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@labraham400 That's a common opinion and one I shared until I realized that many women are not yet as fortunate as myself in their careers. My own experience doesn't include any deeply affecting or particularly traumatic incidents of sexism. I've had the odd married man hitting on me aggressively in the workplace and expecting me to keep his secrets from the boss AND the wife, or the man across the boardroom rephrasing my idea and claiming it as his, but nothing awful. But, that doesn't invalidate the very different experiences of many women. 


Women who are parenting are particularly still vulnerable to a double standard -- I was thinking of this today, in fact. I was shocked to learn that a friend who is a PhD has dramatically reduced her work hours to start a more flexible, self-employed career that will allow more parenting time. Then I thought about it more and realized that if she were a man, she'd have described it as a choice to pursue her entrepreneurial instincts, and I'd have applauded her ambition -- but gender roles prompted her to phrase what's actually likely to be a *harder* job as "I quit my job to be home with my kids more," and that caused me to immediately feel critical, rather than cheer her risk-taking as she leaps into self employment.


That's not to say there aren't much bigger inequities in the workplace than between just men and women. Disability accommodations are a particularly lacking feature in most occupations. But there is still a lingering, and worth-discussing, gender issue.

2 months, 1 week ago on Gender Roles: Is it Really a Man’s World?

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I'm only butting in because Gini was disappointed by the lack of pitchforks ;) read this in a friendly, "hey, i'm recommending you read this book, too, since you're interested in the subject" tone, please -- I think the author of the original post sounds like quite a lovely person, and "foster father" is an immediate love bond for me in his bio -- I'd like to be a foster parent one day myself.


Onward to the gentle, blunt-tipped pitchfork-nudging:

I'm always a little concerned when people use the college degrees stat to argue that men are in some way falling behind. Are we really still sold on the idea that college is the only route to an education and a life? Something like 97% of stay-at-home parents are still mothers, so it's probably not that men are choosing homemaking over work. Perhaps more men are finding on the job training, trade schools, apprenticeships, and military service useful enough to start their career, rather than going to a formal college. 


NPR did a piece around 2010 that scoped out the lifetime earnings and debts predicted for college graduates and various other paths, and found that many scenarios without a college degree look better financially in the world of today -- when you count in college debts and decreased retirement savings for many years due to paying off student loans, a cheap trade school with moderately high earning potential is the better bet, financially. An auto mechanic who finishes training without debt in one year is going to retire with more in the bank than an awful lot of college graduates.


As long as I'm kibitzing about statistics (Gee, maybe I should have gotten a college degree in THAT!) I may as well point out that an awful lot of studies on the impact of absent fathers don't control for the difference in family income in two-parent vs. single-parent households. Especially for families who were barely skirting above the poverty line with two parents, one parent walking out can introduce an enormous source of stress for children as the remaining parent falls into poverty, bringing housing insecurity and hunger into play, as well as lack of access to health care, behavioral care, and all those other supports and services that help children grow up healthy. (And, perhaps the fathers most likely to leave are also the fathers most likely to have abused their children or spouse before walking out? Also a trauma factor.)


I bring this up because these statistics are often used to encourage women to remain in abusive relationships by convincing them that their children can't thrive with a father outside the home (and as a victim advocate, I personally saw this keep women tied to physically abusive coparents). Portraying single parents as doomed to fail often leads women to sacrifice their own safety, believing that they are saving their children from a terrible fate. 


The reality, in my mind, is that the definition of a "family" is not as narrow as society's willingness to see a family can be. Some families are single parent headed; those families need different types of "village to raise a child" help than families which are two-parent headed. Some families are grandparent-headed. Some families consist of an older sibling raising younger siblings after the loss of BOTH parents -- and those families need a lot of help from the village. Some families are fortunate enough to have three or four parents, following remarriages by the biological parents and hard work by the stepparents to earn that role. And, these father/no-father dichotomy studies also ignore, for instance, kids with two fathers or two mothers.


