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@ad77 @johnkawakami @BruceMajors4DC Obama isn't that progressive.  I didn't think he was in the first place.  We hoped he'd be responsive to entreaties, but he's only thrown us a few bones here and there.

3 hours, 49 minutes ago on Homophobia, racism and the Kochs: San Francisco’s tech-libertarian “Reboot” conference is a cesspool

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@BruceMajors4DC Your ignorance on the issue is appalling.  Everything's changed in the past few years.

1 day, 9 hours ago on Homophobia, racism and the Kochs: San Francisco’s tech-libertarian “Reboot” conference is a cesspool

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@ad77 @johnkawakami @rbottoms you can think of it as "moving beyond", but I think of it as "not facing reality".  I've been reading, on an off, about (various) communism, anarchism, some extreme right-wing sects, libertarianism (including the LP), and mainstream politics since my teens.  I've been in the Green and P&F parties. So I've been in the area "beyond" the two party dichotomy.

What we have is a two party system.  There are third parties, but they are ineffective for a few structural reasons.  The most effective third party move in recent memory was the "Tea Party", which is a fusion party within the Republican Party.  It was brilliant (and  yes, it was grassroots but became astroturfed quickly).  This system is not simplistic - it's complex, and getting anything accomplished seems difficult.


I'm in the left wing of the Democratic Party with civil libertarian tendencies, and am basically OK with that.  I'm always disappointed :).  I like inside/outside strategies. I can handle working with religious people - and like religious people - even though I'm an atheist. Change is usually slow.  Sometimes, it's not.  The struggle never ends.

1 day, 9 hours ago on Homophobia, racism and the Kochs: San Francisco’s tech-libertarian “Reboot” conference is a cesspool

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@ad77 @rbottoms The Democrats support the separation of church and state.  We have a lot of religious diversity and atheism in the Dem. party.  If you look up "separation of church and state democrats" and you get a lot of organizations upholding it.  If you look up Republicans... well, it's mainly a bunch of attacks on Republicans for not supporting the separation of church and state. So there must be a better term to search for...

Try: "God's law" Republicans.


There you go.

1 day, 21 hours ago on Homophobia, racism and the Kochs: San Francisco’s tech-libertarian “Reboot” conference is a cesspool

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@KennonGilson The conflict within the left is between old line communists and anarchists, mainly because some communists are leaning more anarchist, and anarchism, for some time, had more visibility and was growing faster.  A bit more than 10 years ago, there were conflicts because anarchists tended to publish criticisms of state communism, but today with the general decline of of state communism (succumbing to some kind of neoliberal trend), those critiques aren't made, and that conflict is largely forgotten.  This really doesn't have anything to do with the subject of this article, which is about the growth of elements in the far-right adopting the label of "Libertarians".

Self described progressives tend to be "social democrats" or the left wing of the Democratic Party.  They're the old New Dealers, and are getting weaker within the party, largely due to increasing neoliberalism within the party.  Clinton and Obama are disappointments to us because they enabled or promoted right-wing styles of social welfare.  Progressives were always opposed to Nazisim and Apartheid.


Libertarians have been involved in anti-Fascist and anti-Apartheid organizations and I've met them at demonstrations and online, however, this is also not about *that* faction.  Libertarians have also been anti-war.  These are the old-line Libertarians of the Libertarian Party of 20 years ago and before.  I'd describe these people as "freaks" or people naturally apart from society at large, hoping not to be arrested by the system.


The movement, I think, has been taken over by traditional right wingers, John Bircher types, and Ron Paul and Rand Paul.  These aren't people who are freaks, they're reactionaries.  They are social traditionalists: Christians, socially conservative, uncomfortable with a Black president, heterosexual, 2nd Amendment, white, male, and pro-business.  Some are even pro-war under the guise of The War on Terror. They feel left behind by the changes in society.


BTW, to anyone else reading this, around the world, "libertarian" means the anarchist faction of the left.  "liberal" means pro-business anti-regulation.  So "liberal-libertarian", in an internatlional context, is an oxymorn.  This attempt to take over Anarchist jargon is one of the conflicts between Anarchists and American Libertarians.

2 days, 8 hours ago on Homophobia, racism and the Kochs: San Francisco’s tech-libertarian “Reboot” conference is a cesspool

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@fcLundberg you'd think... but the definition of "libertarian" has changed (again)

6 days, 16 hours ago on Two Valley entrepreneurs nobody really cares about like Rand Paul. Conservatarianism rising!

