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These are some great tips, especially #3, #5 and #6 (I love to think of presentations in terms of the story it tells). But the presentations are only half the battle. You could have the spiciest, creamiest presentation in the world (that sounded slightly wrong), but if you as a speaker can't deliver it so people eat it up, it doesn't matter. That's a skill that is very difficult to come by - some people are naturally charismatic and engaging, others have to learn it over time and trial by fire over and over again. I'm the latter of the two, but moderating and presenting webinars regularly over a number of months has helped me to gain more confidence.

And that's a big part of presenting - confidence. You have to look confident, act confident, and have complete confidence in what your presenting. Otherwise no one else will.

1 year ago on Six Tips for Better Public Speaking

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Traditional PR is still very much alive - and even I, as a straight-up marketer, can tell you that! Any smart PR/advertising/marketing pro worth their salt knows that to be successful in their respective disciplines, they need to have the foundational knowledge and adapt and apply that to the ever-changing tactics of the time. Whether social media or SEO, the strategies can exist and play well in the sandbox together with PR. And, I think it's important that we keep an open mind to how they all can work together. Don't get too stuck in our own little worlds and fields of expertise. There's a lot we can all learn from each other.

1 year, 3 months ago on The Blending Of PR With Marketing Is Its Death

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@AmyMccTobin sxc.hu is a good one. I also like stock photo sites like istockphoto that allow you to buy credits for $20 or $30, and the images are great.I'd also like to point out with using sites like Flickr - even when you use a CC photo, make sure to credit it. Just out in a simple caption that says "Photo credit" and the name of the person linking back to their profile.

1 year, 5 months ago on That Photo You Found On the Internet Could Cost You

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 @ginidietrich OK, here's my two cents (or, since we're talking about the London Olympics, 2p):

 

There was probably some lowly account manager at Twitter involved with the NBC "account" (I'm calling it that because no doubt it's a service provider/client relationship there) who was monitoring Olympic tweets and was tasked with alerting higher-ups if anything out of the ordinary was tweeted. As a result, that account manager did what I'm sure he/she was supposed to do when this tweet surfaced - essentially "following orders" to preserve the lucrative relationship with NBC.

 

I'm not saying that what transpired was right. Yes, everything that NBC is doing with regards to the Olympics sucks (tape delay, censorship, crap commentary, not to mention cutting out an entire portion of the opening ceremonies for an inane interview with Michael Phelps). But, Twitter has a (I'm sure, paid) partnership with NBC and feels obligated to work within those parameters. And I'm sure there was some strong-arming on NBC's part, too. 

 

I too would've loved to be a fly on the wall during that meeting at Twitter, deciding what to do about Guy's tweet. Perhaps there was some discussion about censorship before making the decision to do what they thought was right for the partnership. We may never know.

2 years, 1 month ago on Reporter’s Twitter Account Suspended for Critiquing Olympics Coverage

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 @snouraini I think it's difficult for many companies to embrace the "Unicorns and Rainbows", because they feel like they can't track the warm and fuzzy part of social media. How do they know how many of those new customers bought their product because of something they saw on Twitter or Facebook? They hold promotions exactly for this reason - they tie a special discount code to it and track the promotion through a special app or platform. Bam - instant ROI. 

 

I'm not saying there aren't other ways to track return on social media efforts, I'm just saying it's very difficult to convince many of the short-sighted executives you mention that building a passionate, praise-singing social media community over time without easily-trackable promotions can work. Especially when you're trying to reach a short-term marketing goal.

2 years, 4 months ago on New Research: Americans Hate Social Media Promotions

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 @Ari Herzog Very good point. We really need a pretty exact definition of a "promotion." There are lots of brands out there that are "being" social with their fans and followers, but it's all towards promoting themselves. Doesn't matter if those brands are posting articles, polls or coupons.

 

Personally, I don't Like or follow a brand to have conversations with them. I want more out of that relationship than just the occasional "hi, how'ya doin'". Sure, I Like or follow them because I enjoy the products or services they offer; but I also enjoy receiving some additional value from the social media relationship. Although I wouldn't call it a "preference" over other forms of communication, perhaps I'm just part of that 5%.  

2 years, 4 months ago on New Research: Americans Hate Social Media Promotions

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I agree with you that "engagement" is completely overused, but I also think social media brought about a new way for brands to communicate with customers and prospects. "Engaging" with them is more than just broadcasting, and while many brands are totally guilty of doing that in social media, many others are truly engaging in conversations through social media (and gaining a lot of valuable insights from it that they can use to improve products and processes). You can't argue with that, right?

