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 @chinamike I respect the intimate perspective you bring on business dealings in China.  Running with your example, though, argues for more businesspeople learning Chinese.

1 year ago on Access denied | FP Passport

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 @chinamike  "The only people who may be willing to learn Mandarin...would be someone who will be doing business day to day, week to week with Chinese counterparts in China."

 

This will be the case with increasing frequency as China becomes the planet's biggest economic power.

1 year ago on Access denied | FP Passport

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First off, a "paleo" diet is *not* high in protein.  The US RDA for protein is 15% of calories.  "Paleo" people usually eat around %20 of their daily calories from protein. 

 

Second, who cares what ancestors before Homo Erectus ate?  The paleological evidence shows a marked increase in cranial size, a proxy for brain size, *after* the human branch of hominids started eating meat.  The evidence also shows that by Paleolithic times, humans were apex predators all over the world, based on radiologic isotope analysis of bones from multiple places all around the planet.

1 year, 1 month ago on

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@JakeH

 @JakeH"but one thing you get out of music performance and other performing arts that you don't get from sports is a *product* -- a beautiful piece of art is rendered, live, through your sensitivity and skill."  Only if you develop into a skilled performer.  Otherwise, the end product is painful to create and listen to.  I was a moderately skilled classical pianist as a child, but terrible as a jazz pianist.  I recognized my limitations and dropped the jazz lessons after six months.

If it's a chore to play music and you don't get much better at it with practice, you're going to resent being made to play and the music itself.  Better to let just those who are enthusiastic at it and demonstrate improvement over time choose to continue with it.

1 year, 2 months ago on Conversation @ http://www.newrepublic.com/article/114733/stop-forcing-your-kids-learn-musical-instrument

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 @dnstevenson That's because the new VP of Design just killed a redesign effort that had been going on for 2 years and would have launched in 2013. The new redesign has a quick-and-dirty "mobile first" emphasis, i.e., make the entire site more accessible to mobile devices. 

 

And one thing *has* changed in the past couple of years:  the Profile page.  It used to be just a link farm, and it's now quite usable.  In fact, I've pointed a couple of startups to it as an example of good design.

2 years, 4 months ago on Exactly How Screwed Is PayPal? (Hint: Very)

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 @gsuberland  @Dre_Mane It's PayPal's dirty little secret that most of its profit comes from currency exchange fees on cross-border trade.  The payment volume in the U.S. dwarfs PayPal's other countries, but its margin here is actually declining, due to the increased use of credit cards as a payment method.

 

Regarding the cutoff of WikiLeaks, what decision would you make if a highly-placed request from the the U.S. Dept. of Justice came to your company and told you that one of your small customers was classified as a threat to national security and "asked" that you stop doing business with them?  Would you jeopardize your entire business, risking the wrath of the DOJ, on principle? 

2 years, 4 months ago on Exactly How Screwed Is PayPal? (Hint: Very)

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 @davemackey Second on mentioning Dwolla.  Building a completely new payments network that's simpler and more secure is a neat trick.  Being embraced by credit unions gives them some institutional support.  I can't comment on their API, since I'm not a coder. But Dwolla need some flagship merchants, and that's where Stripe is making more headway (thanks to the connections of its financial backers) than its young competitors.

2 years, 4 months ago on Exactly How Screwed Is PayPal? (Hint: Very)

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