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Trudy Campbell = Supergirl. I love it! Us diehard Trudy fans would certainly enjoy her 'flying' away from that Riddler type lowlife Pete forever, yes. Is there also a comic book character counterpart for Linda Cardellini's recent addition to the program, Sylvia Rosen?

1 year, 6 months ago on ‘Mad Men’ Characters and Their Comic Book Counterparts – Flavorwire

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Great range of films here. My wild card is Peter Bogdanovich not only making his directorial debut, but also playing the role of Sammy, friend to horror movie legend Byron Orlok (Boris Karloff) in TARGETS (1968). It stands as one of the best filmmaking debuts of the movie brat generation, proving Bogdanovich also was, and still is, a very good actor. A true double-gainer of cinema!

1 year, 7 months ago on The Best Directorial Debuts by Famous Actors – Flavorwire

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Would've loved to see Betty Buckley, Miss Collins in the original 1976 movie, on Broadway during the 1988 production of the book-to-film-to-musical Carrie, this time as Margaret White. And a musical of that little seen flick The Caller (1987, about a mysterious man and a woman alone in a cabin, starring Malcolm McDowell and Madolyn Smith-Osborne), maybe now with Jeremy Renner and Kate McKinnon, could entice me to buy a ticket!

1 year, 7 months ago on The Most Unlikely Film-to-Musical Adaptations – Flavorwire

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Long before the video driven social network era of comedy began, there were serious consequences to being a joke thief, or even merely accused of it. Major ostracizing within the comedians' circles, and a permanent damage to one's reputation. Now, plagiarism just looks like a speeding ticket of sorts in the entertainment world. Makes me a bit nostalgic for the 'old days', yes. Those stand ups who've truly succeeded with critical and street level credibility usually started before YouTube, facebook, Twitter, and Dane's old stomping grounds of MySpace turned everything upside down for the development of newer voices. But feuds CAN be a lot of fun!

1 year, 7 months ago on The Most Notorious Feuds in Comedy History – Flavorwire

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It's unfortunate, and quite boring, to see almost every single action movie poster with an actor holding a gun. That's a cliche I wish would start to fall out of popularity. But if you voiced any complaints to a marketing executive about this, they'd look at you as if it was the craziest thing to possibly say. Just from a purely artistic point of view, can we get some other images for variety's sake?

1 year, 7 months ago on Great Movies With Embarrassingly Bad DVD Art – Flavorwire

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What a mind, so refreshingly honest and funny! My favourite quotes not included here already were about how many magazines he subscribes to (over three hundred!) and a list of what he typically took outside with him on any given day: change for parking meters, a toothpick, sunglasses, and a trashy tabloid to read. Long live Mr. Waters!

1 year, 7 months ago on 67 Great John Waters Quotes For His 67th Birthday – Flavorwire

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No one particular scene for me, but his presence as Eric Bogosian's producer In TALK RADIO (1988), when Baldwin was on the cusp of movie stardom, still packs a punch. Hard to believe he was primarily a television actor on THE DOCTORS and KNOTS LANDING, among several other programs in his salad days. The Dan role (as directed by Oliver Stone, adapting Bogosian's play) showed us what we'd see a lot more of in the future, a confident, at times explosive actor who could go up against the best in the business. And that was just one of five films Alec had that year!

1 year, 7 months ago on Celebrate Alec Baldwin’s 55th Birthday With His 10 Best Scenes – Flavorwire

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Years after No Beast So Fierce was made into Ulu Grosbard's Straight Time (and also after Reservoir Dogs turned into a sensation), Edward 'Mr. Blue' Bunker's gritty novel The Animal Factory became a Steve Buscemi directed look at prison life. And the writer's bonus includes a commentary track on the dvd featuring Bunker and his friend, actor and fellow San Quentin ex-con Danny Trejo. A true triple crown: adapting your own book (with John Steppling) into a script for the big screen, appearing in a role, and discussing it all at length with another expert witness on the subject.

1 year, 8 months ago on 10 Authors Who Loved the Film Adaptations of Their Books – Flavorwire

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My Big Fat Greek Life came on CBS soon after the film Nia Vardalos wrote and starred in, based on her one-woman play.  But a mere seven episodes doesn't make a show a hit. Some good things are best left the way they once were.

