Livefyre Profile

Activity Stream

"any company [is screwed]"

How about individuals?

6 months, 2 weeks ago on As Windows XP doomsday comes, what does this mean for your POS system?

Reply

Moderator, it was a bad call to delete the comment from Laura Carney. Sure, she kinda went off on PayPal.  But we need to hear her message, that technology can help the worse off among us and PayPal could meet an important social need if the product weren't so horrible.


I'm bagging on PayPal too, but because they're so greedy and opaque, screwing up real people's lives. They deserve it.

11 months, 3 weeks ago on If it’s not broke, break it: How David Marcus is dismantling PayPal to save it

Reply

As a loyal user of PayPal for many years, of course I root for the company to succeed. For example, I am confident they will do nothing to disrupt the responsive, intelligent and helpful care and information service that have reinforced my appreciation for the company's service and the culture that makes it possible.

But one new set of policies may lose my business, and open a space in the payments market for a competitor.  Paypal payments have always been charged directly to my credit card, and are credited to Paypal in cash soon after the charge is authenticated.  A win/win, right?  That's what I thought.  But now the company has told me they need to have my personal banking information as a guarantee.  What's wrong?  Perhaps they don't trust American Express anymore?  Have they ever once, just once, not gotten their money? After bank fraud cost me around $40K some years ago there's no way I will let that information out into cyberspace again, and PayPal has no right to demand this.

Of course there is a way out of this, they tell me.  I can always become a credit card customer of theirs.  Well, they don't have a right to demand this either. Millions of Americans carry far too much credit card debt, and immediate payments from PayPal are a useful antidote.  To have and use more credit cards is a step backwards.

If its traditional business model is not making enough for PayPal. maybe it needs to devise more strategies to monetize it.  But upsetting the model will cost them far more than it would gain.

1 year, 2 months ago on If it’s not broke, break it: How David Marcus is dismantling PayPal to save it

Reply

Don't have the time to figure out a PC way to say this, but Buffalo benefits from something else:  the nasty bits -- and Buffalo has nasty bits as bad as anything in the Rust Belt -- are huge and horrid, but they are quite insulated from the rest of the city.  They are so bad you can instantly tell if you've gone the wrong way in time to hang a quick u turn.  One dead giveaway is the percentage of boarded up and/or gutted buildings; another one is the number of police cars running 'hot' (with flashing lights) at night.


Unlike in other cities, nobody seems to talk much about making these areas (and their people, who of course do not figure in paeans like this article) part of the city's bright future.  It's got its collective hands full with the parts that might, with enough energy and love, be saved.

1 year, 2 months ago on The 9 best things about Buffalo, NY (from a newcomer)

Reply

@sandman_va Don't forget the screens all over, alla the time. 1000s of texts per day, etc.  Worse than crack.

1 year, 6 months ago on Why online education is mostly a fantasy

Reply

Okay, yiou got my click. For what that;s worth8.

1 year, 6 months ago on “A Zuckerberg always pays his debts.” Your Game of Thrones guide to tech companies

Reply

...and the Times does not remonstrate lightly!


1 year, 6 months ago on The New York Times should be ashamed, but only for pandering to idiotic Twitter outrage

Reply

“One day the large media companies of the world will use the profits from the higher-margin, mass-appeal publications to supplement the lower-margin efforts of investigative and ‘narrative’ journalists.”

Hah!  Why should they?  And if they try it, they'll be clobbered by competitors with no such scruples.

1 year, 7 months ago on Pageview journalism is killing us

Reply

Love he physical keyboard on my droid 4.  It means I can finally be productive on the road, permitting lots of shorter emails and web searches.  Texting is not all there is!  I understand this will always be a minority opinion, but encourage at least one real (non-BB) platform to offer it.

1 year, 8 months ago on The new BlackBerry: Party in the front, uncertainty in the back

Reply

This thread has a persistent misunderstanding of the print publication business model.

 

They are not charging readers for the editorial.  They are charging advertisers for access to the readers.  It's the advertising that generates the money that pays for editorial.

 

Without this advertising, which is much more costly than online ads, they couldn't pay the writers.  And not just them, but the entire infrastructure that supports them -- the obvious parts such as editors, but the not so obvious parts, such as indemnification and brand value.

 

That's why you can't just charge readers for articles and make anything near close to the money needed to support a professional editorial operation. That's why pretty much the only way writers make money in this is to blog instead, because that's so fast and cheap.

 

Otherwise it's like 'sharedphysics' says below: it becomes a well-meaning philanthropic effort, or a hobby.

2 years ago on Suddenly everyone wants New Yorker style content. Only one catch: Who is going to write it?

Reply

Another deficiency of the free model is access to sources.  Many sources don't care.  But the ones who know the most and have the right connections care a great deal, and they insist that you are talking to them on behalf of a credible organization.

