Livefyre Profile

Activity Stream

That we can agree on.


The PRSA, like it or not [and I don't necessarily like it], is the body that represents the industry, @torcon but to suggest that managing relationships via the media just doesn't make sense.  It's like managing the relationship with my wife via an acquaintance of my mother-in-law - hoping she can persuade her to pass on the message.


The industry wonders why nobody takes it seriously... the fact that the deliverable is wrong, the value unclear and the price for doing this is sky-high might have something to do with it.  


Being a little more literal/specific might be a way to rebuild trust and build relationships.  If media coverage worked then PR companies would be using it more as a vehicle for managing their relationships with prospects and customers, surely? ;-)

3 weeks, 2 days ago on Conversation @ http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/239136

Reply

A little too literal @torcon?  It's a little too specific for most PR company tastes, I'll agree. 


It is, however, the definition used by the PRSA - apparently crowdsourced and put to a public vote to update the definition adopted in 1982! http://www.prsa.org/AboutPRSA/PublicRelationsDefined/#.VFj_BoeJnzI


Media-based 'PR' is as specific as posting something on a billboard and hoping the people you want to see it walk by while it's posted and identify themselves to you.  It also presumes you are saying the right thing to pique their interest.


If you don't have relationships with them, how do you possibly know?


If you're happy with your version that's fine, but it doesn't make it right.

3 weeks, 2 days ago on Conversation @ http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/239136

Reply

Simply, stated most people are confused about PR.  Like the author of this piece!!  

3 weeks, 2 days ago on Conversation @ http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/239136

Reply

Vikas, PR is not a channel it is a discipline.

The media is a channel but not the only one available for PR purposes.

But then you're an online marketing expert, not a PR specialist! If you write enough of these you'll probably think you're an expert in PR...

Best,

Lyndon

1 month, 1 week ago on Conversation @ http://www.entrepreneur.com/answer/222323

Reply

But companies and government agencies were always aware of the time of their announcement, long before 24-hour news - and much of the 'news' on CNN is repeated to the point that people change channel because there is nothing new; nothing of interest.  It's just noise.


There are a handful of global companies that need to be proactive 24-hour marketers.


Apple isn't a 24-hour marketer - yet it does OK!  It understands that the key is to invest time, effort and money only when they have something to day.  They run a small number of campaigns on multiple platforms and the planning is meticulous... it's probably the reason they're so successful.

2 months, 3 weeks ago on Marketers, Welcome to the Pressure of the 24-Hour News Cycle

Reply

Scott, some great questions.  Commitment to both the agency and to the people they're looking to build relationships with is key.  Having a third party build the relationship on their behalf is counter intuitive and means the customer never has the relationship - whether it is with prospects, influencers, analysts, investors or journalists.


Great to see somebody else that understands the fundamentals of PR.  Too many people confuse publicity [media coverage] with public relations [building and maintaining relationships].


best wishes,


Lyndon

Founder, http://thinkdifferently

3 months, 1 week ago on Conversation @ http://www.entrepreneur.com/video/218193

Reply

An don't, whatever you do, hire a PR company to be your intermediary.  


If you need help understanding how to build relationships with journalists then get help, but don't put another barrier between you and the reporter.  You need to own the relationship, not pay somebody else to do it for you.

3 months, 2 weeks ago on Conversation @ http://www.prdaily.com/Main/Articles/17066.aspx

Reply

How about thinking like your customers, rather than journalists?  How abut thinking like their readers?


Lyndon

Founder http://thinkdifferently.ca

4 months ago on Conversation @ http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/235969

Reply

Many companies overlook the importance of visual look and feel in creating an expectations amongst customers.

4 months, 1 week ago on Your Brand Is More Than The Obvious

Reply

A press release is different to a news release, so you might want to figure that out before you send either.  Here's an explanation http://thinkdifferently.ca/differently/pr-espresso-difference-between-a-press-release-and-a-news-release


"Remember that press releases are a major form of branding" - actually, they're not. At least not by design - they are a means of communicating information to the media. 


Also, if you natural corporate voice isn't AP then writing a release in AP won't work.  Most importantly, most news outlets - online and off-, don't use AP style.  The key is to write for your audience.