1 year, 8 months ago on 10 Movies You Never Knew Were Also TV Shows – Flavorwire

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Cool stuff. I'd like to see some Penguinesque designs for Tarantino's lesser known work, like the early short My Best Friend's Birthday (co-written by Craig Hamann), and his Four Rooms anthology segment 'The Man from Hollywood'.

1 year, 8 months ago on Tarantino Films as Penguin-style Book Covers – Flavorwire

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Yes, Canada produces sketch comedy talent much more than great sitcoms, but that's rooted in our peculiar television industry's trends. One short lived program (only 13 episodes) that's deserving of a larger audience outside our nation was Alice, I Think (based on a series of young adult novels), about a teen and her family in a British Columbia town. One memorable story has a live action version of The Simpsons quality, as Alice and her younger brother deal with the consequences of secretly eating meat and sugar for the very first time (she's guilt ridden, he's hyperactive to a cartoony extreme). Fun show that parents and children alike could enjoy.

1 year, 8 months ago on The 12 Best Non-US Sitcoms of the Past 30 Years – Flavorwire

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Hmm, does MTV even show videos anymore? Seems a bit tame now, but Frankie Goes To Hollywood's 'Two Tribes' (1983, directed by former 10cc members Godley and Creme) was a wonderful little piece of poking politics in the eyes satire. Sounding like a Steinski audio collage at the beginning, and looking like a raucous Monty Python sketch throughout, it feels perfect for the soulless George W. Bush era as well. Considering FGTH's Holly Johnson also appeared in Brian De Palma's film BODY DOUBLE (along with the hit 'Relax', another banned video feather in Frankie's cap), he was a great video icon of the easily shocked early 1980s!

1 year, 8 months ago on The Most Controversial Music Videos of All Time – Flavorwire

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Two of my favourite Maurice Micklewhite explanations: he chose the screen name 'Caine' when he was in a phone booth talking to his agent and saw two film titles on marquees across the street, 101 DALMATIANS and THE CAINE MUTINY, so he picked the logical one for his profession. AND, how one can't go into adult bookstores once they're famous, because they WILL announce you by name, maybe even over a PA system! He's just the best. I mean, even a stinker like BLAME IT ON RIO did nothing to hurt his career!

1 year, 8 months ago on 80 Wonderful Michael Caine Quotes for His 80th Birthday – Flavorwire

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Thank you for including RONNIE ROCKET! Since reading about this in a Premiere magazine article on scripts big name directors couldn't get made, I'm still waiting all these years later for it to be produced. Hard to believe David Lynch can't just snap his fingers and get people to finance all of his ideas, but that's showbiz for you.

1 year, 8 months ago on 10 Long-Awaited Cult Movie Projects We’d Like to See Kickstarted – Flavorwire

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I can only guess what listeners thought about Sense of Doubt when it was first released on the HEROES album in 1977, but it has a timeless spookiness that sounds appropriate for a 1920s silent film or practically anything created today as well. Bowie consistently manages to be a hit maker and also operate well below the radio/video friendly showbiz surface on many of his records throughout a long and unique career!

1 year, 8 months ago on A Selection of Great Underrated David Bowie Tracks – Flavorwire

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Tom Noonan's performance in MANHUNTER is really the one out of all the Thomas Harris stories adapted for the big screen that gets deepest down into the viewer's mind. Dolarhyde IS a madman, but feels much more believable than the other dangerous characters. Funniest (and oddly enough, the sweetest) poetic mention on a TV show for me was Mrs. Louder on The Drew Carey Show being a huge James Dickey fan. Dickey's still best known today for his novel DELIVERANCE and his cameo as a sheriff in the film, so his poetry getting some attention in an unlikely way was nice.

1 year, 8 months ago on The Favorite Poets of Pop Culture Characters – Flavorwire

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I never get tired of seeing how record covers from past decades look today in our vinyl-is-cool-again world. Long before self-help books/infomercials became so ubiquitous, Napoleon Hill's THINK AND GROW RICH carved out a significant place in the 20th century, as it had a profound impact on everyone from members of the Bad Brains to publisher Larry Flynt. I'd like Stephen Colbert to record an album devoted to helping people cope with a scary entity like FOX News!

1 year, 8 months ago on Hilarious Vintage Self-Help Record Covers – Flavorwire

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SOAP (1977-81) and WKRP In Cincinnati (1978-82), with all of the music intact, are two more shows I'd love to see on television again.

