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The most common blog writing mistake is not writing at all.  When I read blogs, I recognize the fact that it's a conversation - and people often make small errors in conversation. If you're an English teacher writing a blog, spelling and grammar are critical. Everyone else... not so much.


Anyone who understands the origins of the English language understands that spelling and grammar are hardly the rules on which its evolution were based. You folks really must hate Shakespeare, he ignored both.

3 weeks, 6 days ago on Conversation @ http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/206228

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Great inforgraphic - I didn't realize how inside sales was on the rise!

4 months, 1 week ago on How to Select a Sales Automation Solution

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Love this video that Yum Yum did for CircuPress!

5 months, 3 weeks ago on The Ultimate Guide to Explainer Videos (with Examples)

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So this infographic is named "How we use Social Media" and there's no actual information in there on how they USE social media. Ugh.

1 year, 2 months ago on Infographic: The Social Media Generation Gap

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Reading this article, one might be tempted to believe that the two companies are exactly the same and provide the same exact service.  I don't see it that way. If I'm working on business, Uber is the choice. If I'm trying to hitch a ride, Lyft is. Why the need to battle? Seems there's enough of a demand to supply both.

1 year, 2 months ago on Uber to Lyft: We’ll beat you with our money

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Our corrupt governments throughout the world will never allow a free market for currency that they can't control, borrow, manipulate, print, and distribute for votes.

1 year, 6 months ago on LIVE: Is Bitcoin Doomed? Feds Use Search Warrant to Seize Mt. Gox Account

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 @ThorMuller  @peterrknight That should say "develop new needs".

1 year, 11 months ago on The Exciting, Terrifying Future of Work

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 @ThorMuller  @peterrknight My personal response is "no".  I don't believe leisure actually provides the emotional and psychological fulfillment that productivity does. In all seriousness as we look at the United States economy, a full 23% of the adult population isn't working - a greater amount than the great depression. However, we don't have bread lines or starvation because we've created a baseline of security through unemployment, food stamps, welfare, etc.  I'm not trying to get political here - but we have a significant population that's not productive (not necessarily through their own fault) but they do have enough to keep "their machine running".  Are they happy or content?  I don't think so - quite the opposite.  I believe there is more discontent than ever in our history.And I'm not sure what "essential work" is outside of food harvesting and energy creation. Surely my job as a marketer is not an "essential" bit of work.  However, marketing is not about essentials, it's also about fulfilling more than needs.  It's about fulfilling happiness, growth, productivity, dispelling fear, boosting self-confidence.  Maslow's hierarchy of needs is quite different today than it was even 20 years ago.  Air conditioning, Internet, refrigeration, central heating... all of these are now very high on our needs list.Look around the world at Internet use and people in areas lacking electricity utilize automobiles to charge their phones and connect to the Internet!  Humans not only have the ability to technologically fulfill needs... we also have the means to invent and develop new leads.  I'm optimistic that this is what will continue to drive entrepreneurialism. Today's jobs may go away, but needs and desires will continue to generate the demand for people to work and fulfill them.  Sweeping changes in population will also change needs and open opportunities.

1 year, 11 months ago on The Exciting, Terrifying Future of Work

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 @ThorMuller The word that I have a problem with in the quote from Professor Brynjolfsson is "eliminated".  It's as if the world had a set number of jobs and technology is picking them off one by one.  Advancements have always eliminated jobs throughout history - and we've welcomed it.

 

To reiterate - key to the problem in my opinion is that we're still stuck in the industrial revolution and this falsehood known as the "job".  With all due respect, the Professor would be best served if HE - as an influencer of our youth - stopped defining the "job" as the necessity of human existence.  We no longer need jobs - what we need is for our youth to identify where their talent could be best put to use and provide them with a trade in resources that will provide them a livelihood they appreciated.  

 

Do I have a techno-centric bias? Of course... and every time I get to mentor young people I try to excite them about the opportunities in the advancements in technologies.  It truly frustrates me to meet people who have incredible talent - but don't have the depth in vision to find the opportunities to match that talent with opportunity and truly live.  I see people wasting their entire careers in useless "jobs" and at 5PM they head out with the scraps they've accumulated and do what they love and are talented at.  They're blind that the two could be the same because they've been trained since Kindergarden that we have "jobs".  We finally live in a global economy where the possibilities are endless.  The Internet provides a global workplace that can open your products and services to anyone, anywhere on Earth.  Good riddance to "jobs"!

