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Learn from your mistakes. Be honest with yourself. Live up to your highest expectations of yourself.

Is there better medicine? 

2 days, 13 hours ago on Tips For #ReturnOnOptimism

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I love it when you teach.

2 days, 19 hours ago on Misanthropy Is An Under Appreciated Art

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That's awesome you are keeping it fun!

5 days, 1 hour ago on Into The Audio Book Business

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@dinodogan Glad you could recover the domain and continue rocking the internets.

1 month, 1 week ago on From his darkest hour and his biggest professional failure, he pulled out this lesson

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What's up with the lack of comments?!

1 month, 1 week ago on From his darkest hour and his biggest professional failure, he pulled out this lesson

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@Soulati | Hybrid PR @KDillabough


There was always hope in collaboration. But too often vanity gets in the way of deep and enduring collaborations.

1 month, 2 weeks ago on Should Bloggers Write With Key Words?

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Blogging for dollars is a seemingly sisyphean task - especially if a blog gets under a 1M visitors per month. I admire your courage and tenacity, Jayme.

Even 1M views in themselves don't pay the bills, because, ultimately, it's the client work that brings the pay checks, big paypal payments and bank transfers.

At its best, blogging is a labor of love. Keyword stuffing, reciprocal commenting and back link chores kills the buzz like nothing else. Perhaps, partly, because the value of such comes out to about a penny on the dollar for endless hours - if we are lucky.

Myself, I often consider the Jack B's advice regarding blogging - just write.

1 month, 2 weeks ago on Should Bloggers Write With Key Words?

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This is awesome.

1 month, 2 weeks ago on Celebrating Digital Birthdays With Milaap #Milaap4Hope

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The endeavor to commodify the human person continues in aggressive leaps and bounds via the internets. Sure, advertising and marketing is all about manipulating our emotions, thoughts and purchases. Herbert Marcuse warned the neo-marxist pseudo-intellectuals about such ambitions. Long ago. And Smith, Adam Smith, never imagined such depravity. In his utopia, the capitalist was a man of honor and unconquered virtue.

Facebook has deceived us.  And so-called scientific language like "experiment" is no excuse for it's manipulation of our information for it's own evil purposes. Facebook is no longer credible, reliable or secure as a platform for public communication and interaction. But that doesn't mean Facebook is dead or irrelevant. It doesn't mean people will stop using it. But it does mean that the C-Suite of Facebook are all scum bags.

Stan Faryna

1 month, 2 weeks ago on Yes, Facebook experimented on its users. But why? The answer will surprise you.

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Great experiences, however, may not be sustainable in a highly competitive and price-sensitive market.

1 month, 3 weeks ago on Marketing Update: Products and Services are Dead

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I'm going to wish you a happy birthday, early. You never know when I might keel over beside a butterfly garden in my yard. Weeding is hard work. But not as hard as weeding the silly, stupid and wrong ideas that crowd my brain.

The important thing to remember is that we can improve like a fine and fancy wine. Or spirit. I have very fond memories of a 40 year old plum moonshine. And it looks like you're doing that from over here. 

3 months, 2 weeks ago on Are You Burnt Out On Blogging?

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Write what you know and, yes, that may speak to souls. The greatest challenge for me, however, is that I know so little about the things that matter most. That I am not alone in my confusions and ignorance is no consolation, but I wish it were. A consolation. [grin] 

3 months, 3 weeks ago on 83,168 Mistakes Every Writer Makes

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I wish the greatest challenge of great writing was mostly about having a story to tell and not having spoken well (and reflected well) on beauty, goodness or truth. If the burden was bore out in word count like miles underfoot and not upon the actual multiplication of loaves and fish - enough to feed a million. Or seven. Million.

Only if.

That would be something I could teach my son across a dozen postcards or less. And if he never got them, that would be ok too. Because life would not be the gauntlet, the search, the quest and the trials that require the tireless parade of illuminations, wisdom, consolations and benedictions.

Only if. 

4 months, 2 weeks ago on 69 Reasons Why Social Media Makes Us More Stupid

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Awesome.

I can accept you for you, if and only if (1) you can accept me for me, (2) what you believe does not threaten or harm me, mine or my world AND (3) we can help each other with our things on occasion. 

That's the social contract, right? Screw Locke, Rousseau and all those other seekers and fans of power-based relationships...


And that's the problem of politics of any kind.


And religion gets into all sorts of problems when it gets political. And, yes, it gets political for all the right and wrong reasons.

