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@MikeBelsito @mattmcgee32 Yes, those figures were way off because I misread them in OpenTable's 10K. The story is fixed.  I appreciate both of you letting me know about it. 

9 months, 1 week ago on OpenTable is hoping for a second serving

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@sardire If your comment is a subtle allusion the postseason so far in 2013, I'm inclined to agree with you. :)

9 months, 1 week ago on Google: World domination starts today

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@SeanWeinstock Your point about data is interesting. Sometimes it feels like Facebook has backed itself into a corner by having to check in with users for every incremental change in its policies on collecting private data. While Google is a vacuum that sucks up our digital contrails and remembers where we've been better than we do. It's not clear to users how both companies are parsing that data. But as far as the user-interface side of that data collection process goes, Google definitely has the advantage.

9 months, 1 week ago on Google: World domination starts today

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@TechDude44 Perhaps, but the image is from a satire in the National Film Registry, and one that takes the wind out of autocracy. I thought it conveyed the ambivalence many feel about Google controlling personal data. Not sure why it bugged you, but that wasn't my intent.

9 months, 1 week ago on Google: World domination starts today

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@markrogo Good point. It's not nitpicking. In a market where desktop sales and usage are both declining, this isn't surprising. But it's also good reminder that a lot of the mobile growth FB is seeing is coming at the expense of its older, and core business.

1 year ago on How Facebook bucked the trend of disappointing earnings

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@bgoldberg 

1950s epithet = potty mouth, connotations of June Cleaver threatening to wash someone's mouth out with soap. This is the Internet, people use adult language sometimes.

Thanks for explaining the relativist label. No, I am not a relativist.

SV is *occasionally* in the crosshairs. Most of what I see is people writing about new technologies, the companies making them and whether they're doing it well or not. It's not even close.

1 year ago on What the hell is a “real journalist” anyway?

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@bgoldberg

Bryan,

I wrote that for the reasons I spelled out in the piece. I respect your accomplishments. I respect that some people value your perspective. I respect that your anger at one or two writers may well be justified. But you painted with a broad brush all serious journalists – in your words, “a few thousand people in America who can make a living through his reporting – which includes Madrigal, the writers of this site, a lot of talented colleagues, and me. I have no problem with you per se, or even your 1950s-era epithets. When someone says bullshit about me and what I do, I call bullshit. Pardon my pottymouth.

We can disagree on terminology, but your 830 words is not a short blog post. And it was a tirade. You made generalizations about an entire profession. You imputed insulting things about a writer that are indefensible because they're not true. And while in previous posts you've shown a shrewd understanding of the business side of content, you fundamentally misunderstand what journalism is here.

Sorry I haven't written for 17 days here. I'll write more if it matters to you. But on the other hand, if you don't like what I write you don't have to read it.

Kevin

1 year ago on What the hell is a “real journalist” anyway?

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@statspotting Yes, but that map he was talking about was drawn in 2010. A lot of that territory has been colonized since then. 

1 year, 2 months ago on Is pretty good really good enough for Facebook?

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@hopefuleefair Facebook raised plenty of money when it went public, so buying the stock may not help so much. But the advertisers that give Facebook most of its revenue are trying to reach consumers under 25, which is why they matter so much to the company.

1 year, 2 months ago on Is pretty good really good enough for Facebook?

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@jonathanjaeger I don't necessarily disagree. When I was writing this, I wanted to avoid veering into speculating on actual deals and merely show theoretical examples of bold steps that would be needed. 

That said, let me make a purely speculative counterargument: What if Specific/Interactive/Myspace approached say Soundcloud and said they were junking the Myspace name and wanted to help them monetize their content with a successful ad platform that could bring brands like Chevy and Ford to sponsor bands and content? That is, what if the pitch wasn't Myspace so much as it was a way to help the people in that $50 million round make a bigger profit on their investment? If Soundcloud or Bandcamp didn't bite, some second-tier startups probably would. 

