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You all want to know how I know to tell you to ask these questions?  because I didn't ask.   I love my position, and I really like my employer; However, the company does not observe most national holidays, does not give performance reviews, does not give you a raise unless you ask for one, etc.  Now at my age, I can't just find another job, so these policies are something I might have negotiated  when I was hired except that I didn't know these things until I had already hired on. So, while you people are discussing company that can elaborate websites, I am trying to give common sense advice to regular people looking for work.  This article is about questions you should ask before ACCEPTING A POSITION.  Think about it.  Don't assume anything.  If you don't have access to the information, ask.  You can't call up every company and ask anonymously the questions you don't know the answers to.  Many times you think that a position might be transitional, and it ends up to be a company that you stay with for many years.  Know the facts.  Questions about benefits are not proper for a first interview, but they should be addressed before you accept a position, and although you should not have to ask some of the questions I addressed in my original comment about holidays observed and performance reviews, if the company does not have human resources policies written down, you should ask these questions, otherwise you might be hiring on to a company that has unorthodox policies that really surprise you.  After you accept a job is too late to negotiate.

 

2 years, 6 months ago on 11 questions you should ask employers before accepting a job

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 @Amy Allen You can't always find out what these policies are on-line.  I'm not discussing Microsoft, here.  What planet are you from?  Not all firms put their policies on-line.  When the prospective employer says "Do you have any questions?" in your second interview, you should be asking the questions.  Isn't this article about what you should ask BEFORE you accept a position.  Well, this should be asked before you accept a position.  If you find yourself hired into a company that doesn't pay you for the 4th of July, then it's your own fault.  You only have 30 days to file a grievance, and if you quit after you are hired, you can't get unemployment.  I think an employer respects a person who asks questions that affect the rest of their life.  If they don't respect the questions, they might have something to hide.  I would seriously question an employer like you who objects to a savy candidate who wants to know the facts rather than just what you can do for them.  I am not about exacting five minute breaks, but I am about policies.  If employers don't have written policies and don't review employees' work, then stay away.

2 years, 6 months ago on 11 questions you should ask employers before accepting a job

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Those are pretty good questions if you are applying for a sales or marketing position, but what if you are applying for an entry level position or a receptionist spot?  How about asking the most basic questions about the firm?  Sometimes we get excited about the possibility of a position because, in this economy, jobs are difficult to find, and you get to an interview, and you think to yourself, "I really want this."  Do not assume anything about a company.  Ask and secure firm  answers before you accept the job.  Some of these issues can be addressed in a second interview so the first question to be asked is whether or not this interview will be the only interview.  If it is, ask:  1)  What benefits does the company offer, and what is the waiting period before an employee is eligible for them; 2) what holidays does the company observe; 3) what is the vacation policy of the company ( if you get two weeks of vacation, how long before you get three weeks?); 4)  are regular employee reviews done and do employees get increases based on performance at that time or how does that system work? 5) Is there any education assistance provided in the event that you would like to further your education in the field?. 

If your prospective employer gives satisfactory answers to most of the questions you have asked, you can be comfortable hiring on, but if all of the answers are evasive or policies are "see how it goes", then give employment with the company serious thought, especially if this is a move from a current employer.  If the employer says an exception will be made for you in any one area that is contrary to the prevailing policy, ask if you could have that in writing when you accept the position.  That might be hard to ask for, but if they are uncomfortable with giving it, they might not intend to uphold their end of the bargain.

Remember that the confidence which you bring to your interview and the value you place on your skills comes across to your interviewer.  Do not be afraid to ask the questions.  While you don't want to demand too much, you have to remember that the person who doesn't ask, doesn't receive.

2 years, 6 months ago on 11 questions you should ask employers before accepting a job

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