Livefyre Profile

Activity Stream

@samemac I dunno - imagine the hashtag fun you could have with that!

9 hours, 8 minutes ago on Five Steps to Insanely Good Customer Service

Reply

@JRHalloran #Amirite??

9 hours, 50 minutes ago on Five Steps to Insanely Good Customer Service

Reply

@Digital_DRK Nice to see they didn't use a standard canned response. Oh, wait...

9 hours, 50 minutes ago on Five Steps to Insanely Good Customer Service

Reply

@Howie Goldfarb "Social business"? Pfft - that's like saying write a book about influence and make it all about Klout. @belllindsay

10 hours, 15 minutes ago on Five Steps to Insanely Good Customer Service

Reply

@Howie Goldfarb @belllindsay Agree and disagree. Yes, Comcast is typical of the social media hype around "socializing your business". So what if Comcast were lauded for their social media approach with customers? The service still sucked, and they continued to be on "America's Worst Companies" five years after the social hype.

I'd disagree about the value of social and its primary use for basic info. I've run multiple social teams on service, from mobile providers to severe red-tape organizations, and the ability to shift the easy answers away from call centres to social led to reductions in dropped call rates, faster turnaround of actual escalated calls, better understanding of the customer experience, and an increase in brand perception and customer satisfaction.

Is it limited as to what can actually be achieved on social? Yes - but these limited interactions leave more time for the more in-depth customer needs, and that's always going to be a win.

11 hours, 2 minutes ago on Five Steps to Insanely Good Customer Service

Reply

One does not simply "crack open" a bottle of fine single malt. #heathen

1 day, 3 hours ago on Five Steps to Insanely Good Customer Service

Reply

@belllindsay No, ma'am, I don't - if that had been the set-up when I met my wife, I would never have moved here, she'd be moving to the UK!!

1 day, 7 hours ago on Five Steps to Insanely Good Customer Service

Reply

Let's be honest, though - you'll be moaning about them again next week. ;-)

I can't believe how Canada operates. Coming from the UK, and the choice that was not only available, but actively encouraged, this monopoly approach confounds me.

And don't get me started on the fact I can't buy beer at 2.00am, from the all-night corner store!!!

1 day, 7 hours ago on Five Steps to Insanely Good Customer Service

Reply

@Andrea Beltrami I'm glad you said, "Not cool enough" versus "not old enough"!

1 day, 7 hours ago on Don’t Be Alarmed – But I Want You to Kill Your RSS Feed

Reply

@mike ashworth True - but that's the beauty of Unsubscribe, mate. :)

I'm not sure people do cull everyone based on actions of few. Is there the possibility that happens? Sure - but given the way it's easy enough to manage unsubscriptions and report offenders, I'd say the onus is less on the recipient bulk removing versus the sender being respectful.

1 day, 8 hours ago on Don’t Be Alarmed – But I Want You to Kill Your RSS Feed

Reply

Generally, no. Now, if we were talking universally... ;)

2 days, 1 hour ago on Content Creators: Enough with the Boring

Reply

First there was Bob the Builder, now there's Bob the Building - love it! :)

2 days, 5 hours ago on Creative Marketing by Bob the House

Reply

Nuh uh. An idea is content. If you steall my content, I will direct you to this post and comment and.... well... do something, that's for sure!

4 days, 3 hours ago on Four Ways to Fight Content Thieves

Reply

@ginidietrich Post your results!!!

4 days, 4 hours ago on Content Creators: Enough with the Boring

Reply

@ginidietrich Too lazy, beer calling.

4 days, 4 hours ago on Four Ways to Fight Content Thieves

Reply

@samfiorella I know, heresy, right? I'll duck back under my rock now. :)

4 days, 6 hours ago on Your Blog Should Not Require A Topic Generator

Reply

If you get stuck, the "wise" people of HubSpot have created a blog topic generator. Nothing could possibly go wrong with that...

4 days, 6 hours ago on Content Creators: Enough with the Boring

Reply

Amen, Sam, amen.

