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Interesting that for Candidate 1 you rate their blog a 10, but their writing a 4. Was the blog score more about their network and which bloggers / blogs they knew and read vs their actual production on a blog? 

 

Especially with "digital babies" / millenials, the online social networks are a commodity. If you're a 20-something college student and don't have a Facebook friend list approaching 1000 -- especially if you plan on working in social media or PR -- that should cause a second look. But, someone having a lot of friends on Facebook is equivalent to being able to turn on a computer. 

 

When all the social hype fades, it really all comes down to the basics: time management, customer service (both internal and external), and writing. Everything else is just a tool in how they get the job done. 

1 year, 10 months ago on Bubble Watch: Which employee would you hire?

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Paul - One thing to consider is that Aurora is only 30 miles away from Columbine. The teenagers and young adults have lived for the past 13 years with the lexicon of mass murder being part of their daily lives. The personal chronicling of their lives on social media has definitely added to their ability to articulate circumstances in their lives -- even in the face of tragedy. 

2 years, 4 months ago on Lights, Camera, Reaction: When Did Eye-witnesses to Horror Become So Disturbingly Articulate?

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A few years ago, my email & Facebook were hacked. It was the scam where the person claims you're trapped in a foreign country and can't use your phone but need $500 wired right away. 

 

Thankfully, my friends were smart enough to recognize this wasn't me and no one was "harmed" by the incident (although it took me nearly two weeks to get control back of all the accounts the person messed with). 

 

I'm sorry that your situation was more insidious and obviously meant to cause you some sort of personal harm. 

2 years, 4 months ago on Facebook Hacking and the Value of Social Currency

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About 10 years ago, I was working for an technology equipment manufacturer. We built equipment for the DSL market. One day, my boss showed up at my desk and had me pull up a website that listed equipment for sale -- it was our equipment, only with a different name. And, they hadn't been very imaginative. Our name was "Copper Mountain" and they had changed it to "Cooper Mountain". They had bought some of our stuff on the resale market and they were selling it as their own. They were also making some knockoff versions and just putting their "Cooper Mountain" logos on them.

 

The really funny part was that they had also take our data sheets, white papers and other marketing material from our website and used some interesting Photoshop skills to change the "logo" and  wording from "Copper Mountain" to "Cooper Mountain". Our lawyers got involved, and they eventually changed things and then got out of the business all together. 

2 years, 5 months ago on Brandjacking—What’s Mine is (Not) Yours

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 @TCoughlin I was just about to ask the same question. If an email was "text-only", that shouldn't impact the open rate since most wouldn't realize the message was text only until after they had already opened it. Whether they clicked on the button to turn on images is another metric to test, but that still wouldn't be an open rate metric ... it would be "open rate" + "taking additional action to turn on images". Right? 

2 years, 8 months ago on Do Mostly-Text Emails Work?

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Personally, I've been making a concentrated effort to leave my phone in my purse or put away in social situations. Case in point was on Sunday night when I had some folks over for dinner and only touched my phone once the 3 hours they were here (and that's because I was using it as a timer to finish part of dinner). 

 

The "always on" nature of social networks means that people have to find personal balance that works for them. It's not easy and given apps like Highlight, Path, Instagram and others, it's just going to get trickier. 

2 years, 8 months ago on Sharing vs. Living in the Moment

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Jay - Sorry to hear about the loss of your brother. Good for you for choosing to focus on your health. The book idea will still be around next year, and probably even better because I'm sure it will be one of those things ruminating in the back of your brain over the next several months, but making your health a priority now will only have dividends when you do tackle the book next year.

2 years, 9 months ago on Why I’m Not Writing a Book This Year

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I think your former avatar represented you and the work you did very well. You were the "community guy" for a hip tech company.

Now, you're trying to get people -- including those representing large organizations -- to write *you* a check. Something more professional, but still personable and approachable, was more appropriate.

(I was actually going to make a comment like this via Twitter the other day when I saw the avatar switch.)

3 years, 1 month ago on First Impressions, Online, Matter

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i agree. if you're already using tweetdeck then @bufferapp is probably redundant and adds extra steps. If you mostly use the web for twitter - like I have been lately - buffer and the chrome extension are awesome together.

3 years, 1 month ago on Holy Twit – Increased Tweet Volume Drives Results

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I love Buffer. One of the things I like most about it is that you can schedule your tweets to buffer at times when you're going to be online anyway. I've used other tools in the past that try to space out tweets, but they often wind up sending them at times you're not online and can't engage.

3 years, 1 month ago on Holy Twit – Increased Tweet Volume Drives Results

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I was invited to last year's #DellCap event, but wasn't able to attend due to really horrible personal timing. I'm a huge fan of Dell's products (I own three laptops). I was really bummed a few months ago when I found out that Dell wouldn't be selling the 10" Streak to the US market. I had put off buying a different table in hopes that the Streak would be available.