There's some excellent work being done right now to apply pressure to include women and girls in the "My Brother's Keeper" program, which is currently limited to men and boys of color. You can read the letter here: http://aapf.org/2014/05/an-open-letter-to-president-obama/


The letter is intended to be signed and supported by prominent African-American men, but others can lend their support by informing their elected representatives of the letter and that they, the constituent, agree with the signers' belief that an intersectional and structural focus on youth achievement is needed in order to reduce the problems you cite, such as suicide, court-involvement, homelessness, dropping out, and running away.


That being said, again, this isn't intended as a critical call-out of the author; I'm actually pretty delighted to find that society is moving forward to the extent that conversations among men in the business world are no longer requiring women to validate our right to exist and work. It's a breath of fresh air to just quibble about the particulars, starting from the base assumption of gender equality as an absolute goal and aspiration for everyone. Even in my relatively short working lifetime, that hasn't always been the case!

2 months, 3 weeks ago on Gender Roles: Is it Really a Man’s World?

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Congratulations on a successful event! Hope to join you for the next one. Much love. Can't wait to talk with my team member, Tom, about his experience as a volunteer!

4 months ago on Reflecting on CMX Summit and the Future of the Community Industry

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@DavidSpinks I think you're quite right that aside from Product, these don't really work -- that being said, they can be decent stopgaps for companies still maturing into having community core to the organization. Tim McDonald has made the argument that all community teams should have a leader who reports directly to the CEO. I like that, although I wonder how much of my fondness for the idea is, of course, driven by the fact that I'm a community team leader and goodness knows everyone likes to hear their own worth to an organization praised and elevated! I think community can be done right through any organizational categorization if the leader in charge is up to the challenge... but it is much easier either in product or with a VP reporting directly to the C-suite.

4 months, 2 weeks ago on Does Community Fall Under Product, Marketing or Customer Service?

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@jayblackcomedy @jelenawoehr @MirandaM_EComm @AmyVernon  I think you're onto something, but you're looking at it backwards. The problem here is not with "people get angry so quickly." (I mean that can be A problem on Twitter--witness the death/rape threats directed at the creator of the #CancelColbert tag-but it's not THE problem.) I think the problem with the compose a great narrative vs. 12 second brain-fart disconnect you're identifying is that people will fat-thumb type for 12 seconds and then DEFEND IT as if it's Shakespeare. 


There's some sort of massive social disincentive, especially on Twitter, for saying "Nah really that was a stupid drunk tweet and I regret it," and not being someone who feels that way about my tweets, I don't personally know what it is. I could hazard some guesses; one that I'd put forward is that people are aware that the internet is permanent now, thanks to cached searches and the NSA, and they feel they have to find a way to stand behind EVERYTHING THEY'VE EVER DONE because they might be called out on it 50 years later.


I haaaaate the #sorrynotsorry hashtag and the culture around it, personally. Not because it's used for horrible behavior or anything... I've definitely never seen anyone post "just committed a terrible crime, #sorrynotsorry" (I'm sure it's happened and is on the Smoking Gun somewhere... but I digress) But the overall culture of "Let me post something mildly irritating and emphasize that I know I'm being mildly irritating" is just really reinforcing of the idea that Thou Shalt Stand Behind Every Tweet. 

5 months ago on Booth Babes Are Still A Thing, Apparently

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@jayblackcomedy @MirandaM_EComm @AmyVernon  You're going to a lot of trouble to understand his perspective here. I appreciate that. Empathy is a trait I really love in people, and I tend to reflexively try to find reasons to comprehend difficult behavior myself. When I was a very small child, I remember hearing my parents grumbling about a discourteous driver and piping up from my carseat to defend him with, "Maybe his wife is having a baby and he has to hurry to the hospital!"


That being said, I think you're a smart guy and you could go to just as much trouble to understand the perspective of the women in the conversation. I know Miranda well enough to know she would have backed down immediately if Joel's first response had been, "I see what you mean, stupid attempt at a joke. I was rushed and I apologize." 