1 year, 11 months ago on The Exciting, Terrifying Future of Work

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Technology has always destroyed jobs... and produced better ones. It's like saying that cars were bad because they put blacksmiths out of work.  No, some jobs went away, others were created. The Internet has provided the same... having a direct impact on retail, but producing jobs like SEO, inbound marketing, web development, graphic design, hardware, data centers, etc. that were never here 20 years ago. A thousand years go, we didn't have "jobs".  We had to put our talents to use and make a living doing that, as well as augment our incomes with small farms, etc. I believe we're heading back to these days and I'm actually quite happy we are. I speak to students about the "business of New Media" and this is what I tell them. Example: Graphic Designers - If they think they're going to learn photoshop and find a "job" as a graphic designer, they're going to be in trouble. But if they learn design, usability, responsive design, web technologies, etc. and truly create and innovate - they can be at the top of their game. In other words, virtually every "job" is going the way of manufacturing.  Understanding the ecosystem is key.We still require creatives, engineers, designers, and technicians... but we can get the raw assets we need anywhere.  I can get a team in India to do research, a group in China to do the raw development, an agency in Romania to do the Usability... and we can build an incredible software platform at minimal costs.  Is that at the "expense of American jobs"?  No - I still need to hire people that have the creative capabilities to move the platform forward, the engineers to scale it, and the service teams to support it.  I will hire people.It's the globalization of resources.  The jobs we're losing aren't going away - they're just moving to countries where they're fulfilled more efficiently.  Our problem right now in this country is that everyone, including our education system, our government, and our students are preparing for "jobs" or trying to produce "jobs" that are gone forever.  We need to be preparing our youth to lead, to work in a global world, to fine-tune their entrepreneurial talent and to build businesses that are efficient and cost effective.

1 year, 11 months ago on The Exciting, Terrifying Future of Work

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As organizations become bigger, so does the ego of those in charge. And as organizations become bigger, competition arises as well. While the taste of BBQ has changed my life, it's important to put things into context... War, famine, unemployment... BBQ is pretty far down the "Things to make humanity better" list. So... It's in the past. Move on, move up! Perhaps a social media BBQ contest that you run? With the agenda in actual HH:mm EST format.

2 years, 2 months ago on What We Can Learn From Me Getting Kicked Out of a BBQ Contest

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I was curious as much as you were and didn't get much of a response from Cision.  I was really surprised at the number of blogs that were quite small on the list so I questioned their reach and influence.

2 years, 4 months ago on How accurate is Cision’s top 50 PR/marketing blog list?

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Hope he doesn't have sneezing allergies.

2 years, 11 months ago on [Stupid Tech] The Nostril Light [Video]

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It's my client, but I absolutely love the SofShell from @sofshell - it's got a tacky durable cover that doesn't slip, is easy to clean, and is softer than most.

3 years ago on 10 Social Media Pros Pick Their Favorite iPad Case

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Well said, Jay. I feel like I need to wipe out the word 'transparency' out of my speeches and conversation and, instead, continue to use the word 'persona'. The fact is no one really knows me online... they know the side of me that I want them to. That doesn't mean I'm hiding anything, it just means that we all act differently online.

3 years, 2 months ago on Social Media, Pretend Friends, and the Lie of False Intimacy

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@t.greaves I'm pretty sure the Huffington Post, TechCrunch and Mashable alone prove that having wide scopes can be successful. Key is the quality of the content.

3 years, 2 months ago on To Build Blog Subscribers, Get Narrow-Minded

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@kyleplacy The Marketing Tech Blog is still our primary vehicle for leads for DK New Media, so yes... you're still wrong. :) As for traffic, it's something we monitor but is not a priority. It's why you don't see us writing about the 'next big thing' or using news link-baiting techniques. We would rather sacrifice traffic than sell out for big numbers. Our goal is that you should be able to visit the Marketing Tech blog on a daily basis and learn something you may be able to apply to your own marketing efforts.

3 years, 2 months ago on To Build Blog Subscribers, Get Narrow-Minded

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@kyleplacy Hmmm... how do you know how we make money? You couldn't be more wrong. DK New Media's primary revenue is from companies who require assistance in leveraging technology to maximize inbound marketing efforts. Our secondary revenue stream is from venture and investment companies looking to invest in marketing technologies. Our third revenue stream is sponsorship and affiliate marketing - but that is reinvested into further promotion of the blog. Our blog's primary purpose is to help marketers. It always has been, it always will be. Having sponsors is a solid signal to our audience that the content we're generating is of value.

That said, Jay's post is correct in one respect. His focus is laser sharp and it's outstanding. Ours is more broad. The other aspect of that, though, is that Jay's niche is focused on social media and he attracts social media readers. I believe that the average behavior of a visitor on Jay's blog is much more apt to promote his content than the folks that promote content on the Marketing Technology Blog.

Great post, Jay!

3 years, 2 months ago on To Build Blog Subscribers, Get Narrow-Minded

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@jaybaer I agree and disagree. The problem is in the marketing. If Klout were simply stating that they were a means of measuring some influence on social media, it would be one thing. However, their marketing of the score in addition to "True Reach" leaves a much different impression. The fact is that I have a ton of authority through my blog, podcast and email newsletter that's NOT reflected in my Klout score. As a result, if a company was looking for influencers and believing what Klout is, they are going to miss an opportunity to promote with someone that actually had more influence than simply someone with high Klout scores. You and I understand that Klout is imperfect, but a great system... but those folks who aren't as savvy could be investing money where they aren't fully maximizing their spend.

3 years, 2 months ago on Why Critics of Klout Are Missing the Big Picture

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