 months, 3 weeks ago on Will @upworthy type headline work for you? A startling conclusion.

Reply

Dear Daniel,

Happy New Year! Indeed, this is a time of year where we hear far too much about resolutions- only to see them not carried out. I think your approach is right on, and a very helpful way to look at things, take stock and make decisions that help you move your life and goals forward - and if you don't have enough goals, or maybe see the error (or perhaps misdirection) in previous goals, why not use this time with a few days off of work and cherished time with friends and family, to really look at this and see where you want to be. There is probably no coincidence in the concept that New Years resolutions take place after a friend and family filled time - one of the few times, aside from weddings and funerals where we tend to have the greatest contact with those we care about. All these things help us, time off, being surrounded by people we love, or perhaps even realizing that what we are surrounded with is not quite what we wanted... New Years is a wonderful time of year for the hope it brings and the clarity for most people that happens - so here is to wishing everyone the clarity that happens at that magical time of year actually sticks, and carries through the year through - then they really will no longer be resolutions but rather a new way of life to what we really wanted. Thank you for your insightful post!

6 months, 3 weeks ago on Happy 2014: Be Humble and Go Forward

Reply

@samfiorella@MilaspageInteresting, so then let me ask you this, if Forbes had used listly, (to do the same thing) noting that Listly would have automatically pulled in the Twitter accounts and "bios" - would this list have been saved the criticism? 

On another note, there is also something to be said for the blog editors who allow lists like this to run.  I am sure that if you or I got this list - we would likely write back and explain, thanks for the list, but we are going to need the related links. Its bad customer service to make people look things up when technology provides ways for the links to be provided, especially when it is the norm in the field/format.


I think this speaks worse of Forbes than anything else, their standards aren't really there, are they?

7 months ago on Lazy Content Marketing Or How Not To Write a List Post

Reply

@samfiorella@gonzogonzoIt is also interesting to note the advice of Listly's Nick Kellet, where he suggests leaving important people out of the list or items as an engagement strategy. This strategy however would only work with Listly, I think - and risks leaving the list maker to look ill informed, lazy, offending others or even risks taking the person's creditability away...if the purpose is not outlined properly. A list is only ever as good as the effort put into it.



..and a lazy marketer - or journalist, or anyone who just wants to throw something together to get i out there, vs providing insight or quality, is going to have similar results. If these lazy people make top lists, I would say there is probably a lot more involved and the reason they are there is not for their content creation...perhaps other factors...


7 months ago on Lazy Content Marketing Or How Not To Write a List Post

Reply

Great post Dino, writing from many sides of events and speaking I am going to say that you've hit a lot of the valuable aspects. One facet not to be overlooked however is the importance of documenting your speaking in a non speaker environment like Linked in, for a great example, check what Christopher Penn has done on his linked in, it's an approach we tend to take for granted, and one I've put on my agenda to get up to speed with in the coming weeks.

We often focus on these larger well promoted events, however there is great value in smaller events where there are only a few speakers also. a balanced mix between local business events - like business bureaus or industry specific events provide a lot of opportunity - you get access to a lot more direct interaction and get a chance to have those more interactive sessions where learning is truly a two way street. Then heading to larger events you can really add value by having that insight you spoke of.

Look forward to seeing you again soon and thanks for this excellent article! It draws a very important focus to the fact that in today's environment speaking is not about beig a mega star who just shows up and then runs out after the lights are dimmed, but rather is there over the course of the planning to generate the energy and build up. :)

Oh, one other thing- for smaller events, I tend to look up all the attendees and adjust my presentation to those who will be there, I reach out in advance - connect on twitter or linked in and just make them feel welcomed and also research how I can give THEM the most value... I think this makes for a way better experience. After all, if you're speaking isn't that just like being a host- you want everyone to feel welcomed, and walk away with something special. Don't speak just to speak, speak to give value.

7 months, 1 week ago on 5 Qualities Event Organizers Demand from Speakers

Reply

@AlaskaChickBlog Thank you! I am so glad it is of value. I can say that before I looked at things this way, I would try and be "nice" and respond immediately, and I considered this a good thing, to be politely responsive, but eventually over time I have realized that actions are not taken normally when dealing with unhealthy leaders, and so it becomes critical to demonstrate very structured and deliberate behavior in order to succeed in these kinds of environments. It would be nice to never have to deal with these kinds of situations, but the reality is, no matter where you go, there will always be someone or many someones who will have difficult behaviors, if these circumstances or people aren't managed properly, the situations they create grow and your ability to deliver growth or innovation becomes very limited. If you let these people or circumstances get the best of you or take you off guard, your entire foundation for leadership can be shaken...With patience and a strategic approach, nothing stands in your way :) 

7 months, 3 weeks ago on Opposition At The Leaders Table: 5 Tips to Build Your Strategy To Lead In Opposition

Reply

@AlaskaChickBlog I think your advice is very much at the core of a strong culture and a great company to work with, I love the term you have chosen, the heart of the company - this is very much what makes great companies great -  a heart/culture. 

