Livefyre Profile

Activity Stream

I know not to post links, but this post backs John's points on UConn. Also, in 2012, of the top 60 athletic department revenues, there was only one non-power five conference school: UConn at #42

www.fixaccfootball.com

1 month, 2 weeks ago on If Division IV Comes, Which Schools Might Be Thrown A Lifeline?

Reply

Big Ten, I will see your 18-school, three division league and raise you:

 

EAST

Virginia Tech

NC State

Clemson

South Carolina

Georgia

Florida

 

CENTRAL

Kentucky

Tennessee

Vanderbilt

Alabama

Auburn

FSU

 

WEST

Missouri

Arkansas

Mississippi

Mississippi State

LSU

Texas A&M

 

These divisions would be competitively equal and actually make geographic sense (as would the Southeastern Conference as a whole).

 

Perhaps more importantly, it would alleviate the scheduling bottleneck that having just two divisions is creating.  Each team plays the others in their division (5 games), a permanent opponent from each of the other divisions (2 games) and a rotating opponent from each of the other divisions (2 games).  With this nine game schedule format, all cross divisional rivalries are maintained and each team gets guaranteed annual exposure throughout the league's footprint.

 

Dammit Slive, make it happen. SEC supporters want FSU and Clemson, period.  Virginia Tech and NC State will do more than enough to increase our television footprint, which would then cover all of the former Confederacy (with Kentucky and Missouri to boot).  Adding FSU and Clemson is about ENHANCING THE BRAND, and wrapping up the Florida market can't hurt either.

 

 

1 year, 5 months ago on Big Ten To Add More Conference Games; Is This Another Lure For UVA, GT, UNC And Duke?

Reply

I posted this here a few months ago and thought I'd post it again now.  (The only change is that I now include NC State instead of Georgia Tech.)

 

First and foremost, I think it's time for the SEC to protect its turf and enhance its brand.  It marketing and advertising (and TV contracts), it's all about the BRAND. I would add Florida State, Clemson, NC State and Virginia Tech for a total of 18, and then divide into THREE six-team divisions as so:

 

EAST

Virginia Tech

NC State

Clemson

South Carolina

Georgia

Florida

 

CENTRAL

Kentucky

Tennessee

Vanderbilt

Alabama

Auburn

FSU

 

WEST

Missouri

Arkansas

Mississippi

Mississippi State

LSU

Texas A&M

 

These divisions would be competitively equal and actually make geographic sense (as would the Southeastern Conference as a whole).

 

Perhaps as importantly, it would alleviate the scheduling bottleneck that having just two divisions is creating.  Each team plays the others in their division (5 games), a permanent opponent for each of the other divisions (2 games) and a rotating opponent from each of the other divisions (2 games).  With this nine game schedule format, all cross divisional rivalries are maintained and each team gets guaranteed annual exposure throughout the league's footprint.

 

The top two divisional champs (chosen by national rankings) would play in Atlanta for the SEC championship.  This improves the chances for a quality game - this setup would've had LSU and Alabama playing in Atlanta last season, not LSU and Georgia - and also lessens the chance that a top-rank team would not win its division (an argument that has been used against SEC teams in the past, and would be again at some point by the playoff selection committee).

 

Wow, SEC utopia.

 

1 year, 5 months ago on How An SEC-Big XII Scheduling Alliance Could Doom The ACC

Reply

Unbiased opinion on how this would play out:

 

Georgia Tech is going going to the Big 10. Tech's new AD just said that GT is more popular outside the South than inside it.  He's right, and joining the Big 10 plays into their new recruiting strategy. And it's a much better academic fit.

 

UNC and Duke will stick it out in the ACC as long as possible, but would then choose the Big 10 over the SEC.  They value their relationships with UVA and Maryland, and of course their academic reputations.  Not to mention the level of football play would be more to their liking.

 

So the SEC would pick up Virginia Tech and NC State.  Virginia Tech is the top priority for the SEC, regardless of what one report from Sporting News said.  Having a presence in Virginia and North Carolina accomplishes everything the SEC wants.

 

The Big XII would pick off Florida State, Clemson, Louisville and Miami.  The first three schools have already flirted with the Big XII, and Miami actually seems like the best fit of the four.  Pittsburgh, Notre Dame and BYU could also be in the mix.

 

The ACC adds UConn, Cincinnati, Temple, East Carolina, UCF and USF to become a 10-team conference, if anyone cares. (BC, UConn, Syracuse, Temple, Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Wake Forest, East Carolina, UCF, USF)

1 year, 6 months ago on How An SEC-Big XII Scheduling Alliance Could Doom The ACC

Reply

 @LifeLongGarnetGold Me either.   But could help pacify whining Gators.