I'd like to see a Jewish nation as large as the promised land - it currently occupies about 10 percent of the promised land. And that is a challenge that includes the failure of the moral character of Israel as much as the ambitions of the Devil. Me saying that may be unPC, but my saying it doesn't actually represent a threat or harm to anyone. After all, I am a nobody. And so are most of us. We're nobodies.



4 months, 3 weeks ago on Stupid Social Media Tricks & Tips

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@TheJackB @michaelsuddard  So you bring your twenty speed titanium touring bike made in Switzerland into the hipster's bmx shop in Tulsa which mostly deals with cheap Chinese one to three speeds and you tell them that the bike just doesn't go... [grin]

You have to imagine they need time to throw back the 18 pack before getting back to you on that one.

4 months, 3 weeks ago on The Long & Winding Road of Web Hosting

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I'm glad to hear you may have it figured out enough so that you can get back to writing!

One of the problems of hosting is that the technology situation opposes an effective, low cost, high volume approach. Wordpress software was never designed to be a highly reliable, fault tolerant and rapidly extensible enterprise solution.

A killer blog hosting company would need a team of ninja Wordpress code experts and that team would need to expand in correlation with increasing customers. Let's say, three new team members (senior and junior programmer and technical CS support person ) for every 300 new customers. Or, put another way, that's an annual operational cost increase of $240K (USD) with a six month lead time. All of which is doable and  profitable if they can charge a $100 set up fee and $60/month on a two year contract.

However, the market (me and you) is willing to pay about $10/month. Therefore, there is no ninja technical team to support our blog errors.

4 months, 3 weeks ago on The Long & Winding Road of Web Hosting

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Hang in there. You're worth waiting for you to figure this out. Give or take 15 days or less - of course.

5 months ago on Left to my own devicesboo

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Information has become a commodity of decreasing value and increasing disaffection for all the right and wrong reasons. Rampant, rabid and meaningless marketing and communication contributes to the devaluation and disaffection - especially in social media. Let's reflect, however, on disaffection.How are we supposed to feel deeply (happy or sad) about anything when our social stream can easily be characterized as a hyper-rapid cycling of mood?I do not believe the human brain was designed for such cycling of neurotransmitters at the current rate which social media and marketing wants to provoke in us. In fact, such cycling of mood at far less frequency is diagnosed as mental illness. To the point, hyper bi-polarity and dysympathy can be the consequence.What are [sic] I talking about?Looking at your recent Facebook timeline, in the same hour, there are several posts representing several different moods:1. A photo of Norman Reedus appealing, perhaps, to our sense of humor2. Your thoughts on a lack of general interest in Black History Month appealing to our sense of criticality3. Your tribute to Phyllis Wheatley appealing to our sense of admiration4. Link to this post appealing, perhaps, to our sense of righteous indignation, mistrust in humanity, etc.

 

Even if the above were posted hours or days apart, they would appear together and present a problematic canvass.My own timeline, of course, is a cause of concern to me.More interesting than this is how comments by the same person can reflect hyper cycling of mood. Myself, I have been surprised by how persons can agree and viciously oppose different opinions by the same author/commenter in the same hour. 

6 months, 2 weeks ago on Social Media: A Real Life Digital Town Without Pity

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@margieclayman

It's a strange feeling, indeed, when they don't seem to know better.

6 months, 4 weeks ago on Are You Being Nice or Manipulative?

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Assuming that the intention of such exercises are not self-serving or more "business as usual", I believe there is no evil or insincerity in the exercise of patience, kindness, and hospitality as an act of will.

In other words, a good exercise of virtue does not need to reflect or be inspired by a benevolent, emotional feeling.

On the other hand, because social status-metrics-results have been predominantly driven by popularity contests of the kindergarden and high school kind, social brands (people and companies) have often pursued popularity, followers, comments, likes, etc. by a disciplined and aggressive pretense of friendship, affection, opinion alignment, encouragement, etc. 


Most of these manipulative brand plays are obvious to anyone who has lived out love, friendship, and relationship with sincerity.

7 months ago on Are You Being Nice or Manipulative?

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Keep your sights high on the greatest of treasures, Jayme. You have done amazing things here and elsewhere in the blogosphere, intertubes, and internets. And you will do more. It will be more amazing than you can imagine.

Because love never fails.

7 months ago on I Married My Blog

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You carry the torch, Jayme! Hold it high. There is ever need for light and notice. And cheerful fits of good will!

The near future remains to be written, collaboratively, regardless of the outpouring of enchantments wanting to pass for writing, relating and collaboration. But you can make your mark, Jayme. You can make the difference.

