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"both companies have some serious questions to answer about their relationship with MI5."

They'd have to answer about their relationship with GCHQ, right?

2 months ago on The Intercept glosses over eBay spying revelations, fails to disclose huge conflict of interest

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I kinda want to go to Braintree, Essex now. I hope they have Starbucks?

2 months, 2 weeks ago on Braintree is a horrible name for a company

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@larryalevine You're looking at this story the wrong way. This isn't about Jobs (or anybody in that group of companies) feeling threatened - it's about them trying to keep down wages. Sure they could have competed for their talent. But it might have cost them tens or hundreds of millions of dollars.

7 months ago on Steve Jobs threatened Palm’s CEO, plainly and directly, court documents reveal

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Max Levchin co-founded Confinity, not X.com :)

1 year ago on PandoMaps: An interactive map of the PayPal Mafia

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Just saw it the first time in a search result. This is awesome.

I wonder how they rank individual articles & decide what exactly to show, but so far it is really useful.

1 year, 1 month ago on A small but significant victory for slow media

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@AnoopSuri Everybody assumed that. But that portfolio was invalidated pretty soon after the sale and isn't really useful anymore.

1 year, 1 month ago on Google spent $12.5B on Motorola for a pink phone

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@AsifIqbalShaik Are you kidding us? He didn't say Lumia didn't sell because of the colors. He said that colors didn't Nokia sell their phones in a position of weakness.

Also: Great that you seem to know exactly what's wrong with Nokia. Here's a hint, though: If building great devices were enough to compete against Samsung in the Android market, HTC would not be failing right now. Or others.

1 year, 1 month ago on Google spent $12.5B on Motorola for a pink phone

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What would be interesting is how the share of the revenues per artist a record label pays the artists has changed over the years, especially compared to the changing cost structures of labels. Digital downloads and streaming bring less revenues than CD and especially Singles sales, but they're also basically free to manufacture and distribute.

Not saying that the difference there would change anything, but it'd be interesting additional information. In the future, I can see the major record labels increasingly be pushed out by newer, more automated, more nimble record labels that help do a lot of work the labels do without doing everything while leaving the major labels handling big artists that can profitably profit from the expensive manual work a label puts in on their behalf.

1 year, 6 months ago on On the fight for fair fees in digital streaming

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@Nevin Dan How is finding a model for high-quality, subscription-based journalism to work profitably not fixing a problem? It's fixing the problem of independent media, which is one of the pillars of Democracy.

Oh, right, you just wanted to rant, providing not a single argument (not even a bad one). Sorry, didn't get that.

1 year, 9 months ago on Shock! Uber scores victory against DC lawmakers by…actually negotiating with DC lawmakers

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@JohnSungKim Github raised $100m from Andreessen-Horovitz.

1 year, 9 months ago on The Series A crunch is hitting now. Have we even noticed?

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@Elthar You felt a disturbance in the force, I feel you haven't used Maps yet and don't know Streetview. They're pretty damn accurate. Also, if the US military trusted Russian maps for invasion plans to Russia, it would be pretty damn stupid.

1 year, 10 months ago on Google’s Ingress is more than a game, its a potential data exploitation disaster

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@fdelane82 The data economy itself is quite frightening (I wouldn't characterize it as terrifying). All this data provides a lot of potential for misuse. And if there's one thing history has shown, it's that if there's something that can be misused, it will be misused. I'm still looking forward to the game and I'm sure I'll play it. Privacy be damned, this looks like a fun game!

1 year, 10 months ago on Google’s Ingress is more than a game, its a potential data exploitation disaster

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@RayCromwell Do I understand correctly that every analysis you don't agree with is clickbait? Laughable.

1 year, 10 months ago on Google’s Ingress is more than a game, its a potential data exploitation disaster

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@sarahcuda I read through a lot of the feedback and I think the people criticizing the font size as too small are using an iPad. I haven't got my iPad with me, so I can't tell you if there's a huge difference there.

Perhaps it's also a bug and I just don't realize it: The letters in the article text are about twice the height of the letters in the comments. (The line altogether is probably three times as high.)

On the iPhone, the font is a bit taller than I'm accustomed to, but quite OK.

1 year, 10 months ago on Welcome to the new, more reader and device aware PandoDaily!

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Wow, where does this trend of huge font sizes come from?! The font in this article is as big as a headline is on other sites! I can't focus on reading anything here. If the idea was to promote long-form journalism - I can say for sure that with font this huge, I can't imagine reading even a paragraph. (I, sadly, didn't read any article today. I try to. I try hard.)

1 year, 10 months ago on Welcome to the new, more reader and device aware PandoDaily!

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 @Parkite Took me a while to get. Nice one! :D

1 year, 10 months ago on If you care about the tech industry, vote for Obama

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Also: Most people don't have the email overload problem and don't get dozens or hundreds of emails per day.

