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Arik,

I found your piece on this fascinating, especially when you juxapose it with the war-like effort going on behind the scenes by a charter school system defending itself after an investigative series in the Detroit Free Press. http://www.eclectablog.com/2014/06/for-profit-charter-corporations-now-in-full-blown-panic-mode-over-detroit-free-press-investigative-reporting.html


Walmart's method to me seems much more effective, because it is so short and digestible. In my previous life as a journalist, I always noticed people who lie and don't have the truth on their sides seem obliged to go into much more depth explaining why they are correct.


Walmart essentially scribbles devastating stats (right or wrong) in the margins. That makes it look like an NYT hit piece, and makes me want to read the entire response. 


This organization attacking the Detroit Free Press is writing private responses (which of course are leaked publicly) and they write pages and pages explaining why the newspaper is wrong, and ignoring what they can't explain away. Which tells me at the very least they can't defend everything in the articles, and makes me far more suspect of what they are saying.


The lesson?

Defend yourself with clean, simple, short, to-the-point arguments, if your goal is to convince others. At least to me, that's a much more convincing approach.


1 month ago on Walmart takes on the New York Times with creative PR tactic

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I totally agree with you Arik. Also irritates me when people say they want to take me out to lunch, but then expect me to pay for my lunch. That's happened to me a couple times. Maybe I'm cheap, but if you say you want to take me to lunch to pick my brain, I'd appreciate it if you actually picked up the tab!

4 months ago on Why I’m completely revamping my coffee meet-up strategy

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Great list Arik,

 

I'm putting together a free Instagram bus tour on Nov. 17 led by Instagrammers Tim Landis and http://instagrid.me/curious2119/ and Ben Madison @benjamin_Edward. We're going to take a Jefferson Lines bus around Minneapolis and St. Paul, stopping every so often at cool locations, so  the group to do some Instagramming. Should be fun. Anyhow, once we have the details in place I'll post a link.

1 year, 9 months ago on 38 top Instagrammers in Minneapolis (from 6 of my favorite local IGers)

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Ok Arik, you've convinced me to give it a shot.

2 years, 7 months ago on What’s behind the Pinterest craze? 15 super-users share their thoughts

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You've certainly given me a lot to think about DJ. I just got an iPad, so I was thinking I might just return to my old phone, since realistically I rarely need e-mail or anything else I have on my iPhone, now that I have an iPad nearby. I totally agree with you on the points above. While it feels more efficient to be able to check and send e-mail at a moment's notice, is it really? Not often.

2 years, 10 months ago on Why I Intentionally Deleted Email From My Phone

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I feel like Facebook is just doing to the social media world what Wal-Mart did to mom and pop stores across the country. Gobbling up all that is good in social media, not letting anyone else have a piece of the action.

3 years, 4 months ago on Facebook Questions Are Here

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@ElenaVerlee Too kind! Thanks Elena. I've already learned a lot about how to use Twitter effectively, thanks to you!

3 years, 4 months ago on Fifteen Ways to Use Twitter to Build an Army of Adoring Journalists

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@tressalynne Thanks! Yes, I don't think reporters want to be pitched period. But my point is mainly that Twitter is the best way to build a relationship so you're not pitching a reporter. You're just passing along a good idea to a reporter who is alway on the lookout for good stories.

3 years, 4 months ago on Fifteen Ways to Use Twitter to Build an Army of Adoring Journalists

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@3HatsComm Thanks for the comments. I agree that it's hard to actually pitch via Twitter. Frankly, it's hard to do anything on Twitter beyond launching a new relationship. Twitter is really the tool I use to follow and begin building relationships online, that build into DMs and E-mails and phone calls. I also agree on the dummy accounts. You have to click through to see how often they post, what they post, and whether they ever respond. But that's the kind of due diligence that I think most people would assume they'd have to do. I think the moral is if you want to connect with reporters, then get in the mix and actually connect via Twitter if possible. Social in general is the easiest way to go from zero to something. IMO.

Thoughts?

3 years, 4 months ago on Fifteen Ways to Use Twitter to Build an Army of Adoring Journalists

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@ginidietrich Seriously? So did I! Class of '98 (Man that sounds old). When did you graduate? Also lived in Chicago where I think you're at. Worked as a reporter for the Daily Herald. Many of my friends currently work for the Sun Times or Tribune.

3 years, 4 months ago on Fifteen Ways to Use Twitter to Build an Army of Adoring Journalists

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@ginidietrich Thanks so much Gini! Glad to be able to provide an example. Also funny you should mention Omaha. That's my hometown! Yes, I think Twitter is terribly undervalued by people trying to get traditional media attention.

3 years, 4 months ago on Fifteen Ways to Use Twitter to Build an Army of Adoring Journalists

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Gini,

Long time reader, first time commenter. Love the blog!

Anyhow, I've struggled with this as well. Two things to add:

1. Often people will pay for something, just because it's sort of an unofficial promise they'll get a better version than what's free. For example, my friend charges for blog post ideas here http://needatopic.com/ he charges $7 a month for blog post topics that probably are about as valuable as what you get from free here http://bestbloggingtipsonline.com/ but people pay because they like my friend, or they believe it's better than what they can get for free. (In full disclosure he says he's doing really well with it, and I personally haven't seen the topics he gives. So perhaps they are much better than what other blogs provide for free. And there are other benefits for the money you pay.)

2. Another way I distinguish what I charge for, is we charge for the "how" and give away the what. So we might teach the mechanics of what goes into good blog content. But we'll charge for the granular information necessary to build a blog, launch it, get traffic to it, etc. Because in theory putting together a blog is easy. But learning the how of making a successful blog is much more challenging.

3 years, 4 months ago on Four Ways to Charge for Content

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