And you are.

And, yes, one day I will call you up out of the blue and read to you some Dr. Seuss. Maybe Horton Hears A Who.




7 months, 4 weeks ago on The Happy Friday Series: Seven Happy Peeps

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On a lighter note, we'll have to wait an estimated 25 years for this great revolution. Five to seven years for business schools to get this new model into their curriculm and then 20 years for it to be integrated into business culture and practice.

8 months ago on The New Rules: Return on Trust

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congrats!

9 months, 3 weeks ago on Clayman Has Some Big News To Share With You

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Awesome!

10 months, 2 weeks ago on Are “Online Friendships” Real?

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@margieclayman @Faryna Totally agree with you Margie!

10 months, 3 weeks ago on Companies are still asking the wrong questions about social media

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This meditation is helpful, Margie.

Initially, the best social media efforts tend to be led by an energetic and enthusiastic social media strategist - an online taste-maker with advanced design, social, community and communication skills. As the social media effort matures, this rock star will lead, mentor, identify and tap others who can powerfully enrich the effort, impact and return on investment. All of which requires serious investment, precious resources, bold and prudent decision and mission-critical commitment. None of which is easy to muster in companies with deep dysfunctions, lack of ambition, or, worse, relatively shallow troughs.

10 months, 3 weeks ago on Companies are still asking the wrong questions about social media

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I'm glad for you. That you're going to spend time with the family. Enjoy that my friend.

1 year, 1 month ago on Homeward Bound- A Post You Just Won't Read

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Since this is also about social, online, etc., let's go through the usual questions that I go through with clients:

1. Does the customer urgently need it? Why? Can they get it elsewhere?

Are there bodies of water nearby?

2. Is it visible and/or audible? Is it's utility visible and obvious? 

Does it sparkle? Does it bubble, froth and ring?

3. Is it user-friendly? Usable? Easy to use? Is there added value?

How deep is the water? How fresh? Is a feeder nearby?

4. Is it safe to use?

Are there dogs, cats or other predators that move within 100 yards of the birdbath? 

5. What is the result you want and how much are you willing to invest in that objective?

Do you want to see birds? Do you just want birds to be happy? What about butterflies? 

I'm getting wonderful, magical results from my new gardens. Birds, bees, butterflies, fireflies, lady bugs, bats, etc. But the fruit can only be good as the works.

Of course, I've spent about $4000 so far and I put in a minimum of two hours/day in the yard - 7 days/week for going on three months now. And there was a hundred hours of reading, talking to master gardeners, etc.

Ken, I wish you success in all your good endeavors

1 year, 2 months ago on Of Bird Baths and Social Media: It’s Not the Tools

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@Nisha360 You are a constant inspiration for me, Nisha.

1 year, 2 months ago on 12 Most Potatoey Portraits of Social Media Goodness

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@AlaskaChickBlog Big hug to you, Amber Lee!

1 year, 2 months ago on 12 Most Potatoey Portraits of Social Media Goodness

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@BelindaSummers Thanks for saying so, B. Anyone can bring something amazing to the table. It's what makes the internets and social.

1 year, 2 months ago on 12 Most Potatoey Portraits of Social Media Goodness

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@wonderoftech You rock the potato, Carolyn!

1 year, 3 months ago on 12 Most Potatoey Portraits of Social Media Goodness

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@RachelintheOC I see a potato portrait in your future, Rachel. [grin] Maybe with horns?

1 year, 3 months ago on 12 Most Potatoey Portraits of Social Media Goodness

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@PaulBiedermann One of the very best and awesome things about social is the opportunity to curate people - as opposed to content. And you, Paul, are a force of potatoey goodness, indeed.

1 year, 3 months ago on 12 Most Potatoey Portraits of Social Media Goodness

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@Mark_Harai Good to see you here, Mark. And if you still need help with the new website, let me know.

1 year, 3 months ago on 12 Most Potatoey Portraits of Social Media Goodness

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@BruceSallan Can there be social without Bruce?! [grin]

1 year, 3 months ago on 12 Most Potatoey Portraits of Social Media Goodness

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@Harleena Singh Have a great weekend Harleena. And keep on writing those posts that make me think!

1 year, 3 months ago on 12 Most Potatoey Portraits of Social Media Goodness

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Betsy did a wonderful job! And I think she had a lot of fun too.

1 year, 3 months ago on 12 Most Potatoey Portraits of Social Media Goodness

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If you can do more good doing something else (occasionally or frequently), don't let social media distract you.