 

But, if we were to exile the word "engagement" to a deep, dark room somewhere, what word would you use to replace it?

 

BTW, glad to be a part of your "community", Daniel! ;-)

2 years, 5 months ago on 5 Social Media (Buzz)Words That Have Lost Their Way

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I'm trying to work on the first tip you mention myself, both personally and professionally. Turning negatives into positives, basically. I'm always concerned about misleading clients and promising more than what we can deliver, though. The challenge is to manage clients' expectations in a way that sets a positive tone and lets them talk through their idea, but if the idea really isn't right, making sure they don't come away thinking we're totally on board with it.

 

I also think it's important to listen to our clients' insights. While we as consultants may have been hired because we have certain expertise that the client doesn't necessarily have, we have to realize that they know more about their customers/members/supporters than we do. Their insight is worth its weight in gold, and we need to take the time to listen to them rather than assume we know everything we need to know.

2 years, 6 months ago on Avoiding the Client-Consultant Ego Clash

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Wow. Just...wow.

2 years, 6 months ago on Truly Tasteless Tweets: The Hook Rides the Huguely Trial Trend

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@Marijean It's done wonders for traffic. Plus it just LOOKS so much more professional to have "www.company.com/blog" rather than "company.wordpress.com".

2 years, 8 months ago on How I Quadrupled my Website Traffic in 2011

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WTG, Marijean! We managed to do the same - quadruple unique visits, increase the percentage of returning visitors, increase the time spent on the site and triple pageviews. One of the ways we did this was to move the blog onto our company domain (it used to be on a completely different domain). We blog regularly and point people back to other blog posts and relevant website content (like case studies and services).

2 years, 8 months ago on How I Quadrupled my Website Traffic in 2011

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@ACanadianFoodie That's just it - NO one really understands Klout's algorithm for determining influence. It's supposedly takes into consideration your activity on whatever social media outposts you tie to it - your Twitter account, LinkedIn profile, Facebook profile, blog (Wordpress.com, Tumblr), etc. The inner workings of how they come to a score (and what affects your score day-to-day) is not disclosed, so it's difficult for any of us to really understand. This is exactly what has caused so much of an uproar.

2 years, 8 months ago on My Advice to Klout

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@deleted_91832_Sean McGinnis I never thought much about my score either - it's other people I'm concerned about. The industry you an I are in puts a lot of emphasis on the concepts of influence and engagement. It scares me to think that someone might look at a person's score when deciding to hire them for a social media, marketing or PR position (or hiring an agency or consultant for a contract) and then make arbitrary decisions about their abilities based on that. We have no control over that (unless we opt out of Klout).

2 years, 8 months ago on My Advice to Klout

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You know, the gamification aspect of Klout doesn't bother me as much as how seriously people and organizations take Klout scores. Just like Google PR did, Klout scores have become a major business decision-making factor. Companies and agencies lose out on business, people lose out on getting hired for jobs, dogs and cats living together (mass hysteria!). Seriously though, we're talking major impacts on livelihoods, all based on this one number. This ain't a credit score, people. THAT's what bothers me most.

And @webby2001 is right - the score is what gets people to participate. BUT, what if the score was removed and the focus was put on how a person is influential - their topics, circles of influence, engagement levels, etc. You could still see how that person is influential without having to assign a number to it, and people might still be interested in participating.

2 years, 8 months ago on My Advice to Klout

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@ginidietrich I agree, and not only can they be held accountable, they ARE being held accountable.

There's also this traditional vs. non-traditional (new) media debate. We recently worked on a campaign with a "traditional" PR firm who brought us on to identify new media publishers (i.e. bloggers, other social media "influencers"). They had a rudimentary understanding of what "new media" encompassed, but didn't know what to look for or how to approach them. I think, though, that there will always be a need for both traditional and non-traditional; but PR needs to understand that there are different ways to work with each.

2 years, 8 months ago on Six Skills Every PR Pro Needs

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These all seemed like common sense to me, but mainly because I'm a marketer approaching PR from that perspective. The lines are blurring more and more, and you're absolutely right about integration. Not just integrating search with social and social with email, etc., but integrating roles and processes.

You're also right about measuring results. I've seen traditional PR firms fired because they couldn't demonstrate any solid results of their efforts - meaning those tied to business goals. Again, as a marketer, common sense to me because we're always expected to do this. How is it that PR got away with it for so long?