It's not that difficult either. Holy crap, if you can't find stuff to blog about, it makes me wonder how you find customers to market to. After all, that's all blogging is primarily doing - marketing your services (knowledge) to customers (readers, subscribers, etc).

To @Milaspage point, expand the pool, if you need to. Invite employees, team members, etc., to blog. Encourage them to open up, and you'll make it read nice, etc - just say what you feel as part of that business.

And if you're a personal blogger that needs something to write about? Wait until you have something to say.

4 days, 7 hours ago on Your Blog Should Not Require A Topic Generator

Reply

There's also #5, which I'm surprised none of the blog services have thought of yet. Whitelist the publications your syndicated blog appears in, and the RSS host ignores any other calls. Pretty simple, given WordPress itself can ban non-approved commenters.

Especially for a paid service like Feedblitz or similar - instead of just accepting it as a danger of the web, try and out something in place that protects the content, versus a disclaimer that can be removed.

4 days, 11 hours ago on Four Ways to Fight Content Thieves

Reply

I am so disappointed with this post. I was expecting 8 tips. Why are there only 7? That's an odd number.

1 week, 1 day ago on Seven Steps to Dealing with Critics

Reply

@ginidietrich Nothing new there, then... :)  Clearly it's the mix of Scottish and Aussie accents, even in the comments! @Digital_DRK

2 weeks ago on The Spin Sucks Inquisition: Darryl Robinson-Keys

Reply

@Digital_DRK HA! Yeah, that place is a maze!

2 weeks ago on The Spin Sucks Inquisition: Darryl Robinson-Keys

Reply

It's a pretend accent - he's actually from Wales. #truestory :)

2 weeks ago on The Spin Sucks Inquisition: Darryl Robinson-Keys

Reply

@ginidietrich What about today?

2 weeks, 2 days ago on Tell Your Organization’s Story Without Sex

Reply

@Eleanor Pierce Thankfully, here in Canada, we don't know that of which you talk. :)

2 weeks, 3 days ago on Tell Your Organization’s Story Without Sex

Reply

Wait - someone successfully sells sex using Honey Boo Boo? 

2 weeks, 3 days ago on Tell Your Organization’s Story Without Sex

Reply

@belllindsay PS - check your FB inbox. :)

2 weeks, 4 days ago on Content Overload: Get “This.” to Help That

Reply

@belllindsay There's only "so much" because we tell ourselves there is. It's like the so-called "content shock" discussion from last year - it's a nice buzzy word to flip around, but ultimately that's all it is.

2 weeks, 4 days ago on Content Overload: Get “This.” to Help That

Reply

Been using This. for a little while, and love the idea of limiting content sharing.

I don't buy into the content overload argument, though - we filter and we choose, much like we've always done. Besides, more users are coming online, so ratio-wise we're about the same as we've always been.

2 weeks, 4 days ago on Content Overload: Get “This.” to Help That

Reply

Solid stuff, mate, as usual - you're hitting an excellent stride here.

I used to care about SEO, and I actually got some great organic results when I did (I still get good traffic to this day for certain keywords, five years down the line).

But it's too long-winded; too intensive; too tiring; too restricting. You lose the content creator you started out as, and want to be.

Is SEO and placement important for brands? Yes, of course - but more and more, you need deeper pockets and resources to grab the all-important page one results. 

I'm past that now. My focus is on content, quality content, that people can (hopefully) leave having consumed something that isn't 10-to-the-dozen elsewhere, and that might just make them think a little bit longer than remembering how much optimization they were reading.

Cheers, mate.

3 weeks ago on Let’s Have a Truthful Conversation About Content Marketing

Reply

@samfiorella Of course they can be ignored - it's a choice. Life is occurring in real-time, but real-time doesn't mean we need to be on 24/7. Choose to be on for the work that needs to be done, then choose to close that down when it's no longer needed.

We check stuff because we believe it's important - it rarely is as important as the level of importance we give it. Will an email reply to a client or boss really signal the end of the world if it waits until morning? No.