1 year, 11 months ago on On Monday I thought email was dead. On Monday I was an idiot

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 @srcasm Why would that be crazy? Everybody who doesn't block a certain sender that uses a proper emailing service sees the email, whereas with social stuff, the chance the a person sees the thing shared is low. Now think how low the chance is that they convert on something shared on a social channel.

Social works because of scale, with things where not receiving something doesn't really matter. For everything else, email still rules.

1 year, 11 months ago on On Monday I thought email was dead. On Monday I was an idiot

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I guess we all think email is dead because we hate it so much. The thing is: There's no replacement, and there's a need for getting things in your face.

Also, with great email searching tools like Gmail, it's kind of the eternal archive for .. everything.

1 year, 11 months ago on On Monday I thought email was dead. On Monday I was an idiot

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 @Vodkaman  @Thetruthhurtstoo You're right about the splitting up. I think they would really have done better. Funny what happens when you look at things in hindsight.

1 year, 11 months ago on Why the fall of 2012 will determine Microsoft’s fate

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 @Waqas100 Where exactly did I write that Windows 7 was unsuccessful? That's not the point, as was it not the point with Nokia when they created pretty nice phones devices. The problem is that they're missing out on the next wave in computing. If they miss out on tablets, they won't go bankrupt, they won't lose all their market share to Apple. But they won't be able to create integrated solutions in that area. So people will buy their iPad and more and more (like we saw in the previous 10 years) they will switch to Mac computers and laptops. And other alternatives, hopefully. (An Apple monoculture would be even worse than a Microsoft one.)

 

The thing with Skype is: Yes, it is successful. Also, it doesn't make a lot of money. (Still it's a good sign that they bought it. Hopefully they won't mess it up now.)

The thing with Bing is: Microsoft loses a few billion each year on that. Billions. Each year. Incredibly, the losses are increasingly!

Windows Phone is great (never claimed otherwise), but the app problem is a serious problem. As long as Microsoft won't get more users, they won't get more apps. But increasingly, people are basing their purchasing decisions based on the fact whether there are apps available on an OS.

 

Microsoft is doing great. At no point am I refuting that point. The point I'm making is that Microsoft is reaching it's zenith with Windows and is doing bad with the new things that should guarantee their growth for the next decade.

Actually, you are making my point, you just reach a different, very short-term conclusion. One that reminds me of people apologizing for Nokia and RIM.

1 year, 11 months ago on Why the fall of 2012 will determine Microsoft’s fate

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 @jmakabandit That's why I said that hard core gamers aren't the majority, by far. And everybody else doesn't give a shit. And those that don't give a shit are 95% of the market. They are at least 80% of the money to be made. Who do you think game companies will optimize their products for? 20% or 80%? ;-)And if you think Next was a bad system and want to lecture me now about how it was crappy to develop: Apple has improved. Like Microsoft has. I know that Microsoft systems are easier to develop with. But Linux is even easier, which hasn't changed a lot in terms of enterprise support.

 

I'm not a hater. I actually hope that Microsoft succeeds. It's just that I don't see the situation as fluffy. Microsoft once thought they had the browser market all locked up. They were once winning in the smartphone market.

1 year, 11 months ago on Why the fall of 2012 will determine Microsoft’s fate

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 @Vodkaman Nobody says Microsoft will be doomed immediately. But once people use Microsoft only because they *have* to rather than because they *want* to, they are doomed, long term.

 

Yes, there's lots of enterprise software that is and will for the foreseeable future run on Windows devices only. The thing is: The foreseeable future will end at some point. People and organizations will slowly start to move away from that.

 

As for gaming: Steam being on Mac is very relevant. Most gamers aren't hardcore gamers that build their own hardware, so for 95%, Mac is more than enough. Linux is an unknown variable in all that. I stopped giving Linux my yearly one-month trial (where I switched *everything* over to force myself to get used to it) last year and I'm not looking back. (Since I started doing that yearly spring trial about 10 years ago, I haven't seen significant progress. Every single time I spent at least half a day getting my secondary display to work. Every single time, using a laptop was even more painful than a PC. Every single time, I felt like I was getting eye cancer from the incredibly crappy user interface design.)

1 year, 11 months ago on Why the fall of 2012 will determine Microsoft’s fate

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 @bseddon If Microsoft does well, we're all winners. Competition in the mobile space is direly needed and Windows 8 is Microsoft's path to relevancy in the mobile space.

1 year, 11 months ago on Why the fall of 2012 will determine Microsoft’s fate

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 @JanVanRiebeeck Seriously? Microsoft doesn't want to dominate something that would benefit them dominating?

