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I think the key point here is that social interaction can never be reduced to one platform, but you still need interoperability between those platforms. As Shirky says, no single network can dominate all social interaction. People will always want to express themselves through different online personas or avatars (dana boyd has also spoken about this, with regards to teens especially). However, the next stage of the social web's development is about allowing people to manage those different networks and personas and even allow them to overlap in constructive ways.

3 weeks, 3 days ago on TED Star Clay Shirky on the Fragmentation of the Social Web

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@obrimark "Wearables as medical sensors could be a different story." Indeed. If Apple delivers on the medical/"quantified self" aspect of wearables, they could redefine a category, yet again. I like what Google has revealed so far in the wearables space, however. What they've done with Google Now indicates that they're learning how to make relevant, timely information available in the right context. 


Both companies will likely make a big impact on social media with their wearables. Especially when it comes to location-aware social discovery of businesses, events, etc. It will be interesting to see how Facebook, Twitter and Foursquare make use of Apple and Google's wearables for checkins and other location-based features.

3 weeks, 3 days ago on Is Apple Anti-Social?

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@Al Moghadam @Matt Foulger @Jinx13  Great point about the importance about usage data! By recording user actions in their hardware or software, companies can get objective information about how people actually use their products. 


In contrast, the things people say on social media can be highly subjective, and are influenced by what they think other people will think of what they say. But the things that people say on social media can actually be self-fulfilling. If you say negative things about a product on social media because you hear other people ganging up on it, you're likely to start believing what you say. I think Microsoft was a victim of this phenomenon when the company became uncool in the late 90s, early 2000s. 


It's extremely important for companies to understand their customers' subjective opinions about their brand, not just their objective usage statistics. Do you agree?

3 weeks, 3 days ago on Is Apple Anti-Social?

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@Avik  One might also argue that the best way to keep an Apple fresh is to keep it sealed up ;)


Only time will tell!

3 weeks, 3 days ago on Is Apple Anti-Social?

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@Scott at Kawntent  Thanks, Scott. Restraint is pretty important, especially in a sales role. Less is more, as long as your engagement is focused and relevant.

3 weeks, 6 days ago on Social Selling Action Plan, Part 4: Seek A Warm Relationship

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@Jinx13 I'm not going to wade into the fanboy wars but you have a point. Apple has millions of brand advocates. The company has built one-to-one relationships with its customers through its quality products, and now those legions of fans do its work on social media for it, for free. Other companies can learn from Apple's example, but it's a dangerous model to follow because the company's brand loyalty is practically unattainable. Every company should strive to make products that people love, but they can't realistically rely on having brand advocates go to war for them without a social media strategy. Enterprises not named Apple need a plan for identifying and supporting brand advocates and for bringing customers into social communities to deepen their loyalty. 

3 weeks, 6 days ago on Is Apple Anti-Social?

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@Scott at Kawntent  You're right. Apple has probably driven more social media use than any other company aside from the social networks themselves. You can trace the mobile-social-local phenomenon pretty directly to the explosive popularity of the iPhone.

3 weeks, 6 days ago on Is Apple Anti-Social?

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