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@Todd Dunning @johnkawakami I've written to politicians about LGBT rights when that was so controversial several years ago. I generally got form letters back.  Since I'm in a blue state, it wasn't controversial.

As far as laws I was talking about, I was referring to laws prior to the Civil RIghts Act of 65.  Post 65, those laws are now considered unconstitutional, and when they are found, are quickly repealed.  However, that doesn't negate the fact that these laws existed, and some are still on the books.


Post 65, the main group of people who don't have equal civil rights within the law are LGBT people.

Civil rIghts, in practice, are still not equal, however.  The guy who got killed is a civil rights situation - where African American people in NYC under this current gentrification seem to have fewer rights than other people and experience worse treatment from the police.


I think you're the whackjob.  Try writing a letter to someone in government with your ideas and see what happens.

6 days, 17 hours ago on Two Valley entrepreneurs nobody really cares about like Rand Paul. Conservatarianism rising!

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@krrishd @johnkawakami @Todd Dunning It's not necessarily "the government" that opposes gay people or abortion - though it has in the past.  It's other people who hate lgbt people and abortion, and will attack or harass or otherwise interfere.  LGBT people, women, and others are demanding that the government intercede to protect them from people who would otherwise harm them.

6 days, 18 hours ago on Two Valley entrepreneurs nobody really cares about like Rand Paul. Conservatarianism rising!

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@Todd Dunning This is where Libertarians get it all wrong - the idea that lgbt rights, racial justice, abortion, and women's rights are non-issues.  So they ignore these issues.  That's willful ignorance in the fact of numerous laws that have stripped everyone who is not white and who is not male of numerous rights and privileges.

If you don't think these identity-politics issues have no intersection with economics, business, prosperity and liberty... you need to think a little more. 


In NYC, a Black man was choked to death by police because he was selling individual cigarettes.  Why did this happen?


Is it because he was in violation of some fine print on the package that stated that the cigarettes were to be sold as a pack, not individually, so New York's finest took it upon themselves to enforce that contract?

Or is it because NYC is gentrifying, and the cops see the working class and poor African American as "trouble", and using force - a choke hold which has been banned in Los Angeles, incidentally - for social control?

1 week ago on Two Valley entrepreneurs nobody really cares about like Rand Paul. Conservatarianism rising!

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@rbottoms Do you know about Bright Future Jobs?  They're pushing for H1B reform.  There are so few orgs doing anything about this problem, but this is one, and they're working with other organizations.  I donate to them.

If you have a minute, I can give you the rundown about them.  I'll find a way to send you my phone # privately.

1 week ago on Homophobia, racism and the Kochs: San Francisco’s tech-libertarian “Reboot” conference is a cesspool

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@rbottoms @Todd Dunning @deleted_54432724_rrbottoms @paulcarr Just a minor correction about racism in housing.  I don't know about across the country, but in Los Angeles and other areas in California, the restrictive covenants and contracts that limited ownership to whites were innovated in the 1910s. Prior to that, communities were somewhat blended.

This innovation was popular and common as older agricultural subdivisions were developed into the new suburbs. I suspect this was the main reason for white flight - the new housing, which was affordable to all, had racist restrictions.  That left people of color, and some whites like Jews and Southern and Eastern Europeans, to live in older communities.  So urban people moved to the suburbs before the postwar era, but the suburbs were, by contract, mainly for white buyers.


Then in 1948, the SCOTUS ruled that the courts would not enforce the CCRs.  Private discrimination was allowed - but if you could find a non racist who would sell, POC could buy.  This continued until the Rumford Act of 1963 which ended CCRs.

So, pertaining to libertarianism and racism - the market forces conspired to create residential segregation, and the FHA later supported it through redlining.  Then, when the court was leaning toward ending it, the market and FHA continued to perpetuate residential segregation.

Progressives like to say the market and people are racist, and the government is the tool to end it.  Libertarians say the government is racist, and the people and market will end it.  History says racism is perpetuated by the government and the market, and daring individuals fight both to end it.

1 week, 1 day ago on Homophobia, racism and the Kochs: San Francisco’s tech-libertarian “Reboot” conference is a cesspool

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@FromOverThere @Truth_Quest30 It's not popularity as much as political power.  Replacing "Oriental" with "Asian" is a way of demonstrating power.  Denying that minor request is a way of denying power.  It's symbolic - but what about politics isn't?

1 week, 3 days ago on Homophobia, racism and the Kochs: San Francisco’s tech-libertarian “Reboot” conference is a cesspool

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@tpkroger "disruption" sounds more cool than "consolidation" and "monopolization" and "privatized regulation" of the underground "sharing" economy.