 

On the other hand, too many of us spend more time than we should (or need to) spend on the internets. If you find yourself in that situation where you can't go a four hours without checking your "inbox" (email or otherwise), that's a personal problem. Been there and done that - more often than I want to admit. 

 

[hug]

1 year, 3 months ago on Once in a Lifetime

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Your questions about what connection remind me now of Michael Robert's poem, Ultramarine - in which Solomon searches, foolishly and heroically, for the 'perfect blue.' Perhaps, Nietzsche would say, "it's all too human." But not in fist-banging-on-table, contemptuous defiance of our humanity!

 

Ultramarine

 

Looking for the perfect blue,

water to swim in, not through,

 

to fill his sea, his massive bowl

of hand-thick bronze which should hold

 

more than light (its dozen

compass-pointing bearer oxen

 

braced in constant expectation),

Solomon scoured every nation

 

for a colour that was right.

Now and then he would catch sight

 

of utter blue as he bent down

in some remote spice-scented town

 

to wash a day's heat from his face,

but when he moved the dish - no trace.

 

If water needed Autumn's slant,

the market traders' day-long chant,

 

a smell of orange, sandalwood

elusive as the blue in blood,

 

then he would reproduce it all -

and this was wisdom. Some would call

 

it waste, a bad example;

some will never build a temple.

 

- Michael Symmons Robert

1 year, 3 months ago on I Heard A Fly Buzz When I Signed Off

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 @Spafloating 

 

None of us have all the good answers - not even a good number of tentative good answers. Some don't have even a few tentative, good answers. But we're all searching - more or less - for something that works for us. Our methodologies, however, vary widely. For all the right and wrong reasons.

 

We all need teachers, mothers and paths. And we will choose them according to where we are. Sometimes where we are is a bad place and we will make the worst choices: follow false teachers, embrace savage mothers and walk dark and broken paths. 

 

I feel great sympathy for those captured in the cunning nets of vampires and sorcerers. 

1 year, 4 months ago on Needing the Illusion of Grandeur to Be Real

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 @JillKroppManty  

 

That's awesome, Jill! I've taken a break from MAA. But if you don't know about it, I founded the Facebook group, Marvel Universe Gazette. It's a good group to learn and share about the game with thousands of members.

 

https://www.facebook.com/groups/424345640918346/

1 year, 4 months ago on Needing the Illusion of Grandeur to Be Real

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 @margieclayman  

 

But for all the glory, wins and badges in MMOs, social games, and some online communities, I have no delusions of grandeur. Perhaps, because a confession will remind me, loud and clear, that my struggle against my own lesser nature is constant.  

 

Of course, I have no super powers and I would make a sorry weekend warrior. [laughing]  

 

If anything, I bring much of me into the online game world and other online activities - compassion, conscience and hope among other things. Speaking of Marvel Avengers Alliance (in the previous comment), I went through much disappointment and frustration outing a violent-psycho-pedophile.

 

And the reward for my effort was a death threat from a man with a violent criminal history. But it wasn't the first time. [grin]

 

Do people become absorbed in games or social in an unhealthy way?

 

Some do. 

 

Some come broken, disappointed, and desperate for something more. Some find love, friendship, trust, inspiration, and respect which is lacking in their offline life. Some try to take it by force or deception and that's a shame. Because we all want these things and virtue is the best approach - as Aristotle pointed out so long ago.

 

 

 

1 year, 4 months ago on Needing the Illusion of Grandeur to Be Real

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 @margieclayman  @JillKroppManty 

 

Once I was a mighty troll warrior champion that wielded two blood point daggers and wore a flaming cloak looted from the corpse of a mighty dragon. None could fell me in PVP. But my greatest joy, I admit, was in serving my guild and being the first to hit our targets - even though it often meant death and the agony of regaining lost experience and level. And the pleasure of meeting brothers and sisters with a true warrior spirit - was awesome - from the C-suite to grocery store baggers.  

 

In Star Wars Galaxies, I was the richest merchant in the universe. For a time. But I enjoyed most the equipping of worthy companions - beyond their wealth and imagination. Again, I met good people. C-suite people too.

 

In Travian, I pitted my wits against formidable strategists - especially the German industrialists. For years! I commanded the actions of thousands of players - to attack. To defend. For glory!

 

Travian was brutal and exhausting but I learned much that I would apply to online strategy and drive impossible client victories.