2 years, 8 months ago on Six Skills Every PR Pro Needs

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You know, this is the second article I've read this week about the perpetuation of negative stereotypes in women. The other article I read was about women being regarded as "crazy", "overly emotional/sensitive", etc. - referred to by the (male) author as "gaslighting." This is something I'm more familiar with and it resonates with me on a personal level. Here's the article: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/mobileweb/yashar-hedayat/a-message-to-women-from-a_1_b_958859.html

I think that women can be just as guilty of gaslighting toward other women as men are. @ginidietrich , the video you include has many examples of this - especially at the beginning with the female news reporter saying Hillary looked "haggard" and "92." Comments like those perpetuate insecurity in women - about their looks, intelligence and emotional stability. And documentaries like this are great for bringing the issue to light, but you're right that change has to start with us. Acting like victims and not making efforts to change ourselves, as well as the perception of people around us, is not going to do us any good.

BTW - I found out about the article I referenced above through an AWESOME group of very supportive women in the Washington, DC area called DC Web Women. I shared your article with them as well! :-)

2 years, 8 months ago on Women Are Our Own Worst Enemies

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I love it, especially the JC speech bubbles!

2 years, 9 months ago on The Launching of a New Brand Identity: Six Concepts to Consider

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@BdotW Good point! He was usually catching me when I did it in the same way as your second example - the period ended the whole sentence rather than the quoted part. So I've been right all along!

2 years, 10 months ago on 7 Words I Never Want To See In Your Blog Posts

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I love reading posts like this one. Not that I'm completely free of guilt on some of these (like "less" vs. "fewer"), but when I see people using the wrong form of a word (like their/there/they're), it drives me insane!

Something I see WAY too much is use of the word "loose" instead of "lose" (i.e. "Let's look at the map so we don't loose our way"). HATE that!

Here's an error that was once pointed out to me by a former boss, which I still make frequently: periods go inside of quotes rather than outside.

2 years, 10 months ago on 7 Words I Never Want To See In Your Blog Posts

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Wow, @Danny Brown - you're really on a tear about Klout lately, aren't you? ;-)

I used to be totally into the idea of Klout. On paper, it is kind of a good idea. But the whole thing is becoming more and more convoluted, and I'm just getting more and more disillusioned with it. Our scores depend on an algorithm, and algorithms are by no means perfect. There are lots subtle nuances of influence that just can't be quantified.

Most of our scores have dropped quite a bit today, and I fear that too many decision-makers are going to put all their eggs in the Klout-influence basket and someone won't get hired for something as a result. We're talking about a life-changing event hanging on an imperfect score! Joe Fernandez out to think about that and focus on developing an easy opt-out process - rather than on fixing an algorithm that's always going to be broken.

2 years, 10 months ago on A Letter to Joe Fernandez of Klout

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@ExpatDoctorMom Ah, yes - that came directly from the email Klout sent out.

2 years, 10 months ago on Business Smacks Down Klout

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@ExpatDoctorMom Sorry - which post do you disagree with? I don't mind you disagreeing, I'm just not sure which one of my comments it is. Once I'm clear on that, we can discuss! :-)

2 years, 10 months ago on Business Smacks Down Klout

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@ginidietrich Ugh, I hope companies aren't doing that. Even companies in the online marketing/social media space, who reasonably could take someone's Klout score into consideration, should know better than to place too much weight on it. That's like taking how many LinkedIn connections or Twitter followers you have into consideration for a job.

I wonder if any companies have ever considered offering up a job through Klout as a perk. ;-)

2 years, 10 months ago on Business Smacks Down Klout

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@Danny Brown Good point! If someone who retweets your blog post isn't considered influential enough by Klout, does that mean you're not influential?

I get what they're trying to do - creating the best possible algorithm to assign a numerical measurement to the concept of influence. Benefit of the doubt - that can't be the easiest thing to do, I'm sure.

2 years, 10 months ago on Business Smacks Down Klout

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Just saw this latest update from Klout regarding how they calculate score: http://corp.klout.com/blog/2011/10/a-new-era-for-klout-scores/

"The core premise behind our algorithms has always been that influence is the ability to drive action. We have tightened this concept even further in this release. You are not more influential because you tweet or use Facebook more, you are influential because you have an influential audience engaging with your content."

2 years, 10 months ago on Business Smacks Down Klout

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@EricaAllison@writingrenee Let's just hope that the companies hiring us aren't doing so based on our Klout score (and then pointing out to us that it's gone down while we've been busy working for them). ;-)

You know, as social media consultants, we've used Klout to illustrate to our clients how social engagement and their "influence", in a sense, has grown over a period of time. But that's all we use it for - an illustration. Never a hard measurement. There's always the caveat that Klout's algorithm is based on certain things and is not an end all, be all of social influence.

2 years, 10 months ago on Business Smacks Down Klout

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@EricaAllison Exactly my point - quality over quantity. More emphasis on the subsequent reaction rather than the initial action.

