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@ClayMorgan This tip from John doesn't have to be competitive - it also works to target the followers of partners or other collaborators. We've seen great success with this!

1 month ago on Three Facebook Advertising Tactics to Reach Your Target Audience

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How cool and funny are Solo PR Pros? This is such a fun read!

3 months, 2 weeks ago on Outfit of the Day – Solo PR edition

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I love how you tie your business values into your broader views of the world and family, Mary. Congratulations to a shining Solo PR example and a leader in the public relations industry!

4 months, 3 weeks ago on Reflections on Life’s Journeys

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Well said! I'm a fan of the expression, "beauty is fleeting, but dumb is forever." If a woman in any profession builds her career on how she looks, it will be short-lived (you won't be the sweet young thang for long!). Anything that perpetuates the stereotype that PR pros all fall into this category does a disservice to the vast majority's high-level and strategic business acumen (certainly those who are successful long-term).


Oh, and some PR pros are men. Can you imagine anyone telling men in a "business" blog to draw whiskers on their face in concealer? My fellow females, stop the insanity!

6 months ago on PR Women: Stop Trivializing Our Work

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Great of you to share your experiences, Heather! When it comes to growth, I think it's a good idea for each entrepreneur to think about what that means to them. For PR pros, does growth mean you want to make more money as a consultant, or would you like to build a boutique firm, or are your goals to spearhead an even bigger agency? 

You knew early on you wanted to build an agency and grew your business quickly - a testament to the fact that the steps above work!

6 months, 3 weeks ago on 3 Tips for Business Growth

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Oh shoot - I forgot to mention one more tip in my comment: the importance of finding a collaborator who is nicer than you are. I'm not kidding! Aside from the obvious benefits of being pleasant to work with, a super-kind and tactful sidekick can help squash squabbles and be the good cop on those rare occasions when you may have to play enforcer. Karen Swim was already a much-loved community member, so adding her to the team was an easy decision for me!

7 months, 3 weeks ago on How to build and grow a private Facebook group

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Wow, Arik- thank you so much for all the kind words, and I couldn't have described the Solo PR Pro community better myself! We are a group that values the opportunity to learn from each other, and everyone is the better for it.


As a conference organizer, let me say that a huge part of the spirit of an event comes from the speakers. Selecting speakers who are not only wise and interesting, but also enjoy making new connections -- regardless of how well-known that new connection may be -- makes everyone attending feel comfortable and valued. I encourage anyone planning an event to invite speakers like Arik (there's a reason I made him present twice J) -- these quality people add value throughout your conference, not just while they're on stage.

Thanks again, Arik, for being part of it!

8 months ago on The 7 commandments of the Solo PR Summit

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My brain hurts. I still haven't figured out how the long-form results actually work, and now they've got us thinking in Q&As. But at least I understand it better than I did before I read this post. :-)

1 year ago on Hummingbird Update: What it Means for PR Pros

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 @arikhanson  Couldn't hit "like" on a comment that says the wife and kids will take a hit! But, I'm humbled that the Solo PR Summit is the one event you feel is worth it.

 

I think @CatParker 's comment about being a gypsy is a good one -- some people love the thrill of being somewhere new, while others prefer the comforts of home. Knowing which type you are can help you plan -- whether you want to embrace or avoid business travel.

 

1 year ago on The downsides of PR travel no one wants to talk about

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 @Danny Brown I think those of us who continue to blog regularly believe there is still power in the fragmented discussion, but it's harder to track and participate in (and, as @davefleet indicates, it

tends to be less in-depth than the blog comments of old). So I definitely understand why many find blogging less appealing than in the past.

 

1 year, 1 month ago on Where did all the good (individual) PR blogs go?

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Great points, Arik. There's an important aspect you didn't mention: most measures today (like the Inkybee list) reward frequency and volume. An individual blog by a mere mortal can't churn out enough content to make the top of a list like this (the agency behind Spin Sucks posts great content twice a day!), so there's pressure on individuals to add more guest bloggers, which can dilute the voice, as you say.

 

Not only does this emphasis on volume mean more formerly individual blogs have multiple authors now, but it also makes it harder for the public to unearth the new or unique voices of smaller blogs. So readership goes down, the author finds it less compelling to write as a result, and there's a chicken-and-egg effect.

 

The good news is, there's always room for fresh perspectives, and PR pros are a determined bunch! Lesser known bloggers are out there contributing to the conversation, and we can all help by making a concerted effort to shine a light on them.