The other key you mention is the purpose of the company, a team can not rally around a cause, a project or anything if they do not see a purpose, when the purpose of the company - the vision - is clear to the team and leaders, then it is easy to stay on track and easy to grow in healthy environments. 

Weak leaders do not survive in balanced companies, just as often, unfortunately, truly great leaders do not put up with problematic leadership either... It benefits us all to ensure strong leadership, strong vision and a healthy culture in order to attract and retain positive forces in business.

Thank you so much for your comment, I love how you put this, and yes- to answer your question, my follow up post to this article actually addresses how to deal with unhealthy leaders and opposition - because sometimes the projects and the vision you are working on are worth the minor inconveniences - or sometimes you can not avoid it. It's best to be prepared to respond with healthy leader behaviors ;) After all, leadership is about leading through the good and the bad :)

7 months, 3 weeks ago on Opposition at The Leaders Table: 5 Traits of Unhealthy Leadership

Reply

@SteveWellmeier Ha, thank you Steve! Good insight there :) I think the most complicated part for people dealing with unhealthy leaders is that it is not always evident at first. These people didn't get into leadership positions by being out of control 24-7 - generally they have some very interesting behaviors that most people don't complain about as well - such as buying gifts (bribes) - they know how to manipulate situations, they have a charming side as well. It's usually over time that one can start to see these things and realize they are not one-off situations. Unfortunately, if people have dug their heels in deep enough in an organization and still behave this way and maintain their positions, there is a good chance the behavior is not evident enough to others who could control it, or eliminate it..so this is where learning how to identify and then navigate these behaviors becomes really important. No matter where you are in life, you'll find these people somewhere. I think if we conduct ourselves to our own standards and not allow ourselves to be drawn into the behaviors, we can protect the integrity of our own teams and be strong leaders for the piece of the puzzle we are responsible for! Thank you so much for taking the time to comment, I apologize for the delayed reply, I faced an issue with my commenting when this post first came out - thanks for hanging in for my response!

7 months, 3 weeks ago on Opposition at The Leaders Table: 5 Traits of Unhealthy Leadership

Reply

Oh my goodness, now that I have a wonderful little Jack Russell in my family I cant believe this breed didn't make the list! ;) They are so friendly, have so much energy and just want to be a part of everything. On the downside though, I do know that these little dogs if not exercised, socialized or cared for enough can be quite a challenge. So Ill forgive you Lewis, for not including Jack Russells, since they are high maintenance, but will note that if the time and effort is given to them, wow, what incredible members of the family they become!  

Too many people get a pet for the family and don't give enough attention ten have to abandon the dogs or create unhealthy pets (psychologically) the bottom line is pets are as challenging and require as much dedication as children do, so to have the best family dog, regardless of the breed, what you really need is a lot of love, attention and care and the experience will be rewarding all around!

8 months, 2 weeks ago on 12 Most Family Friendly Dogs

Reply

@dbvickery Hey Brian! Did you ever make a decision on that migration?

8 months, 3 weeks ago on 12 Most Overlooked Blog “Set Up” Basics You’re Probably Guilty Of

Reply

@JuliaHuprich Thank you Julia! It is a lot to keep up with, but it helps to have a checklist and go over it once in a while or use it as the wishlist of things to take care of for a rainy day :)

8 months, 3 weeks ago on 12 Most Overlooked Blog “Set Up” Basics You’re Probably Guilty Of

Reply

@TheFortonGroup That is a great added tip, I have not yet explored Vimeo, but this is definitely one to check out for my next post! :) Thank you so much!

8 months, 3 weeks ago on 12 Most Overlooked Blog “Set Up” Basics You’re Probably Guilty Of

Reply

@Pamojamo Looks like there is some extra html code in the links causing them not to connect, thank you so much for letting me know, Ill let the 12MOST team know about it and we will get a fix up! Here are the two links: 

http:/codex.wordpress.org/Creating_a_Favicon

and  http:/www.favicon.cc/   

8 months, 3 weeks ago on 12 Most Overlooked Blog “Set Up” Basics You’re Probably Guilty Of

Reply

@Etela thank you Etela! Your comments are extrmely insightful and add to the detail here, your SEO expertise is well appreciated!  Also, thank you so much for giving the link to the DragonSearch plugin. Its a very useful tool!

8 months, 3 weeks ago on 12 Most Overlooked Blog “Set Up” Basics You’re Probably Guilty Of

Reply

All these points are right on Brad! Definitely a fantastic guideline for anyone leading people to follow. My personal favorite is the not hesitating to fire the person, it sounds rough, but when the person is not healthy for the organization, this quality becomes so important to protect the environment and culture of the company. thank you for this great post!