I wrote a post a few months back about what I thought Klout should be measuring (and how): http://www.tuvel.com/blog/2011/06/22/how-klout-should-be-measuring-social-media-influence/ It talks about measuring based on HOW OTHER PEOPLE are engaging with you and your content. Since then, some of what I mentioned they've done - kind of (mainly in the blog arena).

Pleasure to meet you, too! I'll be by more often!

2 years, 10 months ago on Business Smacks Down Klout

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Thank you, thank you,. THANK YOU for pointing this out! I've been extremely busy lately, but that's because business is picking up - better than NOT being busy, right? Then I receive those notifications that my Klout score has dropped because I'm not tweeting as much, and I can't help but feel a twinge of guilt. I thought I was the only one!

I get what Klout is doing with their business and their "influence algorithm", but it seems more focused on quantity than quality. I know part of it is calculated based on retweets, mentions, etc; but even then I can't move the needle unless I tweet more. I just don't want to be judged by how little I tweet because I'm busy with work (or other things, like family stuff).

2 years, 10 months ago on Business Smacks Down Klout

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I love this analogy, Ken! Especially since I've recently started making the treadmill a morning habit.

I can't tell you how much it frustrates me to come across a business where someone took the time to start a Twitter account, even tweeted a few things. 5 followers, no avatar and a year later, that's all there is. I think many businesses are afraid of social media and/or are clueless about what to do. Kinda like exercising - sometimes you have to really motivate yourself to get started, or even have a trainer show you the best way to get results.

I just wrote a post about this yesterday, so I think this is on the minds of many folks like you and I (hope you'll pardon the plug) - http://www.tuvel.com/blog/2011/09/15/2012-the-year-of-living-dangerously-with-social-media/

2 years, 11 months ago on 5 Reasons (and 5 Tips) Businesses Need to Exercise Their Social Media Muscle

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@Marijean They've always been that way, and yet LOADS of businesses (including big brands like Seattle's Best Coffee) have been doing rule-breaking Facebook promotions for that long as well. It's only been in recent months that I've seen an upsurge in blog posts about this topic, and I think Facebook realizes that not enough people are aware of these terms and there are too many businesses to crack down on. Or maybe that's wishful thinking on my part. ;-)

I am thankful, though, for bloggers like you who keep the masses informed about stuff like this. So much information in the social mediasphere, so little time! Question for you, though - if a business offers a discount for checking in via Facebook Places (like Gap did some months back), is that against the TOS?

3 years, 2 months ago on WTF? Friday: Four Facebook Mistakes Businesses Make

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I'm gonna go out on a limb here by giving most of these businesses the benefit of the doubt. I don't think they're necessarily doing it in spite of the rules, they're doing it because they're just blissfully unaware of them. Yes, I understand that it's the collective responsibility of the marketers and businesses to be aware of this stuff, but Facebook will frequently make changes to their TOS without most people knowing any better. It takes a while for those changes to eventually filter out to the masses. Blog posts like these are how most of us find this stuff out! :-)

Reminds me of a recent episode of "South Park" where everyone was appalled that Kyle wasn't reading the agreement that pops up every time he downloads an iTunes update. Hilarity ensues.

3 years, 2 months ago on WTF? Friday: Four Facebook Mistakes Businesses Make

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1) People with no tweets, no bio, nothin' ("Please follow me! I promise I'll be interesting...soon!").

2) People who claim in their bio that they can get you hundreds or thousands of followers, make you hundreds of dollars a day through tweeting, etc.

3) People whose photos don't look real (they all look like Paris Hilton or Ashton Kutcher) and are tweeting nothing but ads.

4) Bots

5) People who haven't tweeted in ages. It's really frustrating to see a business you frequent or want to patronize, and they haven't tweeted since their first tweet ("We're now on Twitter!" - posted 1 year ago).

3 years, 2 months ago on WTF? Friday: The Five People Who Make Me Nuts on Twitter

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@Danny Brown Good point, Danny!

3 years, 9 months ago on Don't Be a Twat Pirate

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You had me at "Twat" - interesting use of the word. Especially knowing how it's used in the UK.

I agree with you and think it is kind of douchebaggy to hijack hashtags for self-promotion, but I think that a lot of Twitter chats have evolved into Twitter communities that extend far beyond the confines of the hour-long chat. Therefore, I don't see the harm in using a Twitter chat hashtag on relevant content even when the chat isn't happening. #eventprofs is a great example of this - content relevant to event professionals is tagged with this all the time.

3 years, 9 months ago on Don't Be a Twat Pirate

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