 

The world has changed since Windows ME and Vista. Mac is growing ever stronger. Smartphones are bigger than ever. Microsoft has no foothold in the exploding tablet area. The more tablets people buy (~66m in 2011, probably more than laptops sold 2012) which run a non-Microsoft OS, the more they'll be inclined to switch their main OS to something their tablet works with seamlessly (iPad/iOS --> Mac OS).

 

On the short term, Microsoft will do great. Even on the long term, Microsoft will not simply go bankrupt. But they'll lose influence. And once they lost their influence on the tech market, they'll lose growth areas, because they can't influence the market anymore. Once you can't influence the market anymore, the only thing you can do is follow the market.

 

RIM also had a strong foothold in the enterprise market. Nokia hat a strong foothold in the European market. Microsoft's foothold is stronger and will last longer, but not forever. If they can't get their operating system to be good enough so people use it by choice again, they are fucked - in the long term.

1 year, 11 months ago on Why the fall of 2012 will determine Microsoft’s fate

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 @emeerson Enterprise is being threatened by Linux and supported by Windows on client devices (which Windows server products work together with extremely well), the same can be said about productivity.

Xbox is profitable but not nearly in the same league as Office and Windows. Gaming will continuously move either towards Mac or at least away from Windows (to consoles where Microsoft is a strong player but not the only one), since so many users can't be reached with Windows products anymore. I expect gaming to move in three directions in parallel, weakening Microsoft's position in the market: Mac, consoles and Smartphones. Neither one will crush Microsoft, especially not the third one, but together they can and will take away Microsoft's current advantage in gaming.

1 year, 11 months ago on Why the fall of 2012 will determine Microsoft’s fate

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 @Raul I Lopez Actually it should have been switching away to Mac, but yeah, this was obviously a typo. ;-)

1 year, 11 months ago on Why the fall of 2012 will determine Microsoft’s fate

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 @Waqas100 I seriously hope you're trolling us right now. Calling Bing successful even though Microsoft loses $2b a year on it; calling Windows Phone successful, even though it doesn't sell so far; calling Skype a success, even though they're years away from making a profit on the investment just isn't serious. (I hope each of these products will be successful. I want the competition that can come from a successful Microsoft.)

 

Also, Windows 7 was a really good OS, by far better than Vista, but calling it the best OS out there is a stretch. Don't forget about Mac OS, which is at *least* as good.

1 year, 11 months ago on Why the fall of 2012 will determine Microsoft’s fate

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 @Thetruthhurtstoo Talking about an immoral company: Look at Apple. (No, I'm not a hater. I switched completely over to Apple products and advocate them whenever I can. Because I don't care about the morals of a company but their products.)

 

Talking about an uninnovative company: Look at Google. It took them years to get a consistent user interface in front of their users. Compared to Apple, Palm and Microsoft, *they* are the uninnovative company. Microsoft has its serious flaws. But they're trying hard to do the right thing in recent years. Gotta give credit for that. Unless you're a hater, of course.

1 year, 11 months ago on Why the fall of 2012 will determine Microsoft’s fate

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 @timrpeterson People don't necessarily have to know about their Skype acquisition. They have to feel the positive influence of deep integration with Skype in the product to like their products again.

1 year, 11 months ago on Why the fall of 2012 will determine Microsoft’s fate

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 @JakersUglyBrother That's like saying Nokia will always be great because there are markets where they have extremely loyal customers a few years ago. Yes, it's true. But loyalty lasts only so long. And increasingly, businesses are switching away from Mac. Not all at once, but slowly but surely they are. Microsoft has more time than a company like Nokia, but they will fade unless they can get people to use their products by choice (i.e. buying them as their private devices) rather than by convention (i.e. using them at work because they're forced to).

 

And IBM is an interesting comparison. They managed to do something that few of the former giants of the tech world managed: Staying a huge business.

1 year, 11 months ago on Why the fall of 2012 will determine Microsoft’s fate

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He wrote "inshallah"!! [Insert-islamism-takeover-conspiracy-theory]

1 year, 12 months ago on Taxing Broadband to Save Journalism is One Big, Stupid Idea — We Need a Thousand Small, Smart Ones

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Petraeus makes absolutely no sense for the Republican party as it stands right now. He's way too liberal for Tea Party Republicans and not liberal enough for liberals and many independents. (He wouldn't produce enough of the Independent vote for Romney).

 

Also, he'd turn more attention to foreign policy, which is probably Obama's biggest strength and Romney's biggest weakness.

 

Romney has nothing to gain here: He would't turn out enough Independents, further alienate the far-right vote and change the conversation away from the economy.

2 years, 1 month ago on Conversation @ http://blog.foreignpolicy.com/posts/2012/08/07/sigh_5_reasons_why_david_petraeus_will_not_be_romneys_veep

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