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@dexteryz @patrick2 two potential approaches: you buy at an audience size/change of rate (in advance) in order to lock in favorable pricing if something explodes; the inventory has flexible pricing that escalates (or is bid up) as traffic rate is increasing.

the two may not need to be mutually exclusive.

1 year, 3 months ago on Search traffic vs. social traffic — It’s not equal

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@dexteryz yes.
1 million visits to an article, based on a shared-awareness (e.g. social traffic) is  manifesting a different intent by users than is shown by 1 millions visits driven by search (assuming the search hits are not mistakes, based on misleading keyword strategies). in the former case, the "visitor" didn't know the content existed prior to seeing the initial sharing of it, therefor they weren't aware of the need of the specific information. search is the opposite of this model.

You can't predict what will be interesting to people and therefore shared by social networks. that said, having an ad model that is based on spot-price limits for audience sizes and is triggered automatically by changes in audience growth rates over short time frames is interesting (although I am sure it's been thought of...)

1 year, 3 months ago on Search traffic vs. social traffic — It’s not equal

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businesses fail. always have, always will. it's stupid to think that because some in this sector are wildly successful, that all have the potential to be. i don't think it's "selling the soul" as much as ignorance of the probability of failure and what investors will expect/demand you to do with their money.

1 year, 4 months ago on It’s easier than ever to sell your soul

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perhaps we should remind ourselves of the forgotten yet obvious truth: this is a world wide web of browse-able information running on the Internet now accessed beyond the limits of the desktop PC. once you put information into this system, it is largely out of your control.

Add to this the another forgotten yet obvious truth: these services that we use, largely for free, are in the business of making money or convincing investors that they have the potential to make money, through providing services around data/information. to this end, these services will need to continually redefine what they are doing to stay viable and/or relevant.

if you want privacy, control, consistency of ethical stances, you should probably reconsider how you use the services in this medium. to expect otherwise shows a lack of understanding of how the medium functions. yes, it would be "nice" if things worked differently, but then it wouldn't be the Internet and these services would probably cost more than we'd want to pay.

1 year, 5 months ago on The Facebook-ification of Path and Instagram is at least partly our fault

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@DouglasCrets 

Exactly. Yahoo! is buying popularity not market position.

The meaningful stats that are not referenced is the change in churn rate over time  (becoming popular to people that don't know you is only good if you are remaining popular with the people that do know you).

1 year, 5 months ago on Yahoo didn’t buy Tumblr. They bought Tumblr’s market position

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the odds of failure of a new business don't necessarily change just because it is social or digital. often these traits mask the fact that there is no real need being served, or no actual, sustainable business model. the social/digital attributes often lead people to conclude that true need or business model are unimportant and can be developed later (or will magically emerge). the focus on experience also misdirects, as in: if we simply do it better or in a more engaging way, customers will come...this is not meant to suggest that the category doesn't have potential or that there isn't opportunity to consider. but at the end of the day, if you aren't bringing in more money (either revenue or investment) than you are paying out, a business is not sustainable.

1 year, 11 months ago on The travel startup fallout is here. Will anyone survive?

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"Maybe I’ve gotten busier since then. Or maybe in practice, the rewards just aren’t exciting enough."This is the key point. If there isn't enough value for the customer/user, the novelty will eventually wear off and use will drop off as well. The challenge is to sustain a monetizable value proposition (which can actually be very difficult to do), not just have a fun app. 

2 years ago on Shopkick totally recreates its shopping app. Gamification out, design and content in

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