Instead he went out of his way NOT to acknowledge that he could have been wrong and actively tried to make the women speaking to him uncomfortable.

5 months ago on Booth Babes Are Still A Thing, Apparently

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@jayblackcomedy  I'm amazed you typed that much on your phone. And I thought my emailing-and-walking habit was an overuse of thumb typing! I salute your commitment. That being said, yes, your life experience is different than ours, and I ask that you hear us about our personal life experiences even if you don't identify with them. 

5 months ago on Booth Babes Are Still A Thing, Apparently

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I get the feeling there are a lot of men in the tech world with high Klout scores and big Twitter followings who are going to be really surprised the first time their stats (and shoe size?) don't get them in the door at a major conference where the organizers are actually interested in selling tickets to an audience that includes women. Something about the level of commitment they show to JUST. NOT. LISTENING. tells me that these men really just think they're never going to need anything that requires them to be capable of hearing and applying feedback that comes from a woman. (To be clear, there's a specific demographic of willfully clueless tech men I'm addressing here. There are also lots of men in tech on the conference circuit who go out of their way to make women feel safe and be heard in rooms where they're outnumbered 10:1 or worse.)

5 months ago on Booth Babes Are Still A Thing, Apparently

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I never batted a lash at this, but that may be because one of the sites where I learned the most about providing good customer experiences is titled "Customers Suck." (Don't panic -- yes, it's originally about stories of horrible customer behavior, but the power users lionized in the community are proud providers of excellent customer service, who also just happen to not be easily buffaloed when the customer is NOT right.)

5 months, 1 week ago on Sucks is a Bad Word

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@ginidietrich @jelenawoehr  What can I say? Not all of us can be special enough to run into Ki'tay in the kitchen ;)

5 months, 1 week ago on Harness the Power of Diversity in the Workplace

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This is SO important! I've read it over several times and I keep getting new things out of it with each read. I feel like so many of the mistakes you warn against are actually easiest to make if a person in power believes they are free of any kind of bias or *-ism, especially in the parts of the post where you talk about savior mentalities and unequal power dynamics (which may appear subtle to the empowered group, but quite the opposite to those disenfranchised by such a dynamic). 


Really excited about this post -- I'm saving it in my "to reference" folder and will be looking back at it often in my own hiring and management processes. (Of course, I have the additional good fortune of being able to ask you questions in person... but I'll try not to ask any that could be answered with "Um, did you read my post?") 

5 months, 2 weeks ago on Harness the Power of Diversity in the Workplace

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Ultimately the responsibility falls on all of us. If public companies (that anyone can own a piece of) are LESS socially responsible, then what does that say about the public? Shareholders need to speak out. Not all of us can own enough to play activist shareholder at meetings, but we can all lobby the firms where we keep our more modest investments to push for corporate policies that ensure there will be a future economy and environment FOR our children and grandchildren to invest in.


In my current job, I get to see the exciting trend toward not just corporate social responsibility (which is a bit buzzwordy and tends to lead to a business version of "greenwashing") but a genuine values-based commitment in the whole organization, like the one at Ben and Jerry's. It's pretty thrilling to see this from companies that you don't (yet) immediately think of on a list of social-good corporations. The B Corps movement is probably part of this becoming more mainstream... hopefully it will soon become something that every company needs to do TO be seen as maximizing shareholder value. Even profit-hungry investors have children, and it's all of our responsibility to do our bit to stabilize their future by doing the right thing now.

6 months, 1 week ago on Ice Cream, Business Ethics, and Fair-Trade Sprinkles

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I still have three copies of your first book! ;) Two signed and one to give away (which I keep replacing as I give it away) so I think I will be needing a few of this one, too. So happy for you -- excited to see you on the NYT best-sellers list!

6 months, 3 weeks ago on Spin Sucks (the Book) is Here!

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Buzzwordy it may be, but social media was a buzzword before it was a daily part of everyone's life from grandma to your 10-year-old nephew.

7 months, 4 weeks ago on Transmedia: Is User-Generated Content the Future?