If it's critical to respond, by all means do. If it's not, we're simply making excuses for being tethered to tech.

3 weeks ago on Smartphones and the Numbing of the American Mind

Reply

I started reading this post then couldn't be arsed to finish it.

3 weeks, 1 day ago on Procrastinators: Stereotypes and Science

Reply

@markkolier Exactly, mate. Instead of just talking about the great work-life balance your company offers employees, prove it. 

3 weeks, 1 day ago on Smartphones and the Numbing of the American Mind

Reply

Interesting thoughts and analysis as always, mate.

For me, it comes down to the same point you made recently about hate and ignorance towards people - it comes down to choice.

Are smartphones ubiquitous? Yes? Do they need to be used? No. Can they be ignored? Yes?

When I come home from work, the phone is put away until the kids go to bed. My focus is on them.

When I go to dinner with my wife, the phone stays in my pocket. My focus is on my wife.

When I commute to work (or home from work), I check the phone at the start of the journey, and then it goes back in my pocket until I reach my destination. Instead, I watch the sunrise; read the paper; close my eyes and enjoy the moment.

We create the people we are - technology should complement that, not rule it. Otherwise, we may as well just switch off now and be zombies until we die.

3 weeks, 1 day ago on Smartphones and the Numbing of the American Mind

Reply

@danielschiller From that piece:

Second, speaking personally, I long ago decided that blog posts needed to be standalone pieces, so I'm not sure we can really blame that on new forms of social media. It was probably as early as 2005 or 2006 that I concluded two things. Not only do blog posts need to be standalone, but they can't even ramble very much. You need to make one clear point and avoid lots of distractions and "on the other hands." This is because blog readers are casual readers, and if you start making lots of little side points, that's what they're going to respond to. Your main point often simply falls by the wayside. So keep it short and focused. If you have a second point to make, just wait a bit and write it up separately not as a quick aside open to lots of interpretation, but with the attention it deserves.

For me, this is the blogger's mistake - content is content, whether it's standalone, a series, or episodic. Fall into the tunnel vision mindset that it can only be one thing, and of course your blogging is going to suffer.

3 weeks, 2 days ago on Sponsored Comments: Is the Web About to Get Uglier?

Reply

@ginidietrich If I used Disqus, and was someone who made money directly on their blog, sure (as long as I could curate what type of sponsored content appeared).

Sites like The Bleacher Report would be perfect for this - NFL content for Super Bowl stories, FIFA 15 for Xbox on stories about the English Premier League, etc.

Then think social causes - read a story about breast cancer, Komen sponsored content appears (OK, not Komen after all their controversy, but you get the picture). 

Or think educational sites (colleges, for example) and you see sponsored content from stores and businesses near the college, who offer savings for students, etc.

If  implemented properly, and with context, I can actually see this being really successful.

3 weeks, 3 days ago on Sponsored Comments: Is the Web About to Get Uglier?

Reply

@KristenDaukas You take that back about Jennifer right now!!!! ;)

3 weeks, 3 days ago on Sponsored Comments: Is the Web About to Get Uglier?

Reply

@DwayneAlicie It's not just down to avoidance, though - often it's the only way to get a message across.

Let's say a charity has tried newspapers, TV, radio, etc, to try and raise awareness of their cause, to little effect. Then they decide to sponsor content on the blog of a mom whose son suffers from the illness their charity is looking to help. That sponsorship raises the bar on awareness and support.

We get so sucked up into the "making money is bad" mindset (or, in the charity's case, putting ourselves out there more proactively) that we run the risk of turning the web into a boring, sanctioned-only-by-my-approval closed sandpit.

3 weeks, 3 days ago on Sponsored Comments: Is the Web About to Get Uglier?

Reply

@belllindsay I'm surprised Pantene Extra Strength Grey Remover hasn't signed you up yet...

3 weeks, 3 days ago on Sponsored Comments: Is the Web About to Get Uglier?