1 year, 8 months ago on 10 Reruns Networks Should Show Instead of Their Current, Low-Rated Series – Flavorwire

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The late, great Dixie Carter certainly was the right choice to play DW's lead role. Her Julia Sugarbaker kicked ass and took names all the time. Hilarious memory, her imitating for the other ladies some not too bright boys that tried to get her attention with catcalls. Dixie is terribly missed. One other CBS comedy that deserved better, LONG before Two And A Half Brain Cells, was The Famous Teddy Z, with Jon Cryer as the new agent to a Brandoesque star. Short lived, but very funny!

1 year, 8 months ago on The 10 Most Underrated TV Sitcoms – Flavorwire

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Temple Of The Dog might not have been a 'supergroup' to most, but they recorded one very respectable album, with Chris Cornell's and  Eddie Vedder's vocals making Hunger Strike and Say Hello 2 Heaven some tunes from the nineties I have fond memories of. Ideal lineup for one band we'll never get to see or hear: Jimi Hendrix, John Bonham, Cliff Burton and Ronnie James Dio!

1 year, 9 months ago on 10 Supergroups That Were Less Than the Sum of Their Parts – Flavorwire

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Should Martin Scorsese's THE WOLF OF WALL STREET get released before 2014, I fully expect it to be among the front runners in several categories, including Best Picture. Hmm, maybe Mr. DiCaprio will finally get a Best Actor award of his own!

1 year, 9 months ago on Will These 10 Films Be Next Year’s Oscar Nominees? – Flavorwire

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After watching these awards, I really wish they hadn't happened with this particular host. I'm not a Seth hater, but we all can think of other talented and funny people whose approach to humour for the biggest televised show of the year wouldn't have been based in often obnoxious material. Tina Fey, Alan Cumming, Neil Patrick Harris, to name a few, certainly could've handled this more effectively. MacFarlane is much better suited to emceeing raunchy cable roasts than ceremonies with a modicum of class.

1 year, 9 months ago on Why Seth MacFarlane Might Not Be the Worst Oscar Host Ever – Flavorwire

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Whatever someone in charge sixteen years ago thought a performance from Lord Of The Dance had to do with film editing is beyond me, but that segment at the 1997 awards might've been planned to better overall impact with a short film of two or three minutes about, say, actual editors like Verna Fields and Walter Murch talking about their craft than having Flatley there. Just a thought!

1 year, 9 months ago on The 10 Worst Moments in Oscar History – Flavorwire

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Perhaps we can blame Pink Floyd's Roger Waters for a lot of this, with not just any old song, but the charting UK/US hit from one of the 1970s biggest albums featuring all manner of 'Money' effects. More than merely symbolic, as he said recently, after Dark Side Of The Moon's release was when the Floyd really enjoyed their first huge paydays. On the emotional side, babies in songs are my some of my personal favourite samples, most notably Stevie Wonder's daughter Aisha heard during Isn't She Lovely's outro.

1 year, 9 months ago on 10 of Music’s Weirdest Sources for Samples – Flavorwire

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Opera in many of its modern interpretations is a fascinating avenue of cinema. Having had many chances to see HD broadcasts from The Met in movie theaters, it's a truly moving stage/screen experience I recommend everyone try at least once. The 'rock operas' TOMMY and QUADROPHENIA, largely written by Pete Townshend and becoming full fledged double albums by The Who, then later films by Ken Russell and Franc Roddam respectively, are not exactly regarded as part of the official canon by purists, but spoke loudly to the young fans who were their main audience. Would love to see talents such as Alicia Keys and Nick Cave try their hand at 21st century cinoperas! (Also, Les Blank's documentary BURDEN OF DREAMS is a must see for FITZCARRALDO viewers.)

1 year, 9 months ago on 10 Great Movies Inspired by Operas – Flavorwire

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Wow, that Kurt Vile song is among the best ever from the many terrific offerings this regular feature has had!