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@Randy Milanovic @ginidietrich @bradmarley Well done! I always read those "what people regret on their deathbeds" stories and they're always all about "nobody regrets not spending more time at work," and I'm over here like "DAMN STRAIGHT I WOULD REGRET THAT IF I HADN'T ACCOMPLISHED ENOUGH!"

9 months, 1 week ago on Time Management: A Challenge to Make You More Productive

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@ginidietrich @bradmarley This is true. (And why is Disqus now tagging me in my own replies to people replying to me??? It didn't do that before! Um... anyway.) However, I think for people who have work that aligns with their core values, their recreation will be similar in that sense. For instance, I love to write too, but what I do when I'm tired of writing--ride my horses--isn't all that different in terms of what it represents to me. Writing is all about constantly tweaking and building until it's perfect, and so is the type of horsemanship I practice. I could go on and on about the similarities in mindset, but I need to go ride a horse.

9 months, 1 week ago on Time Management: A Challenge to Make You More Productive

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@bradmarley I kind of find it difficult to get on board with the idea that working isn't living. Maybe I'm an unrealistic idealist, but I feel like it's possible to find work that aligns with your life and values enough that you'd keep working even if you were wealthy enough to retire. That's my goal, anyway.

9 months, 1 week ago on Time Management: A Challenge to Make You More Productive

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Very timely post for me, too, Gini, as I have a week of both major work obligations and major life obligations ahead! Thanks for the thoughts. Sheryl Sandberg seems to espouse the same when she talks about leaving at 5, though her version does allow for working evenings and weekends sometimes. I think we can prioritize ruthlessly when we know our time really IS limited, but when we fudge a little, we end up not eliminating items that should be dropped as lower priority. 


Reminds me of the old snooze button dilemma... if alarm clocks never were built with them, most people would be better at waking up. 

9 months, 1 week ago on Time Management: A Challenge to Make You More Productive

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@Joshua Wilner/A Writer Writes You asked an entire gender to defend ourselves for a position I can't recall you providing any proof any woman ever actually took, so I'm not sure what your problem is with my pointing out that your initial comment was a red herring. But, you have every right not to like my response, and I'll decline to respond to your personal remarks except to say that I'm personally very happy with my career. Have a nice day. 

1 year, 2 months ago on The Double Standard in Women’s Equality is Alive and Well

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@RobBiesenbach @lauraclick Well, for my part, I've mostly known amazing women in business, including Gini. Not to deny anyone else's personal experience, but I think women make excellent leaders and mentors. There are some women I don't relate well to in a work environment, but I'm never going to love everybody, that's why they call it "work" not "social time with the people you personally choose based on how much you like them." I dunno, maybe I'm just not in the right industry to run into this sabotaging behavior, but I've had a lot of great female mentors, personally.

1 year, 2 months ago on The Double Standard in Women’s Equality is Alive and Well

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@Joshua Wilner/A Writer Writes I simply said I haven't heard any such thing, including within explicitly feminist and progressive groups. You shared your (alleged) experience. Am I somehow less welcome to share mine because it's a positive rather than negative reflection on women's attitudes toward leadership? The statistics I mentioned were published by Gini on this blog originally (with sources, of course) so you should easily be able to find them.

1 year, 2 months ago on The Double Standard in Women’s Equality is Alive and Well

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@jonmikelbailey All women are caddy? No, I prefer to do the golfing ;)

1 year, 2 months ago on The Double Standard in Women’s Equality is Alive and Well

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Great post! I loved the entire article AND the photo, personally. It can be a heck of a lot of fun to play dress-up, especially when there's a good photographer on hand. I've been blessed with some photog friends who've invited me to play model from time to time, and it's a blast! There's nothing about being a smart, powerful woman leader that means you shouldn't be able to have fun and feel great. I'm excited, personally, to see that we may finally have turned the corner enough that women in leadership roles don't feel like they have to masculinize themselves to fit in. (Not dissing women leaders who PREFER more masculine clothing and mannerisms, but women shouldn't NEED masculine habits to garner respect, any more than men in traditionally female jobs are expected to don heels and makeup to fit in.)