 

1 year, 1 month ago on Where did all the good (individual) PR blogs go?

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 @davefleet The comment issue is a big one -- as the conversation has fragmented, it becomes more difficult to foster a dialogue around a particular topic of interest and feel like you're actually making an impact. Very few PR blogs have comment sections with any meaningful dialogue anymore.

1 year, 1 month ago on Where did all the good (individual) PR blogs go?

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This is a great post! I missed it earlier because I was out sick.. because I worked too hard, didn't sleep enough and a germ took me down. While I was offline, in between nose blowings, I was stunned to realize the world didn't come crashing down because I was out!

Shonali, we - and everyone commenting on and mentioned in this post - have been around long enough to see many social media high fliers come and go. Often, I can remember wishing those people hadn't burned themselves out...that I would prefer infrequent posts from them than none at all. Now I realize, this is us. :-)

Not only do we want things perfect, as you and Gini note, but many of us put so much pressure on ourselves around *volume.*  Yes, maybe we'll get more eyeballs the more we do, but that's quite the hamster wheel -- whether you have a team behind you or not. Since there's no limit to how much we can do on social media, we just have to set realistic boundaries for our sanity.


1 year, 1 month ago on Dear Business: Get Over the Social Media Hump

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I made a similar point about sister agencies on Solo PR Pro today. If prospective clients buy into the bigger is better philosophy being sold as part of this merger, many will be sorely disappointed. Independent solo and boutique firms (cough, Arment Dietrich, cough) are often light years ahead of the big guys in terms of creativity and innovation. Hear us now, believe us later!

1 year, 2 months ago on Seven Reasons the Publicis Omnicom Merger is a Big Deal

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This sounds like a racket! Why not let everyone and their brother speak, if you're going to get revenue from each of them?


Some small events can't afford to pay speakers a fee, and they should graciously understand if a desired speaker is too busy with paying gigs to accommodate them. But I have never heard of an event asking the speaker to pay to attend -- their unprofessional response is another example of the event's weirdness. Run awaaaay!

1 year, 2 months ago on Perspective: Public Speaking and Time as a Gift

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"Tracking time – every minute of it that is spent – allows you to be strategic and smart about the budgets you’re creating" - preach it, my friend! For solo PR pros, I recommend using 1,000 billable hours as the baseline when considering hourly rates, since we wear a lot of hats (ahem, @3HatsComm) and this typically translates into unbillable time. Keeping close tabs on time, even when billing on retainer, is the key to profitability.

1 year, 4 months ago on The Importance of Tracking Time and Other PR Firm Essentials

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 @Marc_Meyer1 Hey friend, since your comment appears at the top as the most recent, I wanted to record what we discussed via Twitter: you absolutely can take a vacation! I unplug completely for a minimum of one week every year (and have for my 18 years as an indie), usually 2-3 weeks a year, all while working with Fortune 500 clients. You just need to build a network of supportive colleagues, which fortunately isn't difficult to do.

1 year, 6 months ago on 5 reasons why the solo consultant lifestyle isn’t all it’s cracked up to be

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 @arikhanson It's funny, when I worked in a traditional office, I was always trying to power through my work so I could get home. I'm a very social person, but I typically skipped water cooler chit chat and group lunches. For those reading this post, if this is you... you'd make a great indie! :-)

1 year, 6 months ago on 5 reasons why the solo consultant lifestyle isn’t all it’s cracked up to be

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I'm not sure who made people think being an independent consultant is easy and glamorous -- maybe the same people who think PR is, too? J There's no such thing as a free lunch, and being an indie consultant is no exception. As the Solo PR blog/community founder, I'm admittedly a little more bullish on being indie than some, but there are some antidotes to a few of the downsides you describe...

 

For credibility (or cache, as Shonali notes), dropping the names of your clients goes a long way to help with that, but you're right that certain people will judge (says more about them than us, IMO). Vacations can be arranged if you have a trusted fellow indie to back you up (I usually unplug completely for at least one week each year), and it's possible to arrange your commitments so you can take that two week trip to Hawaii -- just not very often. And I personally love being a slob. J

 

I founded Solo PR specifically to help with the teamwork aspect, and many who aren't solo don't realize just how supportive we are of each other. However, there are some people who truly need lots of human contact and miss it greatly when it's not there. Those people are typically not cut out for this career path.

 

Overall, no disagreement -- you've nailed the primary pitfalls. But those of us who've been at it a long time (18 years for me!) have found ways to work around them, and the joys of working for clients you love on your own terms -- and usually for much more money than you'd make at a traditional job -- more than outweigh any downsides.