If you have any specific questions about press and news releases I'd be very happy to answer them. Call me on 1. 647.773.2677.


Lyndon Johnson

Founder, http://thinkdifferently.ca


4 months, 2 weeks ago on Conversation @ http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/234974

Reply

@Do your own PR PR is not about media lists.  It's about relationship building... the media is a channel for starting conversations. ONE channel of many.  You limit the possibilities if you focus on the media [like trying to book a vacation where the only mode of transport is a bicycle, or car, or airplane].


If you're going to do your own PR talk to me first.  For $50 I can save you a lot of wasted time, energy and money!!


Lyndon

Founder, http://thinkdifferently.ca

4 months, 3 weeks ago on Conversation @ http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/235339

Reply

So, red is neither good nor bad.  It depends.  


Thanks for that razor-sharp piece of marketing insight Entrepreneur magazine!! 

4 months, 3 weeks ago on Conversation @ http://www.entrepreneur.com/video/234860

Reply

There's some good generic advice in here, but it's talking about publicity, not PR.  


Here's a cheat sheet on the definitions of PR, marketing and publicity  http://t.co/lJSLQAb0KK

4 months, 3 weeks ago on Conversation @ http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/235339

Reply

Thanks @cspenn, some interesting ideas here.  I recorded my take on measuring PR here and would love your thoughts on it http://t.co/WukmOb0tZe


Best wishes, Lyndon

5 months, 1 week ago on Find the ROI of PR By Measuring the Value of Audience

Reply

Not shoehorning everything via the media is another strategy?  Communicating directly with your audience gets around having journalists determine whether you get to talk with your audience.  Focusing on building relationships, rather than press coverage is also critical.  


Lyndon

Founder, http://thinkdifferently.ca

5 months, 2 weeks ago on Conversation @ http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/234397

Reply

@LeShann Spot on.  Apple is actually one of the best companies for social - just not in the way that most have come to think about it.  Companies spend millions on social media platforms trying to build what Apple has - and they largely fail.


I would argue that Apple focused on the brand values [Think Different campaign as an example] rather than individual products and it is this that means that every time something new is launched people want to be part of it.  I absolutely agree that most pundits don't have a clue about how marketing [and my profession, public relations] work and are too blinkered to learn.

6 months ago on Is Apple Anti-Social?

Reply

@obrimark I would say that are anti social platforms - not anti-social.

6 months ago on Is Apple Anti-Social?

Reply

Agree.  But it's becoming less important from my experience.

11 months, 2 weeks ago on Conversation @ http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/230107

Reply

Content marketing.  The term content marketing needs to be banned until the majority of people using it understand it.  We also need to sort the problem of shortening attention spa... did somebody mention twerking?

1 year ago on Conversation @ http://www.entrepreneur.com/video/230000

Reply

All good advice.  I'd also add that they need to look at all of the channels to audience, rather than a single focus on the media.

1 year ago on Conversation @ http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/229345

Reply

@Stephen Key Hi Stephen, it's an interesting discussion so thank you for starting it.  My point, I guess, is that there's a huge difference between having a starting point to brainstorm and being an expert.  There is simply no way you can become an expert of any kind in an hour - an hour isn't even give you time to read widely enough to form an informed opinion.

 Why does it this matter?  Because people are self-titling themselves as experts without the  credentials to back it up and as a result they end up spreading nonsense off the back of their presumed 'expert' status.

 I also have an issue with the common myth that you can become, or position yourself as, an expert simply by writing a blog about it.  Sure, you're somebody with an opinion but that doesn't make you an expert simply because you create a volume of work on a topic!

 You might enjoy this post I wrote about social media 'experts' a while back http://ow.ly/qg7ay 

Best wishes, Lyndon

1 year ago on Conversation @ http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/229583

Reply

@invent7 I've gone back and re-read the article to see whether I had missed the point, as you suggested.  I think the most important thing is that the definition of expert is open to interpretation and abuse.  The article should have been called, 'you can acquire enough information to make creative decisions in an hour'.