1 year, 6 months ago on Big Bang Theories: The Countdown To Super-Conferences (Part 4)

Reply

 @NCarolina09  @JRsec Agreed.  Slive would need to be a bit more proactive to get the best options.  The SEC should counter Big 10 adding four (UVA, UNC, Duke, GT) by adding four of our own (VT, NCSU, Clemson, FSU) right out of the gate.  Football wise, I'd take our four over their four any day of the week.

1 year, 6 months ago on Big Bang Theories: The Countdown To Super-Conferences (Part 4)

Reply

 @JRsec And I'd add Clemson to the East and FSU to the West.  So the Gators can take solace from being the only state of Florida team in the East.  And the all of the West teams can celebrate having an annual state of Florida opponent to aid recruiting.

 

1 year, 6 months ago on Big Bang Theories: The Countdown To Super-Conferences (Part 4)

Reply

 @JRsec Or strengthen our brand (that's what television PARTNERS like most) by adding FSU and Clemson.  It also protects our turf from outsiders, but I don't think playing some defense is a bad thing -- especially when it enhances our brand.  And it is ALL about the brand.  The Big 10 didn't add Nebraska to corner the Omaha television market.  CBS and ESPN don't pay the SEC the big bucks because we have two schools in Alabama.  It's the quality of those teams and their football cultures that matter most.

1 year, 6 months ago on Big Bang Theories: The Countdown To Super-Conferences (Part 4)

Reply

At the end of the day, UNC and Duke would choose the Big 10 over the SEC for numerous reasons.  So I think we'll see UVA, GT, UNC and Duke join Maryland and land in the Big 10.

 

However, at the same time, you do have very real political ramifications to consider -- UVA cannot abandon VT; UNC and Duke cannot abandon NC State.  Therefore, I think we'll see a near simultaneous announcement that Virginia Tech and NC State are headed to the SEC.

 

Some might consider NC State the consolation prize in North Carolina, but you get what you get and it's a quality program with tremendous football upside.  In fact, the Virginia Tech / NC State football package would be very similar to the Texas A&M / Missouri football package.  Virginia Tech and NC State go to the SEC East and Missouri goes to the SEC West.  Nice, logical, value-added expansion for a total of 16 schools -- and that's it.

 

1 year, 6 months ago on Big Bang Theories: The Countdown To Super-Conferences (Part 4)

Reply

I doubt North Carolina politicians would allow any of the four ACC schools to leave without the others.  (They even have Wake Forest's back.)  Besides, why would any of them want to leave a conference that revolves around them and the state of North Carolina?  Just keep the league at 12 or more schools (and UConn and Cincy are eagerly waiting in the wings) and keep on, keeping on at the automatic qualifyer table.

 

On the other hand, Georgia Tech is ripe for the taking and is coveted by the Big 12 for its academics, television market and access to Southern football recruits.  Having the Big 10 in Atlanta would be a serious blow to SEC, period.  If given the chance, Georgia Tech would chose the natural rivalries in the SEC over Big 10 membership - and wisely so.  And don't underestimate Tech's academic value to the SEC as well.  (Tech-Vanderbilt would be an ideal, out-of-division permanent rivalry.)

1 year, 7 months ago on With Seven Schools Exiting The Big East, Get Ready For The Big Bang

Reply

First and foremost, I think it's time for the SEC to protect its turf and enhance its brand.  It marketing and advertising (and TV contracts), it's all about the BRAND.

 

I would add Florida State, Clemson, Georgia Tech and Virginia Tech for a total of 18, and then divide into THREE six-team divisions as so:

 

EAST

Virginia Tech

Clemson

South Carolina

Georgia

Georgia Tech

Florida

 

CENTRAL

Kentucky

Vanderbilt

Tennessee

Alabama

Auburn

FSU

 

WEST

Missouri

Arkansas

Mississippi

Mississippi State

LSU

Texas A&M

 

These divisions would be competitively equal and actually make geographic sense.

 

Perhaps as importantly, it would alleviate the scheduling bottleneck that having just two divisions is creating.  Each team plays the others in their divisions (5 games), a permanent opponent for each of the other divisions (2 games) and a rotating opponent from each of the other divisions (2 games).  With this nine game schedule format, all cross divisional rivalries are maintained and each team gets guaranteed annual exposure throughout the league's footprint.