1 week, 3 days ago on Homophobia, racism and the Kochs: San Francisco’s tech-libertarian “Reboot” conference is a cesspool

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I had to look up the Gini ratio, but I think you can experience a rise in inequality without a corresponding rise in the Gini if the range of incomes grows and the fraction  of higher-income people grows at the same time, creating a more bimodal distribution.

2 weeks, 5 days ago on Conversation @ http://www.newrepublic.com/article/116479/onion-americas-finest-marxist-news-source

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@EugenePatrickDevany It's hardly an "attack" when compared to Marx, who wanted to eliminate private property.

Let's have a 100% inheritance tax above a half million dollars, a 35% cap gains tax, and a progressive asset tax.  While we are at it, any vacant homes or apartments that aren't rented out in 12 months can be seized and given to the homeless as long as there are more than 0.1% of the population homeless.

1 month, 2 weeks ago on Conversation @ http://www.newrepublic.com/article/118024/piketty-and-marx-where-they-disagree

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@Bud 1 @johnkawakami Ummm. Do you mean center-left American liberals?  I don't really think of the NYT as that liberal or left, more northeastern upper middle class urbanites, but I know that self-described conservatives think of the NYT as a bastion of pinko Democrats.


1 month, 2 weeks ago on Conversation @ http://www.newrepublic.com/article/118024/piketty-and-marx-where-they-disagree

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What about the huge influence of laissez faire, Adam Smith, and marginalism?

1 month, 2 weeks ago on Conversation @ http://www.newrepublic.com/article/116479/onion-americas-finest-marxist-news-source

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@Bud 1 What do you mean by "liberal"?  There are the American and international definitions, which are different.  If you mean Democrats, you're wrong to point your finger at them, as most of the advocacy for "free trade" comes from Republicans.  This is an issue that cuts across party lines, and there are "free trade" advocates in both parties, and they are the dominant group.  The critics of "free trade" are in the minority, and, again, are in both parties, but mainly in the populist left. The populist right is split between libertarians and xenophobes.

The roots of this trade ideology are in the ideas of comparative advantage innovated by David Ricardo.  The main people pushing it are the economic liberals; that is the international definition of "liberal", which means that trade should be unrestricted by tariffs, and businesses should pay low taxes.  The constituency most interested in this are large businesses that can move manufacturing operations to other countries.


The New Republic, I think, is a "liberal" magazine in that way.  I never felt it was "liberal" in the sense of being aligned with Democrats, and most definitely not aligned with the left.

1 month, 2 weeks ago on Conversation @ http://www.newrepublic.com/article/118024/piketty-and-marx-where-they-disagree

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@ChristopherHart @johnkawakami @fbaldy @KarlFaulstich @jeregol Incidentally, there is data that supports my statement about drinking.  Drinking correlates with income, and the people earning around 25k per year have an alcohol use rate of around 25%, while people earning over (I think) 80k per year are above 75%.  It's a dramatic difference.

1 month, 2 weeks ago on Conversation @ http://www.newrepublic.com/article/117973/why-has-there-been-no-great-recession-backlash-against-plutocracy

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It went to 18 then in 1940 went to 14. War started in 41 causing unemployment to basically go to zero but it showed up as 9 on the tables so i assumed it is an average. The socialist fixes i'm talking about were the public works projects and jobs programs. A lot of it was stuff the private sector didnt and doesnt do. What industry records folk music and interviews poor folks? What enterprise builds bridges and dams? None. The alphabet soup was pretty careful about not stepping on the toes of the private sector. They did overlap, but they made up some odd things, like hiring a bunch of artists and writers.

1 month, 2 weeks ago on Conversation @ http://www.newrepublic.com/article/117973/why-has-there-been-no-great-recession-backlash-against-plutocracy

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Another thing - I think the thesis is incorrect, that there won't be an uprising.  There will be, but not from the Baby Boomers.  Gen X and later generations have a different perspective, and reality has been a lot harder on these generations.  The last period of widespread propserity for white people was the late 90s, and even that was not as good as the 80s.  The last period of widespread black prosperity was the 70s, with a middle class breaking away by the 1990s.  A lot of people have existed in an economic downturn or recession - and that causes a lot of people to be upset.

The old middle class uprisings were by a middle class that was far more working class than what we consider "middle class".  Likewise, the next uprisings will be from the middle class who are a lot less "middle class" than the middle class of the 1980s.