Reply

Disqus has essentially been doing sponsored comments for a while, now, with their Suggested Posts option that allows you to make money from related post links around the web (you can use your own content instead, but the option to make some money from clicks is there too).

I'm not sure if it'll be a bad thing, if implemented properly. It would just be another advertorial, and people will either click, or not click. And, as Disqus mentions, it's at the discretion of the publisher, who should have a pretty good handle on whether their audience will be receptive to it or not.

3 weeks, 3 days ago on Sponsored Comments: Is the Web About to Get Uglier?

Reply

@samfiorella @berkson0 That makes sense. I've thought for a while that micro-communities within communities is where the "gold" lies. Something I've been discovering as my content approach has morphed in the last 12-18 months. I can see a day, perhaps in the next year or so, where the gated content approach will be more widespread for bloggers, for example, and not limited to brands.

It may not even be premium content that's gated - more, "OK, here's my public stuff, but this little community over here is where we'll really dig in and get to know and support one another."

Mainstream content is disappearing - sure, it'll be there for eyeballs, but the real value is coming from micro.

1 month ago on Social Media Has Killed Consumer Trust

Reply

@Eleanor Pierce Nobody tells me anything anymore!

1 month ago on Offsite Content Marketing: Six Tactics to Reach New Audiences

Reply

@belllindsay Not just any old beer - FREE BEER! @ginidietrich

1 month ago on Content Distribution: Eight Ways to Gain New Readers

Reply

@samfiorella Oh, for sure - but then that has to be included in any data disclaimer. Purchases based on financial situations are different from purchases made based on trust and influence (even though financial is a factor of influence).

1 month ago on Social Media Has Killed Consumer Trust

Reply

@samfiorella To a degree, yes. But it begs the question again, how are ads being defined? Are advertorials posited as recommendations from trusted peers included? Disclosure comes down to the individual, unfortunately, and we both know from personal experience there are some crappy individuals out there posing as friends and trusted peers.

Not dispelling the notion that trust is eroded - I just find it hard to accept it as a key loss, when the same folks are happy enough to take free or discounted products and offers because a coupon is attached.

Let's say Friends A and B say, "Don't buy McDonalds, their products are pink slime", but Friend C buys anyway because they're running a two-for-one offer at Mickey D's that week. When morals go out the window for the sake of $5, it makes you question the validity of the information being given to the data collectors by the interviewees.

1 month ago on Social Media Has Killed Consumer Trust

Reply

@Howie Goldfarb @AmyVernon I often wonder why the likes of Huffington Post and The Good Men Project don't get hit with Google penalties. Their sites are atrocious when it comes to load, due to all the tracking scripts and ads they have running.

1 month ago on RIP The Death of the Social Media Rock Star

Reply

@Eleanor Pierce Look, it's against the law to fire moms when on mat leave, so you can stop sucking up to @ginidietrich now.

1 month ago on Offsite Content Marketing: Six Tactics to Reach New Audiences

Reply

Hey there Sam,

Great thoughts as usual, and some interesting takeaways. I have my own thoughts on how consumers are equally of guilty at ruining social media as marketers are said to be, but that's for another day.

One thing I would say is, looking at the two charts you share, while word-of-mouth is still #1 in both, it's not as big a deal as seems to be made out by these two reports.

In the first chart, as you point out, ads come in at #2 and #3 respectively, but the #2 doesn't share how the ratio of internet ads (PPC, SEM) compares to social ads (Sponsored Stories, Promoted Tweets). For all we know, the very stuff Millennials say they don't trust could be the stuff they're actually clicking on.

With regards chart two, I notice that #2 and #3 are coupons, with online coupons almost sharing the same percentage as one-to-one recos. So, "we won't trust your ads, but we sure as heck will take your stuff because it's cheaper".

Which kinda negates the #1 reason of influence... ;-)

Sure, crappy marketing and shills have ruined social's potential - but consumers are just as bad at propagating this, because they still take advantage of the very thing they rail against. And so the cycle continues...

1 month ago on Social Media Has Killed Consumer Trust

Reply