1 year, 6 months ago on 5 reasons why the solo consultant lifestyle isn’t all it’s cracked up to be

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You had me until the end when you said "takes a shower." :-) Fun post!

1 year, 8 months ago on So, God made a PR pro

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A lot of folks have always known PR is about more than media relations but, as you note in the comments below, a lot of folks does not equal everyone (and everyone in PR needs to get on board toute suite!). I don't think change is just scary- it also can be hard. Continually evolving and learning takes an investment of time, which some people don't want to give. Good for you for giving this well-worded prodding!

1 year, 9 months ago on The Future of PR: Beyond Media Relations

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Thanks for sharing, Gini! One thing I find interesting is that you closed most of the business when you had a chance to slow down and focus on that aspect of the biz dev. It shows how both networking hustle and focused follow-up are both necessary (the latter is too easy to put off for many folks). The fullest pipeline in the world does nothing unless you can ink the deal - congrats to you for capitalizing on all your hard work!

1 year, 11 months ago on How to Get Big Things Done

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Hi Arik- you know what? Over the past 24 hours, I'm on my way to changing my position on this issue. Yesterday, I felt that as long as people were expressing their opinions respectfully and with reasoned arguments, it's not a bad thing (and perhaps even a healthy part of democracy).

 

But today, not only am I shocked by some of the discourse on Facebook in particular, but I have a very personal example of how our political comments can be offensive in ways we don't intend. Allow me to share:

 

In response to my FB post this morning about the vitriol, a former work colleague messaged to tell me that I've offended her in the past (so she felt I was being hypocritical). This is because after North Carolina voted in favor of the anti-gay marriage amendment earlier this year, my FB stream was full of people expressing "everyone in NC is an idiot"- type sentiment, so I posted something in support of the "good people" of NC who voted against it. 

 

It was more political than I usually am, and in my mind I was expressing a more moderate view (to not paint everyone in the state with the same broad brush). However, my friend read this to mean that those who voted for it were "bad people" (and in her memory, that's what I said: "you proclaimed that those of us who prevailed were the bad people of NC"). I understand that what I said was snarky, and now I can see how this was the implication.

 

So, here I've shared in a more public way a bit about my politics, but I think it's a good example of what you're talking about. What I've decided is this: social media makes it necessary to boil the complexities of our positions down to a sentence or two, which makes things more divisive than they need to be.

1 year, 11 months ago on Should PR folks be sharing their political viewpoints on Facebook?

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 @commammo @ScottSchablow You're both right, of course. Good reminder that common sense and legal ramifications are not one and the same!

 

1 year, 11 months ago on AT&T Loses Case; News Release Held Under Paid Advertising Laws

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I'm going to be the devil's advocate here, and say that - while I get where everyone is coming from re: the historical event -  I also understand Mr. Yeager's point. They could have referenced the breaking of the sound barrier without using his name. I believe the company was, in fact, trying to affiliate their new technology with the impressive reputation of Chuck Yeager (without compensating him for doing so).

 

As a silly example, I could say "X years ago, Gini Dietrich founded the Spin Sucks blog (sorry, I don't know exactly how long it's been!). Today, Kellye Crane is [insert something relatively unrelated]." I don't think anyone would find that kosher.

 

Regardless of where we stand on this particular issue, it's an important update/reminder - thanks for keeping us in the know, Gini.

1 year, 11 months ago on AT&T Loses Case; News Release Held Under Paid Advertising Laws

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 @AmandaOleson This is the second strong recommendation for Woobox I've seen this week. Good to know - thanks!

2 years ago on What’s the best app for linking your Pinterest page to your Facebook page?

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Great roundup, Arik! I've been poking around the recommendations feature, trying to figure out if it impacts search results (i.e., will a person with more recs for a particular skill rank higher when that skill is searched for?). I don't see that it's necessarily the case now, but I'd assume that's where it's going. Did you come across anything on this in your research?

2 years ago on How do LinkedIn’s new enhancements grade out for brands/users?

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Wow- what a cool thing this is! I don't know Allen as well as I'd like, but she's one of those people who's always freely sharing her smartness online, making you want to know her more. Congrats to Gini on an exciting hire, and look forward to hearing more from Allen on the AD team!

