Livefyre Profile

Activity Stream

Great writing. Informative but fun too! 

1 year, 4 months ago on A crowdfunded house for techies in Vegas. What could possibly go wrong?

Reply

As a former healthcare consultant this model sounds like a great way to bring together disparate parties. Very interesting.

1 year, 5 months ago on Prebacked partners with Wellmark Blue Cross Blue Shield to facilitate real innovation in med-tech

Reply

Nicely done. Standing up for high quality journalism is always a good thing! 


1 year, 5 months ago on No advertisers paid the Wall Street Journal to reach Henry Blodget

Reply

This is a GREAT article. Straight into my 'wisdom' evernote folder. And yes, Ricardo Semler is the last 100 year's most underrated business executive. 

1 year, 6 months ago on Living with doubt

Reply

I seem to recall that at Apple only the CEO and CFO have P&L responsibility? Jobs on purpose removed the "bottom dollar" as a factor to ensure people make the best products, since he believed if the company did that the money would follow. Now I realize a startup is not Apple, but even so, I'm not sure anyone claims Apple is badly run from a P&L perspective? I do think that there's a debate to be had around how many people in a company should be aware of/bound by P&L concerns. APPL seems to work well with less is more, while you argue the opposite? Cheers

1 year, 8 months ago on When entrepreneurs start thinking like corporate buffoons

Reply

iPhone 5 pre-order sells out 20 times faster than 4 and 4S, further highlighting Apple’s dominance - http://tcrn.ch/OnwfRk

1 year, 11 months ago on Yesterday Marked the Beginning of the End of Apple’s Dominance, Unless…

Reply

First: business exists to generate profits (corporate finance 101: companies can go bankrupt with large and growing revenues). APPLE's iPhone is more profitable than all other cell manufacturers' phones put together. Every single company in the world would LOVE Apple's profits. This profit leadership can not end anytime soon (look how long MSFT has straggled along because of cash from an inferior OS). This fact alone disqualifies the article's main contention. Even if Apple's relative profitability drops some, it'll still be the world's most profitable company along Exxon. Secondly, Amazon and Google finally producing decent tablets isn't a sign of Apple's fall, but rather the natural order of things. And again, the vast majority of industry tablet profits flow to Apple. Finally, Apple is not trying to with ALL customers, so there'll be plenty that will gravitate to good offerings from Amazon and Google. Tim Cook won't mind as long as he's generating the industry's highest profits. Summary: improved devices from Goog and Amz is not a sign of Apple's degeneration, but rather a sign of inevitable competitor counter-punches to Apple's outstanding products. And to prove I'm not an apple fanboy: I'm writing this on a Dell XPS, use a blackberry, and I don't own an iPad. And I'll add this: anyone that thinks Steve Jobs can be replaced is just indulging in wishful thinking. This is no reflection on Tim Cook's abilities, or Job's attempts to integrate and systematize his skills into the Apple organization, but rather the obvious observation that the Michael Jordans, Muhammed Alis, Wayne Gretzkys, Diego Maradonas, Jack Welchs, Hemingways, etc, of the world come along once every few decades. The likelihood that Tim Cook is another once per generation business genius is just about 0. 

1 year, 11 months ago on Yesterday Marked the Beginning of the End of Apple’s Dominance, Unless…

Reply

Hrm... sure, this analysis could be correct, but only if Apple doesn't come out with some revolutionary new product in the next few years, the way it repeatedly has in the last decade. At this point, frankly, they'd be stupid to divert major attention away from the iPhone, iPad, and Mac. There's a lot of mileage left in those products. I suspect when the timing is right, at some point in the next few years, they'll once again come out with another game changer. If they don't, then yes, this article's analysis carries more weight. But I posit that it's much too soon to make the above argument. 

1 year, 11 months ago on Tim Cook’s Apple: A Perfectly Ordinary Company

Reply

Great response to David Sacks. I'll add the historical perspective: momentous and revolutionary change has been a constant part of our modern existence, especially since the birth of the spinning jenny and the industrial revolution. Just one example: think back to where Germany was 50 years ago - a bombed out nation with mass starvation. It is now the most financially and politically powerful country in Europe. The world will continue to change in drastic ways, and that changing world will birth enormous commercial opportunities for those brave enough to try "crazy" things. It was always thus, and will always be so. David's argument that this is somehow a "new normal" surely isn't strong enough to push aside 200 years of recent historical facts?

2 years ago on David Sacks’ Argument Is Rational, It’s a Good Thing Silicon Valley Isn’t

Reply

1. I admire Pando for posting this even though it is highly critical of the earlier piece by Pando's employee. It's great to debate!

2. I understand Ben's argument, but from someone who doesn't follow Dell's financials closely, I would have loved to have some hard numbers behind Ben's assertions: how small are these new Dell initiatives? <1%? <5%? >20% of revenues? If they are really small Ben is making some huge assumptions as to the continued viability of Dell as a gigantic company. Every company the size of Dell is bound to have initiatives in every major area of market development, but that doesn't guarantee success. Is Dell going to be like HP in the mobile space and fumble? Or will it be like IBM, able to change course completely into consulting/support services? Some hard numbers would have helped Ben make a more persuasive argument. Thanks

2 years ago on Dell Is Done? Just a Little Premature

Reply