8 months, 4 weeks ago on 12 Most Appealing Boss Behaviors

Reply

Your choice of words here is perfect, the world opening up to be bright and special. We never know how much potential we have to contribute to the world until we get out there, in turn, we also connect and our lives truly are richer. Thank you so much for taking the time to comment, I am grateful to have met you through #Bealeader as well! It's a special time in the world - it's good to be a part of it!

9 months, 2 weeks ago on The Picture Frame That Moves and Gives Back: Part II

Reply

What a beautiful message Sam, the feeling is mutual. I was so happy to see this post run on our Canadian Thanksgiving weekend because I will never be able to express enough the gratitude I feel for all these wonderful friends that we have met through our online networks. That picture represented a great deal to me as well, as you so eloquently and far better than I could, expressed in your comment. I can never be thankful enough for all the experiences, knowledge, support, laugher that these new forms of online communication have facilitated - when I got my picture frame and found myself including all these photos - I did so in deep gratitude for the true friendships that have formed and grown. Thank you so much for everything and also for taking the time to comment. I am blessed , I hope others read this and realize it really is about human connections - together there is nothing we can't accomplish.

9 months, 2 weeks ago on The Picture Frame That Moves and Gives Back: Part II

Reply

Thanks for this great post Amy, I think the ability for people to use fonts combined with the pressure to be authentic and lighthearted has pushed people beyond their common sense sometimes. We need to think in terms of consistency and overall appeal, and the truth of the matter is you can wow people with your cool looking font, or how about drawing the attention away from the font by not making it distracting - keeping it discreet and easy to read so people can focus on your content - thats where it's really at. I love the way you compared the concept of people using a font for the same effect as a logo - you hit it right on there - it's not your brand logo - make it easy and keep it less distracting.

9 months, 2 weeks ago on 12 Most Overused Fonts that Can Damage Your Brand Image

Reply

Are people too connected to their mobile devices? Everyone loves to complain about the person using their cell while out to dinner etc, but the truth is the answer to that question is none of our business- as a marketer the answer is - for better or for worse, people are on their devices because it's easy, and entertaining, and connects people to others - so as a business our only concern is being there for them too and as you pointed out, how about making things as easy for our customers and prospects on their terms and where they need us. If that's in the bathroom, then that's their business - our business is delivering value.

9 months, 2 weeks ago on You’re Reading This While on the Toilet Aren’t You?

Reply

Ric, you bring up such wonderful points here! Oftentimes instead of trying to be productive and find solutions people fall into a complaining slump. I call it a slump because that's exactly what is it complaining solves nothing - however in the role of leader the initial behaviour of complaining can lead a leader to truly dig up the issues- and as you say, things have to move to greater more productive stages- naturally from complaining we can focus on listening and then of course solutions. The culture in an organization relies so much on the leadership allowing people to move beyond the helpless roles, to roles that explore - and conceive of new ideas.

You bring up another crucial point about leadership that is weak - constantly changing their mind - inconsistencies. I have found this is one of the major issues in dysfunctional cultures. Leaders have to listen, make informed decisions and follow through - it's okay to change your mind, but when you do you better show that this is based on analysis and reflection. Leaders make mistakes, smart leaders listen to their team to adjust for the greater good or to make improvements but in the end much of this all is about listening and showing solid response. A great read, thank you for this post - wonderful!

9 months, 2 weeks ago on You’re Ok, Now Let’s Make A Change

Reply

@CASUDI Your mother's table sounds beautiful, i think it is so important to surround oneself with all the positive forces in our lives - today we do have a much easier time reaching out and supporting each other or keeping up - but it sounds like your mother had things right even without all the internet tools :) Very beautiful story, I can only imagine it must have been incredible to sit and look at the collection on her table, many smiles there for sure. Thank you so much for taking the time to add to the story, have an amazing day!

9 months, 2 weeks ago on Enrich Your Life – Staying Offline Off Social Networks Will Hurt You : Part I

Reply

@StephanieFrasco Very true Stephanie, thats why community is so amazing, we sometimes all live similar experiences, but by sharing our thoughts, can get so much more out of things. thank you so much for commenting :) Im happy this added a new dimension for you! 

You might also enjoy a really good post by @Dannybrown , where he reviewed the thoughts behind his site redesign here: http://dannybrown.me/2013/08/13/why-our-user-experience-should-be-determined-by-data/ 

Have an amazing day! :) & thanks again!

9 months, 3 weeks ago on Why “Most Linked Content” May Be More Important Than “Click Through Rate”

Reply

@RyanKBiddulph Thank you so much Ryan! It's funny because I think that as we use the networks more we start to forget about how important the hashtags are - not using them really diminishes the reach of a message. I like what you are saying here about being generous in using them, it's true that we shouldn't be so shy. 