1 year, 4 months ago on Consider Myspace: What a comeback could look like

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@jonathanjaeger What about Specific? Interactive Holdings - the entity owning Myspace and Specific - has annual revenue around $325 million. If you consider that Google and Yahoo are trading around five times their annual revenue, that's a $1.6 billion company. So yes, buying them would be expensive but a deal involving the stock of a growing parent company wouldn't be unrealistic. 

1 year, 4 months ago on Consider Myspace: What a comeback could look like

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@mcarney It's a good question for Specific, but they didn't get back to my request to talk with them. I'd say it was justified, if only because at $35 million they were paying a little more than a dollar per active user. Even with the very low click-through rates Myspace has seen historically it wouldn't take too long to make that worthwhile. In addition, they bought tons of data on how people used social networks at MySpace. Granted, that's not as good as a peek inside Facebook's data, but for a company that understands only the ad-network business it was probably a great introduction to the social networking game.

1 year, 4 months ago on Consider Myspace: What a comeback could look like

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@steven_cox Fixed. Thank you for catching it.

1 year, 4 months ago on Yelp’s good stock day may be a bad sign

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@tedsp90 Um, at least since John Donahoe has been turning around the company, focusing on Buy It Now sales and de-emphasizing auctions. And even before then, since Donahoe was reacting to a slowdown in auctions.

1 year, 5 months ago on The defenestration of Andrew Mason

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@antnisP As it happened, I was talking with the owner of the local bookstore about this and he started on a long discourse about how he avoids any 3PL distributor, tries to use old-school distributors even though he knows their days are numbered. So I guess I stumbled on a way around it for now. But keep in mind. I didn't start by avoiding Amazon. I started by seeing my favorite bookstore close shop and saying, hmm, maybe I should buy from bookstores more often. It wasn't a terribly well-thought out act on my part.

1 year, 6 months ago on I admire Amazon. I just don’t shop there anymore.

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@catfitz You don't have to get it. No one's asking you to get it. No one asked you to spend, I'm guessing, 20 minutes writing 400 words writing about something that clearly has no meaning for you. I will never understand why someone starts to read something they think is dumb, and keeps reading it, and wastes even more time saying they wasted their time reading it. How is that not senseless? Why not just move on?

1 year, 6 months ago on I admire Amazon. I just don’t shop there anymore.

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I just wanted to give some belated thanks to everyone who commented on this post - even the guy who called me a narcissistic douche, a first for me (dude, turn your arrogance back on your own comment, that sized shoe fits a lot of feet). 

Everything I've written for this site in the past few months has been backed up, to the best of my ability, by facts. But every once in a while Pandodaily prints personal observations, to great effect. Look at Nathaniel Mott's piece on technology failing his family, or Sarah Lacy's response to Yammer's downtime. They are only two recent examples of well-written pieces based on a single person's observation. One made me sad, the other made me angry. One small advantage that blogs have over older business-news publications is there's room for that kind of thinking, provided it's done right.

That raises the question over whether I did it right. I thought about writing this post a month ago, then let it go - for all the reasons outlined in the criticisms below. Believe me, whatever any dissenter said I thought about it first. But I kept coming back to it. And so I took a chance - people would either like it or hate it, but I was curious about which would happen. As it happened - judging from these comments and responses on Twitter - it was a mix of both. That made me think the idea has something to it.

I really don't want to tell people what to do, and I'm pro-Amazon. I sort of bent over backwards in the piece to make those points. I also made it clear I wrote it because I wanted to see if anyone else felt as I did, and some - but not all - do. I suspected it might be the beginning of a longer conversation. And so...

1 year, 6 months ago on I admire Amazon. I just don’t shop there anymore.

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@AhmadKadhim Thanks for pointing that out. The story has been changed to reflect that this was a continuing rather than a special dividend.

1 year, 7 months ago on Hold the conspiracy theories: The real reason why Apple is slumping

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@marcmichelvc I suspect Google is trying to goad the incumbents out of their slumber (clearly not working yet, they're still hoping it will just fade away). So getting the industry to shoulder the cost is part of it. And as loathe as many in the Valley are to bring in government support, there could be federal contributions or tax breaks to help speed things along. Again, the NBP was born amid the stimulus talks during the recession, and Google conceived of this plan as part of that plan - to offer a prototype of what industry could do should there be local or federal governments helping.