1 year, 2 months ago on The Double Standard in Women’s Equality is Alive and Well

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@Joshua Wilner/A Writer Writes I have never heard a woman say that women should be arbitrarily slotted into 50% of CEO jobs. I HAVE heard women say, accurately, that women have statistically made more effective leaders in nearly every meaningful, fact-based metric, from hedge fund managers' performance to CEOs' effect on stock price to employee satisfaction, and that, therefore, it would behoove companies to actively recruit and develop female leaders for top jobs. I'm not sure what women you're talking to, but I've certainly never met them, and I'm pretty active in a lot of progressive groups.

1 year, 2 months ago on The Double Standard in Women’s Equality is Alive and Well

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@joeldon It's always a good idea to identify the post as a reprint. The biggest rule that works for what I do (manage a community of a few hundred thousand Web writers) is don't try to trick Google... eventually they will figure it out and penalize you. So not identifying a reprint = trying to be smarter than the machine = will bite you.

And hey, I'm a Yahoo, I'm not going to tell you not to criticize Google's intelligence ;)

1 year, 2 months ago on Six Tips for Better Public Speaking

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@joeldon @ginidietrich I've looked into this a bit and I'm no SEO professional, but I think what Gini is saying is right -- if your site generally has authority and original content, the Panda update isn't going to penalize it just for having a couple duplicate articles. The duplicate content penalties in Panda are intended to penalize sploggy sites that just republish content and don't produce a substantial amount of original content. Google isn't dumb -- it knows there are legit reasons for content to appear in multiple places.

1 year, 2 months ago on Six Tips for Better Public Speaking

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Great tool! Thanks for sharing. I'm bookmarking it for future reference!

1 year, 3 months ago on Free Google Penalty Checker Tool: Check Your Site in Two Minutes!

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I missed this somehow (which just goes to show how little this guy matters in the grand scheme of things, a fairly regular reader managed to totally not even see this despite reading that post and enjoying it)... but stay strong! I have noticed that sometimes people honestly don't know the difference between "plagiarism" and "having a similar thought." This goes both ways -- people plagiarize outright without realizing they're doing something different from just having the same opinion as the original author. 

I saw it in my CSU classes. People would actually plagiarize discussion board posts! I thought it was just pure "I'm invincible" outright laziness, but I realized some of these people didn't understand that they couldn't just follow the creative process of "decide how I feel, Google to find someone who put my opinion in words already, use their words." It seems unfathomable, right? But it happens!

And on the other side of it, there are people so aggressively protective of their words that they think a vaguely similar thought is necessarily stolen from them, and they simply form a mental block to any suggestion that they're wrong--or that THEY weren't the first to have that idea, either! In their minds, they put the thought so well that anyone else who has it must have read their blog (book/article/site...) and must have stolen from them.

1 year, 5 months ago on Four Tips for Dealing with a Plagiarism Accusation

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Thank you for writing this! It gave me a good Friday morning chuckle. I've been raving against unpaid internships for quite a while now, because the bottom line is that an internship is either paid and legal, or unpaid and illegal. Nobody, but NOBODY, is actually using unpaid interns as the federal guidelines require, e.g., in a way primarily of benefit to the intern, not to the company. If you aren't allowed to receive direct benefits from the intern's work, why have an intern?

I was just discussing this recently -- the McJobs of the world in food service and retail are often full up with people with decades of work experience who are changing careers and filling a gap after a layoff, while entry level "career jobs" have transformed into unpaid internships. So how exactly ARE young people who don't have access to funding from wealthy parents supposed to both pay their bills and get a foot in the door in their career fields? Most recent grads I know who haven't found career jobs yet would gladly work in their field for $10/hr, sometimes less. Are these companies sure it's REALLY not worth $1600/month to have a full-time intern? In the PR field, that's like... a handful of billable hours for one client. If having an intern isn't worth what you earn from a few hours of work, you don't need an intern. Fetch your own damn coffee.