 

In Marvel Avengers Alliance, I ranked first in PVP more times than any other player, but I enjoyed most being a player advocate and challenging the game developers and producers to fix the bugs, create a better game experience and live up to their service commitment. 

 

All of which (and more) has contributed to my person and, hopefully, my evolution.

 

 

 

 

1 year, 4 months ago on Needing the Illusion of Grandeur to Be Real

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It is worse than you want to suggest. And yet there is also great beauty - a beauty that is deeper and truer than you may recognize or want to admit. Such is the human experience. Why should it be any different online?

 

Are you still caught up in those illusory distinctions that suggest that the online experience is not true? [grin]

 

I don't imagine you are.

 

The grandeur of an online personality need not be a fiction - unless, of course, it is a deception. The heroic leader of a top alliance in World of Warcraft serves the members of his/her alliance with passion - we can presume. And that is not something to shake a stick at. The social celebrity with one million followers must be saying enough of the things that people want to hear - that does not mean, however, that what they are saying is good or true.

 

Social media provides us with an opportunity to connect and share with others - especially those who share common ideas, feelings, interests, aspirations, hopes and prejudice. Some bring more of themselves to their online activity than others. Some express themselves more fully or capably than others. And, yes, there are attention whores too.

 

Social media is as good and evil as the people who come to it. And that is unavoidable and inescapable. 

 

1 year, 4 months ago on Needing the Illusion of Grandeur to Be Real

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I'm concerned by several problematics of CNN's coverage.

1. The constant referral of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev as Suspect 2 seemed an unnecessary dehumanization of the suspect. 

Suspect 1 was dead and yet the reporters and anchors continued to refer to the deceased Tamerlan as Suspect 1 - almost as if he was still living. All of which reminded me of the scene from Silence of the Lambs where the sociopathic, serial killer instructs the victim to use lotion.

"It rubs the lotion on its skin..."

2. The complete lack of interest/discussion of the suspension of the usual civil liberties in the pursuit of the suspect. 

People were arrested on the spot for refusing to fully cooperate with law enforcement searching their homes and property. Furthermore, the press never made public announcements/explanations regarding the new laws where search warrants are not required and miranda warnings are not issued to ordinary citizens. There is also a question about what discoveries made (unrelated to the terrorist search) can be used against ordinary citizens.

3. The heavy handed "leading" of character witnesses (including Tsarnaev's mother and father) to speak in a manner that presumes the guilt of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev

All of which suggests to me that mainstream journalism is unapologetically aligned with the financial mission of the news corporation and the politics which allow it access to official information and insight. My indictment does not simply suggest an irresponsible, sensational journalism that lacks objectivity - but a license to advance a politically correct and state-sponsored point of view that denies contradictory facts, opinions and questions. This is not an original insight.

In a 2010 op-ed, NY Times columnist and Pulitzer Prize winning author Thomas Friedman made the same indictment of mainstream journalism. Nor is Friedman alone in the criticism of mainstream journalism.

Good journalism will not diminish our sorrow for the victims of the Boston marathon bombs. It will not diminish our sympathy for the families of the victims. It will not diminish our pride in the first responders, law enforcement personnel and medical personnel who served/serve with courage and energy. Good journalism will not prevent the nation's search for answers, understanding, justice and healing.

The irony is not lost on me that CNN displayed the same tweet from the Boston Police Department (about Dzhokhar's capture) - the same tweet that I had posted a minute faster on my Facebook account. What great value did CNN bring - if they only fact they knew was a fact available to the ordinary citizen?

1 year, 4 months ago on Glass houses in social media

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 @AlaskaChickBlog 

 

Amber-Lee is amazing. I hope she feels herself to be amazing, too,

 

And she's right on in her want to remind us to re-focus on being the amazing that is in each of us.

1 year, 4 months ago on Why do we post the things we do to the online world?

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 @margieclayman 

 

A network ping tests whether a particular host is reachable across an IP network. A ping tritely searches and verifies route, connection and presence; it also signals the presence of the pinger.

 

The ping in active sonar can provide considerable information - presence, distance and, sometimes, three dimensional descriptions. 

 

The social ping, it means as little or much, as we make of it - pinger and pingee. Which can be quite confusing. [grin]

 

As you know, I am want to be a gentle advocate of likes, +1s, trite and positive comments, and whatever as positive ping backs (whenever possible) - not necessarily as affirmations of content, judgments or qualitative assessments.  Of course, that does not prevent conversations and engagement in which affirmations, contentions, judgment and qualitative assessments are exercised.

1 year, 4 months ago on Why do we post the things we do to the online world?

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