1 year, 7 months ago on Google Fiber, you had our curiosity. Now you have our attention

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@MatthewMountford Thanks for sharing that link. It's pretty interesting.

1 year, 7 months ago on Google Fiber, you had our curiosity. Now you have our attention

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@statspotting I think they're both. MySpace in 2005 was News Corp.'s effort to understand social media before it went mainstream as it did with Facebook. The Daily was the same in tablets. But both were dishonest experiments, because Murdoch was looking for a desired result. In that sense, they were bad business decisions. The two aren't mutually exclusive. 

1 year, 7 months ago on From MySpace to the Daily: The real tragedy in News Corp.’s digital experiments

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@BenKoo You could make that case, but I don't think you'd be right. ESPN is pretty far ahead in most respects.

1 year, 7 months ago on From MySpace to the Daily: The real tragedy in News Corp.’s digital experiments

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@Nathanielmott, my heart goes out to you and your family. You've captured in words the pain that is unimaginable until you actually have to go through it. Technology fails, yes, but if we're lucky we have our loved ones to carry us through these times.

1 year, 8 months ago on How technology is failing my family

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 @markrogo  @Thomas Krafft It shouldn't be too much to ask. If Amazon or Apple did end up buying Netflix, streaming and buying alike could be options. The dream of accessing any movie or show, however, is likely to be more of a reality for pirates for some time.

1 year, 9 months ago on Netflix must ponder its endgame strategy

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 @GROUPTHINKER Groupthink in a mind with multiple personalities is not necessarily a good thing. 

 

You said: "$6.9bn of cash after the Alibaba taxes."

 

Yahoo says: "Net cash proceeds after taxes and fees from the first stage of the repurchase agreement total approximately $4.3 billion." http://investor.yahoo.net/releasedetail.cfm?ReleaseID=707698

 

You said: "$3.9 bn after the buyback (not $650mm)."

 

Yahoo says: "Yahoo! will return approximately $3.65 billion in after-tax proceeds to shareholders, or 85 percent of the net cash proceeds from the initial sale of its shares in Alibaba. This amount includes $646 million the company has already returned to shareholders through share repurchases." (same link)

 

Your comparison of Yahoo to AOL is not unlike a comparison of yourself to Honey Boo Boo. Be gone, troll.

 

1 year, 9 months ago on Marissa Mayer and the art of the earnings call

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 @RashadtheGod That is a pivot that could really turn things around. But how many years before 3D printers become a household item?

1 year, 9 months ago on The Unpivotable Hewlett-Packard

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 @thomashpeterson The board does bear a lot of the blame. It had its own scandals and revolving-door changes and will certainly be regarded as one of the worst of the decade. I focused on CEO leadership since that is the role that focuses the most on strategies that can make or break a company.

1 year, 9 months ago on The Unpivotable Hewlett-Packard

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 @kjemperud Ugly typo. Fixed. Thanks for catching it.

1 year, 10 months ago on What Happens If Smartphones Become Commodities?

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 @KenG  @kpkelleher "The 8-year-old will grow up, and find that Facebook is not a universal communications tool."

 

On that broader point, I think we agree. 

1 year, 10 months ago on Facebook’s Growing Silent-Majority Problem

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 @KenG You make a good point about the lack of overlap between desired ad demographics and Facebook's core audience. I can't speak for Zuckerberg, but this quote from Clay Shirky sums up why I think he's on to something. 

 

"...my eight-year-old daughter, yesterday said, 'Oh, cell phones are eventually going to be one [biological] cell big and you can just talk into your hand,'" Shirky said. "She totally internalized the idea that the container is going to keep shrinking. When an eight-year-old picks it up, it's not like she's been reading the trade press. This is in the culture." ( http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2012/09/iphone-5-yawn-what-will-the-phone-of-2022-look-like/262300/ )

 

I'm too old to get this myself, but I think that among people who grew up in the era of the web, there is an intuitive understanding of the culture that is shaping how we will all use the web.

1 year, 10 months ago on Facebook’s Growing Silent-Majority Problem

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