 

The top two divisional champs (chosen by national rankings) will play in Atlanta for the SEC championship.  This improves the chances for a quality game - this setup would've had LSU and Alabama playing in Atlanta last season, not LSU and Georgia - and also lessens the chances that a top-rank team would not win its division (an argument that has been used against SEC teams in the past, and would be again at some point by the playoff selection committee).

 

Wow, SEC utopia.

 

1 year, 7 months ago on With Seven Schools Exiting The Big East, Get Ready For The Big Bang

Reply

 @John at MrSECUntil now, there has been no mention of Georgia making the national title game, and it only happened in this article because of the Bama loss and under a Bama headline.  Even last week, this site only listed Bama as a national title contender and Georgia was lumped in the Top 25 category.  I suspect that will change this week -- and then ask why did it change?

 

My bigger point is that we remember what happened in 2007 and we fully understand why it happened.  We get it.  We also know how lightly regarded we've been this season.  Yes, we had a horrible game against USC, but there's no way Oregon, Kansas State or Notre Dame could survive the physically abusive SEC without a loss.  Unfortunately, the national media does matter - especially ESPN - so we do have to start making an effective argument for ourselves.  It's a pro-SEC argument.

 

Anyhow, I love this site and I hope that my points are taken in the thought-provoking context for which I intend.

 

 

 

1 year, 8 months ago on SEC Still Has Slim Title Hopes After Short BCS Drop For Bama

Reply

As I said just after the Bama game, Georgia benefits from the Bama loss because the Bama-loving media - including Mr. SEC - will now open the conversation to get a one-loss SEC champ into the National Championship game. Georgia benefits by being in the same boat as Bama.  And sure enough, within hours, ESPN's Mark May is talking up the possibility of Alabama OR GEORGIA making it to the title game.  Discussions like this were not happening last week, and you can be darn sure that Mark May was not building up Georgia until that moment.  So the immediate benefit is that Georgia is now getting talked up in order to make a win by Bama in the SEC title game look more impressive, but the bigger benefit to Georgia is that they are forced to include group Alabama and Georgia together in the "should a one-loss SEC champ play for the national title" argument.  Instead of collateral damage, call it collateral benefits.

 

Now, if Georgia does beat Alabama and the Dawgs need to plead their case, do NOT put Mark Richt in front of the TV cameras.  In 2007, when it was low-key Richt making his case against enthusiastic Les Miles, he was steamrolled.  Instead, put Todd Grantham in front of the cameras and let him talk about Georgia having the best defense in the country and how the team is on a roll and can beat anybody in the country.  Yes, make it a challenge.  And Of course, talk about how illegitimate a national championship game without the SEC would be.  Would the Oregon-KSU winner REALLY be the best team in the country?  College football fans are going to be CHEATED by not having the SEC - the true litmus test - in the title game.  If you don't beat the SEC to win the national title, you have cut corners and are a fraud.  Saban will effectively make this case if Bama wins the SEC, so we need to begin planning our campaign - with Grantham - as well in case we win the SEC.  I hate the spin factor too, but it's real - just ask Saban, Miles and Meyer.

1 year, 8 months ago on SEC Still Has Slim Title Hopes After Short BCS Drop For Bama

Reply

Georgia State has tremendous potential.  Georgia, with 10.5 million people, has only Georgia and Georgia Tech, and Tech doesn't really count (just ask Dan Radakovich).  Compare this to Alabama, a state with 4.5 million people and four FBS programs (Alabama, Auburn, UAB and Troy).  Georgia State is in the Atlanta mega-media market and plays its home games in the Georgia Dome (likely followed by the new Falcons stadium in 2017).  The right coach and a few seasons of success can earn it Big East membership. 

1 year, 9 months ago on USC's Ward Won't Rule Out A Move To Georgia State, If Offered

Reply

Uh, so, you do realize that LSU and Georgia are now ranked higher than Florida in the BCS, right?  In this week's video recap, you still think only Alabama and Florida have a chance to meet for an all-SEC national championship game and then layout a three-fer scenario for Florida (LSU beating Bama, Ole Miss or Auburn beating Georgia, then Florida beating LSU for SEC championship) to get them to the national championship game versus Alabama.  That is quite the stretch for the ol' Gators, sir.  A more feasible scenario might have Georgia winning out, including an upset in the SEC championship, only to be rematched with one-loss Alabama for the national championship.  Or, LSU winning out and playing one-loss Alabama for the national championship (sound familiar?).  Both are more likely than your Florida triple ding dong scenario.

1 year, 9 months ago on MrSEC.com Power Rankings - 10/30/12

Reply