1 month, 2 weeks ago on Conversation @ http://www.newrepublic.com/article/117973/why-has-there-been-no-great-recession-backlash-against-plutocracy

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@ChristopherHart it was 14% in 1940.  24.75% in 1933 was the highest unemployment.  The alphabet soup of socialist fixes helped reduce the unemployment number - but anecdotes indicate that the wages were very low.  From u-s-history.com.

1 month, 2 weeks ago on Conversation @ http://www.newrepublic.com/article/117973/why-has-there-been-no-great-recession-backlash-against-plutocracy

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I think this missed a few more obvious reasons why the response has been less intense. In the GD, it took 3 years, but unemployment hit 25%.  We got to something like 12% or so.  Before the GD, home ownership rates were low.  During this recession, home ownership rates are around 50%.  This capital can act as a buffer for families, when an unemployed relative moves in.  Back before the GD, there were few welfare programs.  During this one, we've had a lot of welfare; 20% of families (i think) got food stamps.  That's a huge stimulus for grocery stores and agriculture.  Unemployment was extended multiple times.  Again, that's basically stimulus spending.

During the GD, the reforms used to help the economy were to create jobs directly, to establish the FHA, and establish social welfare.  Well, due to the existence of these things, the people didn't have to fight for them.  Thus, there was less political activity around these key needs.

1 month, 3 weeks ago on Conversation @ http://www.newrepublic.com/article/117973/why-has-there-been-no-great-recession-backlash-against-plutocracy

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@Jonette Christian The overall population has increased, too.  I think the great divergence is due primarily to technology, specifically robots, highly engineered workplaces, and the computer, which is at the center of everything.  When you introduce technology, you either eliminate jobs or reduce job growth, and save money.  However, you don't eliminate all the cost - some of the cost is paying for the technology, and there's an ongoing labor cost to operate the equipment.

The high tech companies captured a lot of the money from the productivity gains, which is why there's gentrification happening wherever there's tech money.

And the reduced labor costs created the other side - the growth in poverty.

1 month, 3 weeks ago on Conversation @ http://www.newrepublic.com/article/117973/why-has-there-been-no-great-recession-backlash-against-plutocracy

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@ChristopherHart @fbaldy @KarlFaulstich @jeregol Ever since I stopped drinking, I started noticing something: poor people don't drink too much, or do too many drugs.  Working class people do some more, but it's the middle class who seem to use the most intoxicants.  They also seem to have the most affairs and marital infidelity, at least among the people I know.  It just gets hushed up because middle class people have a professional reputation maintain.

With poor people, the infidelity or addiction becomes part of the local lore - mainly as a kind of warning to others that it's not good to associate with said "bad person".

1 month, 3 weeks ago on Conversation @ http://www.newrepublic.com/article/117973/why-has-there-been-no-great-recession-backlash-against-plutocracy

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@ChristopherHart @fbaldy @Salemst @KarlFaulstich @jeregol That's odd.  The way I remember it, the smart kids who were rich went on the management track, and the poor ones went on the more technical or accounting track.  The rich networked more, because that was they way to retain their wealth.  The poor networked as well, but eventually figured out that their way into the system was to sell their skills to a rich person.  So they'd become engineers or accountants, get into the middle class, and have some stability, but the deal was, they'd work their ass off so a wealthier person in management could take a longer vacation.


Many poor kids didn't do well in school, but it seemed to be the same for the rich - except the rich would try over, get tutors, and so forth.  The poor would just get depressed and drop out, not realizing that they could probably find tutoring help.

1 month, 3 weeks ago on Conversation @ http://www.newrepublic.com/article/117973/why-has-there-been-no-great-recession-backlash-against-plutocracy

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@ChristopherHart @FranzLiebkind @Salemst @fbaldy @KarlFaulstich @jeregol I'm a resident of a poor community, with drug sales, and have been on and off for two decades.  The people who come into the area to buy drugs are of all classes.  The reasons why drug sales are here are due to reduced regulations, high unemployment, and police corruption.  The reasons why it's lower in wealthier neighborhoods are increased police regulations, lack of access to low wage labor, and the residents there have cars and can drive to the ghetto to buy their drugs and get their d--- sucked.

1 month, 3 weeks ago on Conversation @ http://www.newrepublic.com/article/117973/why-has-there-been-no-great-recession-backlash-against-plutocracy

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I've met bus drivers who have a "thing" to keep the folks at front entertained.  They don't go show biz about it, but it keeps their job fun and I think it keeps the ride a little safer because it makes it easier to deal with dramatic riders.  One dude went on crazy party vacations and shared his photos.  Some people are just about putting their personalities out there.  So, it's not unique to Lyft.