2 years, 1 month ago on #FollowFriday: Allen Mireles

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 @ginidietrich We weren't talking about Chick-fil-A on the #solopr chat, but since @cloudspark mentioned it, I thought I'd share that I've learned a couple things (which relate to this post) over the past week, too: 1. You can't have a completely non-partisan discussion online about anything related to politics (even if the issue seems PR-only to you); 2. Even if 90-95% of the discussion is non-partisan, people will focus on the parts that are; and 3. If you raise an issue, *everyone* who is offended - on both sides - will blame you. Lessons learned!

2 years, 2 months ago on Blogging Mistakes Equal Lessons Learned

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Love that you always share with us the bumps along the way -- congrats on this new chapter!

2 years, 5 months ago on Arment Dietrich Creates Partnership with Thornley Fallis

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Fun post. Best part is, as I read it, you're moving to Atlanta - smart move! You forgot to mention all the fabulous people here. :-)

 

(Disclaimer: for anyone reading this comment who didn't carefully read the post above, he didn't actually say that.)

2 years, 6 months ago on 8 realizations while unplugging for a week

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Love that you pulled back the covers here, Jay! I find it especially interesting that you've defined what you want from the blog first, and then you look at the audience. Having a laser focus on one's audience is critical, but taking a step back to ensure you're doing it in a way that gets you where you want to go is what determines success. I can do a better job of the latter, so thanks for the guidance!

2 years, 6 months ago on Redesigning Your Blog to Drive Reader Behavior

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Once a solo PR pro, always part of our community! You're a shining example of how we're all the architects of our own careers -- each person's path will be different. Can't wait to see what comes next in your next chapter!

2 years, 6 months ago on Change: It’s A-Comin’

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Thanks for sharing some of the tools available to accomplish each of your points, @kamichat  (a couple are new to me)! I got on the data bandwagon a couple years ago when Katie Paine told me the top PR university programs are requiring statistics. As @allenmireles notes, it's part of our required skillset now, and it's time the veterans (ahem) in our field hop on the bandwagon -- it's actually a great opportunity!

2 years, 6 months ago on Big Data: Five Essential Skills for Public Relations to Master

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Great points about how entrepreneurs can be scrappy and forego what larger companies feel are necessities. I'd add one more item to the optional list: employees. Especially initially, using a network of highly qualified subcontractors can give a lot of flexibility to a growing business (and it makes adding team members a little less scary!). From solo PR pros to virtual assistants, independent contractors are available for almost any need -- I've run my virtual PR agency for 16 years this way.

2 years, 7 months ago on Making the Leap from Executive to Entrepreneur

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@Shonali "Selective sharing" - so true. BTW- shared this post with my husband -- even non-PR pros can learn from the information you've laid out here so well. Thanks!

2 years, 8 months ago on 7 PR Lessons Komen for the Cure Didn’t Know It Was Giving You

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Really appreciate the close look you've given this situation here, Shonali. Another lesson I've learned is that people on both sides of a highly emotional debate will skew facts/figures to suit their point of view. I find this funny (not funny ha-ha), because I believe most people would continue to feel just as strongly (on both sides) with the *truth.*

PR pros (and the media) have an ethical obligation to put the facts in plain view, and then you can explain them in ways that support your cause. As you wisely note, Komen should have been more transparent about what it was doing -- the perception that they were saying one thing and doing another is a credibility problem they may not be able to reverse.

2 years, 8 months ago on 7 PR Lessons Komen for the Cure Didn’t Know It Was Giving You

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Jay, you've been in my thoughts many times in recent weeks -- this post, and your shifting focus, is an amazing tribute to your brother. Thank you so much for sharing these lessons learned with all of us (I needed this reminder too, and I'm sure I'm not alone). Always remember: you have a very large cheering section! :-)

2 years, 8 months ago on Why I’m Not Writing a Book This Year

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I like what you find "fascinating," Arik -- most on this list are stretching themselves beyond their comfort zone, and I'm honored to be included. This post has introduced me to a few new folks, and let's hope the "we'll see what happens next" questions you pose for each end up with a positive outcome! :-)

2 years, 9 months ago on The 13 most fascinating people (in digital PR/marketing) in 2012

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Excellent insights here, Jay. I had no idea you were an entrepreneur from the word go. It took me a few years of working for the Man before I realized being a solo PR pro was the only way to go for me (I started consulting at 26, which sounded young to me until I read this post!). I think the fact that you've always been outside the mainstream gives you a unique perspective -- thanks for sharing!