 

Nothing wrong with people in all kinds of disciplines with paying day jobs who want to do this as a hobby (and people can take their hobbies very, very seriously).

 

But there's a great deal wrong with the pretense that this is journalism.  And with the contempt for a professional journalist's experiences and skills that this business model seems to depend on.

2 years ago on Suddenly everyone wants New Yorker style content. Only one catch: Who is going to write it?

Reply

Why do we all assume that the Silicon Valley model is the right one? The last ten years have demonstrated many of its limitations.

2 years ago on Startups in translation: South Korea meets Silicon Valley

Reply

Good long-form content takes money.  Not just $2/word for the writer, but for the entire supporting infrastructure including editors and fact-checking. Without a business model that supports paying professionals to do this stuff, it's just more Buzzfeed.

2 years ago on Suddenly everyone wants New Yorker style content. Only one catch: Who is going to write it?

Reply

...and FB has one of the worst mobile apps in the market.

2 years ago on The Last Thing Facebook Needs Is Another Billion Users

Reply

 @johnnydfred Yeah, that is pretty dorky.  But they do it because they're flailing about for some way to protect the brand identity that advertisers pay for. Take the advertisers out of the picture, and there's simply not enough money to produce the quality products. I think Hearst once estimated advertisers pay for 87 percent or so....

2 years, 2 months ago on Magazines Don’t Have a Digital Problem, They Have a Bundling Problem

Reply

Nothing beats the immediacy of a constant online newsfeed.  But credibility is just as important than speed. That's why journalistic institutions evolved, to provide fact-checking, editing, and basic standards on stuff like conflict of interest.  And the stories that provide perspective and context on the news cost even more. 

 

Sure, it's good to engage readers on a one-by-one basis.  But that approach will never pay nearly as much as it takes to support quality journalism. That takes advertisers.  They have proven they'll pay for the right eyeballs in a quality environment. But only a few platforms have so far given them a chance. No wonder we're left with the impression that consumers mainly want an ADD festival of short news bits, celebrity dish, snarky attitude, inflammatory diatribes and other sorts of brain candy.

 

But there's hope. Slowly we're building up the readership data and the online intelligence to recognize a quality readership, and the expertise to monetize it.  Will somebody will have the vision to sell it?

 

 

 

 

 

 

2 years, 2 months ago on Magazines Don’t Have a Digital Problem, They Have a Bundling Problem

Reply

Provocative thesis.  But it makes no mention of the role of advertisers.  Print advertisers are the ones (largely) who pay the salaries and fees of journalists. Without them, all you get is blogging.  For the models you mention to make any sense, they have to include a viable way to charge advertisers a premium for delivering a certain audience.

 

It would be great for this forum to become a place for dialogue on these issues, so please reply if you'd like to advance things.

2 years, 2 months ago on Magazines Don’t Have a Digital Problem, They Have a Bundling Problem

Reply

The concept was great, and the execution often great.

 

The problem is bigger than Pando. The Internet has trained readers, if you want to call them that, to expect the momentary thrill of something ephemeral, often flashy and sometimes trashy. Nobody expects thought content or credibility.  That's why the conventions of journalism, such as proper sourcing, qualification, and fact-checking, mean so little on the Internet. 

 

In many ways the deck is stacked against a product such as Pando. That will change only when advertisers demand a way to distinguish between quality readership and cheap clicks. Perhaps tablet manufacturers will develop a package offering a magazine experience, conferring high expectations and value upon everything in it, and generating the loyal, enthused readers advertisers want to see.

2 years, 2 months ago on A Sad Goodbye to the PandoList and Amanda Schwab

Reply

 @scodtt1 True that., and it must be heaven for a small band of enterprising technologists.   I'd like to see the benefits spill over into the larger community, providing employment for everybody else  like it did for SV and 128.  As a marketer and bizdev person, almost all of my clients have been on the coasts because the local startups never get to that point.

2 years, 2 months ago on Things Move Fast in Boulder: FullContact’s Funding Round Streamlined by Foundry Group

Reply

Well, yes, and on that level this is good news. What would make it amazing is if the company actually sticks around long enough to help develop a critical mass of successful startups.  That would generate the kind of infrastructural support you need to take a company to the next level. 

 

So far what I've seen in Boulder is a mad scramble to the exit event, which is almost always acquisition by somebody on one coast or the other.  Good for the founders, good for the investors, but not so great for anybody else.

2 years, 2 months ago on Things Move Fast in Boulder: FullContact’s Funding Round Streamlined by Foundry Group

Reply

“You can’t get this energy any other way.”  Of course you can. It's called 'acting.'

 

What this dude is shooting for is something else. And that's called 'marketing.'

2 years, 3 months ago on Rob Burnett to SAG: We’re Just Trying to Make an Honest Movie

Reply