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The Supreme Court did not uphold "most portions of the law in a ruling last summer."  They upheld ONE provision - the tax(penalty) on the individual mandate.  They also struck down one provision, disallowing the federal government from witholding medicaid funds if a state choses not to expand medicaid.  No other provisions of the law were before the court.  Many other provisions will undoubtably end up in the Supreme Court in the future, but so far, obamacare is 1 for 2 on two very specific items.

1 year, 8 months ago on SC House Says NO to Exchange – Tenth Amendment Center Blog

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I continue to be surprised by Mr. Natelson's adherence to the philosophy that the U.S. Constitution was a grant from the people to the federal government rather than a compact amongst 13 sovereign states banding together to do a few specific things for their common good.  I can find nothing in the quotes above that could not also be construed to support this doctrine.

 

I would suggest that those who are serious about further pursuing this most important topic would profit by reading Abel Upshur's "A Brief Enquiry into the True Nature and Character of Our Federal Government".  http://www.constitution.org/ups/upshur.htm

 

It was written back in the 1840s by a highly respected judge, who later became secretary of the Navy and then Secretary of State under President Tyler.

 

It is one of the most thorough, well reasoned and logical explanations of the true nature of our federal government, with ample footnotes and historical facts, that I have ever read.

 

Every serious tenther should read this and recommend it to their friends.  It provides a very solid framework and foundation upon which to build a sound case for the necessity and appropriateness of nullification of unconstitutional federal laws and regulations.

 

I'd like to see the TAC do a lot more promotion of Judge Upshur's works if they really want to promote the soundness of the nullification doctrine.

2 years, 1 month ago on There's Much More than just the <i>Federalist Papers</i>

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