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the burying of the comb is not at all an accurate test. you need heat to break it down. even a home compost would have been a better test for the comb than burying it.

3 months, 2 weeks ago on Are Compostable Utensils Really Compostable?

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you should try this recipe for cream of mushroom soup (http://www.thewickedgoodvegan.com/2011/11/22/vegan-cream-of-mushroom-soup/). it's amazing, much better for you, and it tastes SOO freaking good. and best yet, the only ingredients i can't find in bulk for it (you probably could in northern cali) are the fat (i use coconut oil) and the wine. oh, and wild planet foods sells tuna in a glass jar. the jar looks small, but it actually packs a lot of tuna in it, probably because they don't bother packing it with all the other crap that's in the can.

2 years ago on Confession of an Anti-Plastic Activist Caught Red-Handed With a BPA-Lined Can

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 @BethTerry  beth, i was recently looking up the state law on this since it's becoming time to recycle my sharp items for the first time since moving to cali. where i lived before, as i mentioned, you can just put it in a sharps container and put that container in the recycling bin, after labelling it correctly. apparently, in california, this practice was stopped in 2008. now, in california, you have to dispose of it at specific centers. mine is, thankfully, quite close to me. you can find your local sharps recycler by going to http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/HomeHazWaste/HealthCare/Collection/ and selecting your county. from there, you can zoom in on the map to find the one most convenient for you.

2 years, 2 months ago on Plastic-Free Shaving with a Metal Safety Razor

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so, in the interest of full disclosure, i will say that my experience with sharps boxes is thus far limited to needles for diabetics and recycling those. having said that, what the sharps box does is turn the question for your recycler from "do you recycle razor blades" to "do you recycle steel?" this is because there is no longer a cutting hazard, which is the only thing that distinguishes a feather blade from any other piece of steel. and lots of recycling plants recycle steel because they make a fair bit of money on it. having lived many places, i have never had a problem using a curbside recycling bin for sharps boxes and their contents.

2 years, 4 months ago on Plastic-Free Shaving with a Metal Safety Razor

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beth, the link karen provided is for what is known as a sharps box, which i thought they only made for needles, like for diabetics. the box keeps the sharp objects away from hands until the piece is melted, and it is far enough away from people that no one is touching it anymore anyway. that is the point of a sharps box (it takes away the need for you to go to a metal recycling plant yourself). you collect the blades in there, where they stay safely hidden away while you recycle them normally until nothing is sharp anymore. the sharps box is a single-use long-term storage device, like a piggy bank you have to break to use. because sorting between plastic and metal happens after the recycling leaves people's hands as well, you can use a puncture-proof plastic container (like old prescription bottles that could be repurposed since california won't let you reuse them) for the same purpose, but you have to label it "sharps."

2 years, 4 months ago on Plastic-Free Shaving with a Metal Safety Razor

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What do you do with the blade when it gets dull? Can you get it sharpened? Do you throw it out? Is it recyclable?

2 years, 4 months ago on Plastic-Free Shaving with a Metal Safety Razor

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