1 year, 9 months ago on 10 MP3s You Need to Download for Free This Week: Yo La Tengo, Kurt Vile – Flavorwire

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Val Kilmer didn't exactly 'look' like several of the real people he's portrayed over the years, most notably a drug ravaged John Holmes in WONDERLAND. But the amazing intensity of his acting makes us believe we've been close to that person. Kilmer, Sean Penn and Gary Oldman are among the best at galvanizing biopics with their presence. (One person who DOES resemble a man he should portray is drummer/actor Jason Schwartzman as the late Keith Moon. Would LOVE to see that happen! :)

1 year, 9 months ago on 15 Acclaimed Actors Who Look Nothing Like the Famous People They Played – Flavorwire

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Soderbergh has certainly come a long way since he was the 15 year old who made a TAXI DRIVER homage called 'Janitor' as a 20 minute short. He said that experience taught him he didn't want to make films about other films and this is what separates him from so many directors in his age group. Most just follow the trends, while Mr. S was largely setting them as a relentless experimenter, from the late 1980s to today. How many others would revive a big star studded vehicle like OCEANS 11 and also make a tiny movie like BUBBLE (2005)? The man's approach to cinema is still full of life and deep thought even when the films themselves aren't necessarily big hits. You could remove a lot of filmmakers from history and it wouldn't make a big difference, but Soderbergh is really irreplaceable.

1 year, 9 months ago on 'Side Effects' and the End of the Soderbergh Era

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The monologue alone was an instant classic bit of person-in-the-spotlight comedy, with Lawrence (and Bill Hader as Tommy Lee Jones) goofing on awards season and its endless hype. Plus, there was no singing OR dancing for the first time in a long time! When she returns to host in the future, we can unanimously hope the material is significantly better all around. She deserves that much.

1 year, 10 months ago on The Best and Worst of Last Night's 'SNL' With Jennifer Lawrence

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FATAL ATTRACTION (1987) also started as a short, James Dearden's made for British television DIVERSION (1980), and was adapted by Dearden into the Adrian Lyne directed feature length box office smash. The short's much more modest conclusion wasn't quite as over the top (okay, nowhere near) as its big screen counterpart's, however. The Dirk Diggler Story is so cool in that TV's Ernie 'Ghoulardi' Anderson narrated his boy's early writing and directing effort. I wish the late voice of ABC was still around to narrate an entire film like PBS' Will Lyman did for LITTLE CHILDREN (2009).

1 year, 10 months ago on 10 Feature Films You Didn't Realize Started As Shorts

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Terrific piece! Back in 1998, Rob Halford of Judas Priest speaking in The Advocate about his experiences in the rock community and its attitudes about gay men in particular was a very inspiring development in entertainment. Hopefully young musicians across all genres now (especially hip-hop & metal) feel their sexuality doesn't mean they can't be out and not under the thumb of the bigotry still in music.

1 year, 10 months ago on 10 Inspiring Coming Out Speeches

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If the only track Cale ever produced by another artist/band was The Stooges' I Wanna Be Your Dog, it should be enough for a special place in the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame. The impact this song had still reverberates like a musical atomic bomb all these years later!

1 year, 10 months ago on Why John Cale Is Better (or at Least More Interesting) Than Lou Reed

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HUGE snubs (to put it politely): Juno Temple and Matthew McConaughey in KILLER JOE. (Sorry, MAGIC MIKE fans, his best 2012 performance was not featured there.) Totally agree about many of your choices, especially HOLY MOTORS and Denis Lavant, just terrific work that should represent what the academy tips their foreign language hats to in the 21st century. The Oscars. Can't handpick them, can't ignore them!

1 year, 10 months ago on The 2012 Oscar Nominees: Your Shocks, Surprises, and Snubs

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Blue Velvet's Frank Booth has become a pop culture staple since that David Lynch film was released, but I doubt anyone could deny just how unsettling he was back in 1986 when the world first took notice. Profoundly disturbing and one of Dennis Hopper's greatest performances ever. His introduction in that classic unleashes a scarypalooza that lives rent free in the viewers' minds forever. (Might've been a wee bit different if he'd used helium for that dialogue, as Lynch originally scripted.)

1 year, 10 months ago on The Scariest Scenes in Cinema

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My favourite episode will always be 'Homerpalooza' (S7-E24) and that story's delightfully weird guests (an all-star group ranging from Peter Frampton to Smashing Pumpkins, Cypress Hill and Sonic Youth, plus a fun prop from Pink Floyd's 'Animals' era) are among the greatest collections of visitors in any program's history. "Do you know 'Insane In The Brain'?"

1 year, 10 months ago on The All-Time Weirdest Guest Appearances on 'The Simpsons'

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Honorable mention should go to 'Black Death's performance on NBC's The Richard Pryor Show back in 1977. This pre-MTV comedy sex-drugs-and-rock-n-roll spectacle was as crazy as network television got back in the day!

1 year, 11 months ago on 10 Gloriously Anarchic Music Moments from Live TV

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