I think Dell has learned a lot from social media -- from early problems to not responding to user complaints, to actually monetizing the use of social media, to brand awareness and things like DellCap. Glad to see they are taking the industry lead on things like this.

3 years, 4 months ago on #DellCap 2011 Review: The Future is Now

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I agree and I disagree with you. A) I think a six-week course charging over $1000 is ridiculous at this point. Especially since business profiles haven't been rolled out and everything is still in beta. However, a 2 hour webinar giving people advice on how to set up their profiles, who to link to, how to build circles - aka the basics - is a smart idea. And, if @chrisbrogan is distilling all that information down in to a 2 hour webinar and people find it valuable, why shouldn't he get paid for his time?

3 years, 4 months ago on Beware the Google+ Experts

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@ginidietrich @jaykeith I think it's less about the linkbait / traffic and more about the theme I keep hearing from tech reporters / bloggers and that is the "Woe is me. We get so many crappy pitches and we're so overworked. Here, let us show you an example of the type of crap we have to deal with on a regular basis."

3 years, 8 months ago on Where Is the Professionalism In PR?

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I do think that Timothy Johnson made a huge mistake in sending the email, but I can understand his frustration. As someone who does internal PR for a tech company in the Silicon Valley, it's really tricky not to want to send emails like that every day.

You have a small number of publications, like TechCrunch, who seem to be making decisions (that at times can be seen as arbitrary) about what news they're going to cover and what news they're going to ignore. You have TechCrunch reporters who have inboxes that are flooded with messages and can't respond to a majority of pitches they get, and then you have clients (or CEOs) wanting to know why you didn't get that TechCrunch coverage. It's fairly easy to get frustrated and want to scream to the heavens -- or the twitter stream -- about it.

While his tone was bad, I actually thought it was good that he sent it via email and not a public rant on Facebook, Twitter or a blog.

3 years, 8 months ago on Where Is the Professionalism In PR?

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Gini, While I have to agree with you when it comes to book sales, for other small business owners what Chris says makes a lot of sense.

How many restaurants and other small businesses could value from paying more attention and engaging with their customers? If a customer checks in to your restaurant, they are looking to establish a relationship with your business. Why not say hi and ask them about how their experience was and whether or not they liked the food?

Why aren't more businesses listening on Foursquare and Twitter to what people are saying? I posted a couple of tweets saying that I was looking for a venue in San Francisco to host a meetup. It was a perfect opportunity for a bar, restaurant, or other location to step up and say "hey, we have space, what night are you looking to host your event?" While I got a few suggestions from a few local friends, no business tweeted me back. Big opportunity lost.

You're right, certain authors like Chris could probably find a better use of their time that would make them $10k instead of the $10 from a book sale, but it might be something worth trying out. (And, you never know ... one of those people that you sell your $10 book to in the bookstore might be willing to pay the $22k figure to have you come out and do a day's worth of consulting with their business. But, you would have never known if you hadn't established the relationship.)

3 years, 10 months ago on Why Brogan’s Bigger Ear Marketing Is Wrong

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One other thing, something that Scott Stratten talked about that I tried to put in to action for me personally at Blogworld, is that I tried to be relatively disconnected when I was having "social time". I made a conscious effort if I was standing and talking with someone to not have my blackberry in hand at the same time, and I also made an effort when I sat down in one of the sessions (or when someone sat down next to me if I was already sitting there) to engage with them and not just be buried in my laptop. It definitely helped me meet some amazing people.

4 years, 1 month ago on The Shift Is Coming

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@LewisHowes It only took me four times of actually seeing you to talk with you.

For me, the part about online that makes things easier for me is the "jumping into conversations". I haven't been able to translate that in my offline interactions. For example, I'm super comfortable commenting on most people's blogs, jumping in to the middle of a comment thread to give my opinion, seeing a conversation on Twitter and putting in my two cents, engaging with people in the comments section on Facebook. But, it's almost torture for me to do something like that in real life. You were a pretty popular guy at Blogworld. Finding you standing alone would have probably been impossible, so I had to walk up to you while you were already in a conversation with two other people and become part of that conversation. Torture!

For me, it's partially not wanting to look stupid and worrying about whether or not I have something worthwhile to add to the conversation. It is kind of ironic, because what you say online is fairly permanent and not deletable in most cases, but I feel like there is a freedom to say the wrong thing, misspeak, etc. However, if I misspeak when I'm talking to someone in person, that haunts me.

4 years, 1 month ago on The Shift Is Coming

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To me it comes down to two things:
a) Are you willing to disclose in the post that you received a free ticket to the event?

b) Are you being truthful in what you say about the event?

Transparency and authenticity to me are the most important things. As long as you cover both, I'm okay with a promotional post.

4 years, 1 month ago on Blogging for Tickets. Am I Selling Out?

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