1 year, 5 months ago on Five Things You Can’t Expect from an Unpaid Intern

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Did anyone mention that the meme is misused?

/pedantic

1 year, 5 months ago on Writing Pixelated: Visual Content for Generation Y

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 @stevenmcoyle Me too! Hey, you're ambitious, smart, opinionated, I like your website, and you're adorable, much like Gini. I think you can do it. Claps.

1 year, 8 months ago on Yahoo! Letter: Was Their Communications Team Consulted?

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 @stevenmcoyle I work for the company in question, and I agree that the original letter was fine -- perhaps it could have been tweaked more, but we can't all be Gini, can we? I wasn't offended -- a little amused, yes, but if we can't laugh at corporate emails conveying what will be for some people bad news, what can we laugh at?

1 year, 8 months ago on Yahoo! Letter: Was Their Communications Team Consulted?

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 @HeatherTweedy  @stevenmcoyle  @RebeccaTodd I sympathize with her and I don't want to turn that around and condemn her individually now just to respond to the age conversation, but I was laid off (empathetically, kindly, with a focus on what I'd done for the company) at 21 and still had admin privileges for the company's website for the rest of the organization's relatively short life before it failed entirely. Never touched them. Most of my friends who are twenty-somethings would do exactly what I did: Laugh at the fact that they had forgotten to turn it off, briefly fantasize about revenge, then move on with the job hunt.

1 year, 8 months ago on Three Things You Can Learn about Social Media from HMV

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OK, I'm gonna say it: I feel bad for her and, although I don't agree with her actions, I think the employer is partly at fault. It does sound like they didn't understand the importance of social media--and the fact that they had one junior employee in charge of it solo proves that. The Marketing Director didn't know how to access the company Twitter account?! 

 

Obviously there are big things wrong with HMV. The company is failing and bankrupt. Watching a company you love and believe in fail is agonizing, especially when the cause is mismanagement so outrageous it's clear even to the most junior staff that the company could have been saved. (I'm extrapolating here and projecting a bit, but there IS that little thing about the Marketing Director not having the Twitter login... if that's exemplary of management at the company, draw your own conclusions.)

 

Someone like Gini doing a layoff would be able to make clear to even a very upset employee that their work was genuinely valued and that the decision is an absolute last resort. I know, because I was laid off at 21 by someone who has Gini's empathy. And someone so easily disgruntled that even that kind of kind, empathetic, as-fair-as-possible layoff conversation would have driven them to hijack the company Twitter... well, Gini probably wouldn't have hired them in the first place.

 

It sounds like a large group of employees were let go in an inconsiderate and sudden way that didn't offer any acknowledgement of their individual efforts. They were made to feel like numbers -- or like failed X Factor auditions, according to the rogue tweeter. She was still wrong (mostly because it sabotaged her own future) to go rogue, but I feel really badly for her and her colleagues.

1 year, 8 months ago on Three Things You Can Learn about Social Media from HMV

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Totally with you on the "scratch my back and I'll pretend I care about scratching yours" thing with LinkedIn, and now apparently G+ (I still can't really get into G+ at all, so I will take your word for it, but it sounds about right.) And I even share the pet peeve about paranormal romance novelists who want "feedback" (read: adulation).

 

In this spirit of ACTUAL feedback, I am, however, totally skeezed out by all of the social-networks-as-women-as-sexual-objects metaphors in this post, not least because, on both Facebook and Twitter, more than 50% of users are women. And yet, I see so few posts describing Twitter or Facebook as a Calvin Klein model flexing his abs for attention, or even a cute hipster boy loudly mentioning his ska-dubstep fusion band's next show. Maybe because men-as-sexual-objects metaphors are ridiculous and get deleted.