In fact there is not much to lose with sending out a post a few times, with a few different hashtags to see the results. It makes it easier for others to see what the post is about but also increases potential reach with each hashtag applied. 

I am guilty of forgetting about all the amazing hashtag communities I belong to sometimes and not posting with all the related tags. I definitely see a difference when I post with more tags vs. when I just use one or two. I have to remind myself of this often!

Great tip & reminder, thank you again for taking the time to stop in and add this. Im happy to see you!

9 months, 3 weeks ago on Using Hashtags in Social Media is Good for Your Business : A How To Guide

Reply

@StephanieFrasco I totally agreee, there is a real balance to be had between the actual item title, or text you want to write, or idea you want to share, and the hashtags. You dont want there to be so many hashtags that no one can decipher what youre talking about or trying to share or say.

 However I will agree with @RyanKBiddulph Ryan above in that, if you can fit in the title of your article, or your quote, or whatever the main message is clearly, then hashtag away into various communities! 

I will often send a post out 2 or 3 times, but change the hashtags in the message to reach different audiences. One example coudl be for Customer service, I might use #CEX #Custserv  then I might redo the same post but gear it to leadership communities, or marketing communities, to keep the post consistent with the community I am going to try and reach I will group together the relevant hashtags.

Thank you so much for taking the time to share your thoughts here and continuing the conversation, I really appreciate it!! Have an amazing day!

9 months, 3 weeks ago on Using Hashtags in Social Media is Good for Your Business : A How To Guide

Reply

@LittleAnimation Its amazing how many people and how many communities have opened up by following hashtags. #Usguys is a great example! I am blessed by all the brilliant minds I have had the chance to dialogue with and meet - from hashtag to in real life relationships. You are one of them, thank you so much!

9 months, 3 weeks ago on Using Hashtags in Social Media is Good for Your Business : A How To Guide

Reply

 Interesting approach Sam, and as Linked In starts to develop to a point where even the "non social" understand the interactions, it becomes more important to form a strategy. 


I agree that it makes no sense in creating a connection with people who you can not vouch for. In the early days of Linked In, before the functions we know today were realized, networks or connections may have been formed, that at the time ,were not as important to screen. However as the network is developing more consideration has to go into each individuals perspective on how THEY are going to be using Linked In.

You mention visibility above, and I think that is one important tool to deciding who you must connect with. Those who would argue they want to connect with people to grow their networks, should be posting their activity visibly to all...

Another approach may be posting some activity solely to their own network (people who are connected) - if that is the approach - and one might seek to do this to avoid competitors from seeing ALL their activity - then it is more important to have connections with the people you want to share with. It could almost work like a gateway. 

As we discuss these strategies, far too often we get lost in the marketers perspective, the issues that touch on marketing and the issues that come to us as marketing professionals. We must keep an open mind to think also about the functions for people who are not using networks to broadcast and share large ideas. There are those out there who are purely consumers, or who share items but want to keep their circles discreet. 


The more recent Linked In updates make Linked In function very much like a Facebook. The best way they can evolve to make these various roles people have online to to create subscribe features for all users, then users would not feel obliged to accept connections from their fans, and could manage this in a more productive way. Think Facebook evolutions (lists, subscribers, etc)


Looking toward the future, I agree that people need to think about what it means to THEM to have connections. How this appears to others, and what their true goals are on Linked In. 

Lets not forget that as evolved as we in the 1-5% are, as we upload our videos and slideshares and make full use of the site, the other 95% who have access to us may be collectives that have hardly grasped a profile picture.... its all about where you are at, and what you're trying to accomplish. 


So, we can either start a massive clean up of our contacts and decide who we want to leave in there (example: only people we recommend, only people we have worked with, people we think are cool??) and perhaps forma  statement in our summaries explaining how we ourselves use Linked In. Maybe that's the best solution moving forward at this time, after all you may use it one way, I guarantee others will use it differently...we can't all be mind readers. :) The only standard right now is constant change.

11 months, 1 week ago on The Sanctity of LinkedIn Contacts

Reply

Susan, I am so very honoured to be included in this list of awesome posts by some wonderful 12Most authors. Thank you so much! I am glad that post resonated with you. Thank *you* for all of your wonderful contributions in this community as well. One of the most incredible things about 12Most is the diversity and wealth of knowledge that is shared, and the collaborations and development that come from this rich writing group!

1 year, 1 month ago on 12 Most Lasting Lessons I Learned from Other 12 Most Writers

Reply

Great advice! Far too many marketing depts rely on generic content or think that the way to show presence is by reprinting - sharing info etc. They put more value on having something "there" then tailoring and creative the feel of the company, what I like to call the soul in the brand...Great work on this post, well said.

1 year, 1 month ago on How to Use Media to Market Your Business

Reply