3 years, 1 month ago on 6 Takeaways From 23 Years as a Consultant

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Any day @ginidietrich calls you an extraordinaire at anything is a good day! :-) Thanks for the shout, and for sharing your recommendations. I'm enjoying reading the comments and learning about a few new blogs to checkout. Thank you SpinSucks smarties!

3 years, 2 months ago on Three Blogs You Must Read

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This post makes many great points, but the thing I love best is that you call us all out. Even those of us who don't obsess about numbers have to admit to looking at them from time to time. The "culture of comparison" can cause us to focus on a phantom reality, and that's something to be very wary of. Thanks for the mention, BTW!

3 years, 2 months ago on 5 Reasons Social Media Measurement is Making You Lie to Yourself

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@TrafficColeman You are funny! Here's the thing: I've been to a lot of events, and I find that too many are dominated by vendor presentations. Consultants who blog, agencies, and in-house social media practitioners tend to have experience with a breadth of tools and approaches -- that's who I personally prefer to hear from.

3 years, 2 months ago on Two great Content Marketing and Social Media events to check out in September

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Thanks for sharing info about the Social Media Integration Conference (SMIATL), Mack. It's a unique event because in-depth sessions are offered in a university setting, with attendance limited to 300 registrants, so attendees really get intimate, 1:1 interaction with both the speakers and each other. Plus, there's the low cost! I'm happy to be working with them because I know it's one of the best bang-for-the-buck events all year.

And congrats on being part of the Content Marketing World schedule -- looks like a star-studded event!

3 years, 2 months ago on Two great Content Marketing and Social Media events to check out in September

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This is a really smart post -- I think you've hit on something here. Perhaps everyone is a bit more ornery than usual (not only are we having to work when we'd rather play, but the heat is enough to make anyone cranky!).

I'm a big proponent of vacations and taking regular breaks, which should not be taboo. Everyone gets more done when they're rested and refreshed, and the social media fatigue will probably abate as a result.

3 years, 2 months ago on Social Media Fatigue or Summertime Blues?

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@Shonali I'm glad you highlighted our exchange as an example of a healthy disagreement between friends. Strong relationships can certainly survive a difference of opinion, and I'm like you -- what a dull existence it would be if I only surrounded myself with homogenous people and points of view!

One source of conflict I've seen: some folks' need to assign nefarious motives to those who do things differently. If you find someone overly promotional or engaging in social media in a way you dislike, does that mean they're a bad person? Of course not! Is someone who writes a post disagreeing with a person or tool only doing so to pump up their traffic? Um no, they might just simply disagree. Yet the bullies often seem to jump to these conclusions.

I believe these conclusions are what sometimes divide the social media world into cliquish camps, and -- as I noted in my response to Jen -- that helps no one.

3 years, 2 months ago on On Social Media Bullies

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@jenzings You've articulated perfectly the reason we all suffer from bullying, even if it's indirectly. When wise voices are silenced because they don't have the bandwidth to suffer through and respond to the gang-up that might happen by speaking out, the "us vs. them" mentality does its greatest damage.

3 years, 2 months ago on On Social Media Bullies

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Great post, Mikinzie! I think you've nailed it when you say that so far the shiny object syndrome has ruled many of the decisions around QR codes. There are actually some good, interesting uses of them, but marketers without clear understanding and objectives may sour the end user experience to the point that they kill the technology completely. I hope that doesn't happen, since interactive codes can be useful -- *if* used correctly.

3 years, 2 months ago on Should You Use a QR Code?

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@deleted_91832_Sean McGinnis Hi Sean- I appreciate the way you've made your argument here. I'm one of the "critics," but of course we all know not everyone will agree (as with anything in social media!).

A less reasoned approach is to accuse those who disagree of making you throw up. I think it's funny to see Dino assert that my post was designed to drive readership, when I have many other posts in the past six months that far surpass the Triberr piece. Comments do not equal traffic, and traffic does not equal influence, which should go without saying.

I understand that it must be hard for a startup's founders to see their product met with less than uniform acceptance. We're debating these folks' livelihood -- I get that -- and I believe that's the source of the throw up.

3 years, 3 months ago on The Benefits of Triberr

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Enjoy hearing who your "3 people" are! Like you, I'm a fan of Gini and Don (though not sure I've read all of the posts you reference above; time to get busy!). However, I haven't been following Ramon. That's why I think posts of this type are useful -- we're all pulled in so many directions, it's impossible to know all the powerful voices out there. Thanks for sharing!

3 years, 3 months ago on Three people you must read

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