 

Reminds me of another of Mark Twain's suggestions: "Substitute "damn" every time you're inclined to write "very"; your editor will delete it and the writing will be just as it should be." Substitute the metaphorical depiction of a man as a hapless sexual object every time you're tempted to put in a metaphorical objectified woman waiting eagerly for male attention, you'll notice it looks ridiculous, you'll delete it, and the writing will be just as it should be.

 

But hey, that's just, like, my opinion, man. Also, I've got the flu and I was cranky and nauseous already, without the idea of LinkedIn sprouting breasts to help it along.

1 year, 9 months ago on Google+ Communities: Where is the Value?

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 @ginidietrich  @burgessct Maybe something told us you were going to make a fun post.

1 year, 9 months ago on Survey Says: PR Pros Use too Many Buzzwords

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 @burgessct If only that were a business model I could apply... I'd  totally translate normal, sensical communications into incomprehensible jargon and back for a living. 

1 year, 9 months ago on Survey Says: PR Pros Use too Many Buzzwords

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 @ginidietrich I could do this in my sleep. And should be. Because it's now 6:07 in the morning. Is this your fault? Are you contagious with your early rising? WHY AM I UP?

1 year, 9 months ago on Survey Says: PR Pros Use too Many Buzzwords

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 @jasonkonopinski Woo! Now what am I supposed to do for the REST of the day?

1 year, 9 months ago on Survey Says: PR Pros Use too Many Buzzwords

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Oh, Gini, I'm really thrilled we could connect on this topic. I hope your blog post creates some synergy in the working world around moving in unison to dynamically alter corporate language, so as to create transformational excellence in customer-focused and business-to-business communication. So long as we all keep sharply focused and on the bleeding edge, I think we'll be able to innovate for customers and deliver radically comprehensible communication experiences!

1 year, 9 months ago on Survey Says: PR Pros Use too Many Buzzwords

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 @ginidietrich Maybe douchepontoon.

1 year, 9 months ago on Spin Sucks: The Book

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 @ginidietrich Seriously, though. The "companies who think they need a community manager when they actually need marketing/PR/customer service" trend is out of control. "Community manager wanted, should have 3-5 years' experience in email support." THAT IS NOT COMMUNITY MANAGEMENT. "Community manager wanted, should be experienced in corporate communications and outbound PR." ALSO NOT COMMUNITY MANAGEMENT. Rabble. Rabble!

1 year, 9 months ago on Spin Sucks: The Book

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 @ginidietrich Damn. Guess I have to write that one?

1 year, 9 months ago on Spin Sucks: The Book

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Can you puh-leeese put something in about how community management is not:

 

* PR (or a substitute for PR)

* Customer service (or a sugar-free substitute for customer service)

* Marketing (or a way to force marketing messages down your customers' throats after tricking them into joining your "community?")

 

 

1 year, 9 months ago on Spin Sucks: The Book

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 @ginidietrich  @KevinVandever I'm going to hold you to this.

1 year, 9 months ago on Spin Sucks: The Book

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I don't think this was a case of bad intentions or intentional exploitation--never attribute to malice what can adequately be explained by stupidity--but it's a good reminder that, when in doubt, silence is your best option when managing brand pages during a national/international tragedy. The very most that should be said is "thinking of those grieving today" or something like that -- no elaborate words of comfort, ever. People don't look to their shoes or their cereal for comfort. They look to their friends, family, and community.

1 year, 10 months ago on Epic social media blunder by Dansko Footwear

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I've actually had MORE engagement on the page I manage, which is probably why I'm not pitchforking yet. Coincidentally, I'd started posting fewer links and more photos around the same time. Maybe I'd have gotten much more grown pre-changes, but I hit a share record last week.

1 year, 10 months ago on Spam Sucks: The Fallout from Recent Facebook Changes

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 @jasonkonopinski You know what that reminds me of? ...humanity in general. We just don't get forced to think about it that often. I'm sure we all walk by people every day who are on their way home to view something 4chan-esque. Maybe even on an old contraband VHS. And most of them probably also did some really nice things on the same day.

1 year, 10 months ago on Career Subreddits to Inspire, Motivate, and Empower You

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