Livefyre Profile

Activity Stream

And another thing: currently the law gives me the right to marry a woman... if I did, would that meet your definition of marriage?  I know a gay man who married a Lesbians because they were both in the military and that way they both got a pay increase.  I knew a straight woman who married a gay man because he was in the military and wanted a "beard" and she wanted his health benefits.  I've know plenty of gays and Lesbians who've married the opposite sex so one could get a greencard.  Are these marriages marriages by your definition?  Because they are marriages under the law.  So your definition of marriage already is different from the legal definition of marriage.  I think my marriage is a lot closer to the traditional definition because I got married in order to make a life long mutual commitment to another human being, for better or for worse, etc.  And moreover, because we respect marriage too much as an institution, we did not have him marry a woman, even though that would have solved our immigration problems. 

2 years ago on Why is Gay Marriage Like a Dodge Durango?

Reply

News flash: no one is asking you to change your definition of marriage.  We are only talking about the legal definition of marriage.  I'm married to the person with whom I want to spend the rest of my life, and although I may be a bit offended that you want to say that I am not married, but I don't really care.  As long as the government says that I am married, that is good enough for me.  I can't dictate the definition of marriage or anything else to you. And other news flash, you have freedom of speech, which means the government cannot fore any definition of you.  For example, government does have a definition of a "car" and that does not include SUV's, and that is really important if you are importing a car or SUV because it impacts the import duties you pay, but they are not going to arrest you for calling an SUV a car or a turtle for that matter.  Furthermore, I am not trying to "plunder" anyone, I am actually trying to live in my own country: my husband is Australian, and because a federal law (the Defense of Marriage Act) blocks me from having the same rights as a straight person, I am being forced to abandon my home and move overseas to be with my chosen life partner.  (stopthedeportations.com is a website full of stories like mine.)  If your concern is economics, then you should be fighting to keep me here because I pay way more in taxes than I get back in services: last year I paid $250k in income taxes, I pay far more in social security and medicare taxes than I will ever get back, I pay taxes to support schools even though I have no children, I certainly won't ever receive a welfare check, and I have never taken unemployment.  I'm the one getting plundered, and forcing me to live in exile from my homeland is not only cruel to me and my family, it's stupid.  All those tax dollars will be lost.  Plus who will take care of my aged and ailing mother now that my father has passed away?  I'm from a lower middle class background and worked really hard to put myself through school and build a successful career and now I am being forced to abandon all I have worked for just to be with my chosen spouse.  My family arrived on the Mayflower, fought in the revolution, and fought for this country in every war it has ever had... I myself worked for the Treasury under both Clinton and Bush and was the main number cruncher of the Iraq Debt Restructuring, which allowed Iraq to have some hope for a future not so overburdened by debts that the country would be lost, which helped ensure that those men and women who did fight in Iraq would not have fought in vain.  I am as American as they come, and should have the right to live in my own country with the spouse of my choice.  And as to whether we have a "right" to marry the person of our choice, the Supreme Court has said people do.  In Loving vs. Virginia, the Supreme Court struck down laws barring interracial marriage saying people have a fundamental right to marry the person of their choice (or maybe better said, a couple where both partners consent to marriage has a right to marriage).  Although you cannot force someone to marry you if that person does not want, you still have a right to marry the person of your choice if he/she agrees as long as you are straight.  The question before us now is whether I have that same right to marry the person of my choice even though I am not straight. 

2 years ago on Why is Gay Marriage Like a Dodge Durango?

Reply