Expertise implies practical application, to me.  It is somebody that has tried and tested some of the creative ideas to see what works - not somebody that has read enough to come up with a clever idea that doesn't, ultimately, work because they've not got the real-world experience of having repeated the exercise over and over again to be able to talk and act from experience.

1 year, 1 month ago on Conversation @ http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/229583

Reply

There are techniques that I learned as a journalist that meant you could sound like an expert for a few minutes, while covering a story but the truth is that you can't become an expert in an hour, a week, a month or just because you write about it regularly.  Expertise takes time and the sooner people get over the obsession with either describing themselves as experts in one topic or another then the better it will be for everybody.

1 year, 1 month ago on Conversation @ http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/229583

Reply

They say that recessions are where the next generation of successful businesses are bred - and I'm not sure  that we're fully recovered.  I think that more entrepreneurs have to be prepared to bootstrap startups, rather than what many do and default to relying on the investment route, but agree, there's never been a better time to be an entrepreneur!  

I'm a first-time entrepreneur and loving it! 

1 year, 2 months ago on Conversation @ http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/228224

Reply

@JimJosephExp It was - and that's often the hardest part of pulling off something like that.  Often 'stunts' leave people scratching their heads!

I still can't believe that Stratos actually happened.  There were so many potential risks that most companies would have found one reason or another for deciding it wasn't worth it.  I take my hat off to the team that made it happen.

1 year, 3 months ago on Conversation @ http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/227793

Reply

First, the Red Bull Stratos  'stunt' wasn't a stunt at all - it was event/experience marketing.

Also, shock value is dangerous - very dangerous - because it has the potential to upset as many people as it appeals to.  The Red Bull Stratos experience had a huge potential to go very badly wrong and the company built in a broadcast delay to the feed just in case the jump didn't go to plan.  There's shocking and then there is shocking!

@THINK_Lyndon 

1 year, 3 months ago on Conversation @ http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/227793

Reply

There's a general rule of thumb for press releases... journalists usually read the headline, first paragraph, quote and boiler plate.  Anything else is just unnecessary padding.

As for links, for releases being sent to journalists, rather than posted online, there should be one link - to a press area on your website - where they can get audio, images, video...

If you don't get the content of the release right [make it interesting and relevant] then all the links in the world are useless.

@THINK_Lyndon  

1 year, 3 months ago on Conversation @ http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/228054

Reply

I think that V2V might be a valuable addition to the SXSWi brand.  The key will be keeping the calibre of the event's speakers and ensuring that it remains relatively small in comparison to Austin - the problems will start if V2V grows and attendees see it as an alternative to Austin, rather than an opportunity to top up their experience.

1 year, 3 months ago on Conversation @ http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/227860

Reply

I always plan what I'm going to do on a flight and try to get it done before arrival.  If I know I have an hour, I plan something that can be done in an hour; likewise on a four or five hour trip I plan something that I know can be accomplished in that time, rather than trying to do something that I know I'll have to pick up again at a later date.

1 year, 3 months ago on Conversation @ http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/227763

Reply

Great piece, thank you for writing it.  Startups have an opportunity to lead the way in which companies use social media as part of their marketing and PR activities.  It starts by understanding who your audience is and how they want to be engaged - and so few companies understand how to do it properly at the moment. 

I had a great experience with Warby Parker too, which I blogged about at the time.  I love the fact they make personalized videos.

1 year, 4 months ago on Conversation @ http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/227399

Reply

I think the most important part of dealing with trolls is to understand what is a troll and what is somebody that doesn't agree with your point of view.  Too many people classify everybody that disagrees with their perspective a troll - which isn't right... it's just easier to adopt the 'don't feed the trolls' defence and ignore them.

1 year, 6 months ago on Seven Tips for Dealing with Online Trolls

Reply

Getting access to journalists and opportunities is just the first part of PR.  If you're not equipped to deal with journalist questions, or don't have your value proposition sorted then press coverage could be the worst thing for your business.  Contrary to the myth, all PR is not good PR!  

1 year, 7 months ago on Josh Kopelman: First Round’s new PR platform doesn’t enable lazy journalism

Reply