7 months, 3 weeks ago on The Prince of Lyft: How one micro entrepreneur is ridesharing his way to stardom

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It sounds like the future stuff is more one-size-fits-all, or 50 sizes fit many.  Today, it's not really one size.  There are supplemental workbooks you can buy, video tutorials, hired tutors, some kids get time with the teacher, some kids have parents who are smart or well educated, some kids have decent access to a library at home, or access to the public library.  The computer adds one more.

I sense there's a great hope that software-based learning will fix everything, but my feeling is it will help a lot, but you'll reach the plateau quickly.

The main thing it provides is immediate feedback, so you can know if you got the right answer, immediately.  If you got it wrong,  you can try again.   So you can address misunderstandings quickly.

It's still "mass production" but with more feedback.  It's mass production with constant quality control.

7 months, 3 weeks ago on iHave a Dream: The unanswered questions behind LA’s ed tech fiasco

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The main thing the iOS environment brings is easy software installation.  You click around, and it's installed.  Installing software was a huge impediment for people, particularly Windows users.  That's why many people feel they can't "do much" with computers - they aren't installing new software and trying it out.


Now, people install all kinds of software, and feel like they are in control of the system.  Of course, the irony is that IOS is the most closed, most controlled, most "locked-down" operating systems out there (maybe the Kindle is worse).  The user really has little control over the computer, but because their prior experiences were so constricted, they feel freed.

It's like driving stick versus driving automatic.  Stick is harder, and requires more work, but people who drive stick feel more in control.   Automatic makes driving more accessible to more people, so more people feel able to experience the freedom of driving.

As noted above, I like Linux.  Linux used to be like building a car from crates of parts.  Today, it's more like a pre-built kit car... with this layer of magic to install software IOS-style. (Or maybe we should say IOS installs like RedHat Linux, because Linux really made simple installation an important feature of system administration.)

7 months, 3 weeks ago on iHave a Dream: The unanswered questions behind LA’s ed tech fiasco

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They could have gotten laptops for less, and loaded them with Linux.  Then, with regard to software, they could contract that out to a company that would design the software.

7 months, 3 weeks ago on iHave a Dream: The unanswered questions behind LA’s ed tech fiasco

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 @BethTerry It pops up if you use tax software.  The one I use asks a question about buying a car - that's just the typical situation that triggers the deduction.  Your total sales taxes have to exceed your deduction for state income taxes paid - my state income taxes are kind of high so it usually exceeds sales taxes.  I believe that if your state doesn't collect income tax, you can deduct sales taxes.  You should look it up.

2 years, 2 months ago on Get a Bag and a Receipt: When Social and Environmental Justice Collide

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 @Will Terry That's a totally different situation.  You saw a crime and pursued.  Zimmerman didn't see a crime and pursued.

2 years, 2 months ago on Get a Bag and a Receipt: When Social and Environmental Justice Collide

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 @EcoCatLady The women's lib movement was about more than work, but it ended up being about work, and mainly about white middle class women's work issues - specifically access to white collar jobs.  The number of white women working went up, but for women of color and white working class women, the numbers didn't change much, because they were already working.  The issues facing women in blue-collar, manual labor jobs, still exist today and haven't been adequately addressed.  You look in the construction trades, which are the best paid manual labor jobs, and there were and are few women, and the women who are there tend to be very thick-skinned about sexism, out of necessity.  The split in pay between people who do "womens' work" and "mens' work" hasn't been fully addressed either.The real answer, which was pushed people both men and women considered wacky feminists, was to reduce the number of hours worked, and to pay women (and eventually men) for raising children.  "Wages for Housework" was the call, and if we valued housework the way we value, say, used-car salespersons, we'd have more compensation for housework.

2 years, 2 months ago on Get a Bag and a Receipt: When Social and Environmental Justice Collide

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 @BethTerry If you spend a lot of money one  year, you can deduct sales taxes.

2 years, 2 months ago on Get a Bag and a Receipt: When Social and Environmental Justice Collide

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Well... look at where poor people live.  That's where they site the most polluting industries.  The people work all day, maybe two jobs, and don't have the political power or often the physical energy to resist these toxic developments.  People with means can often resist - the community is usually educated, old people are retired and have time, and people have 40 hour per week jobs, and usually there are a couple people around who've "made it" and have time and money to spend.  So their communities don't get industries that pollute, and aren't cut up by freeways.  But, since they don't really expand their NIMBY fight to anywhere outside of their area, the businesses site themselves in poor communities that don't or can't fight back.

2 years, 2 months ago on Get a Bag and a Receipt: When Social and Environmental Justice Collide

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One other thing - one way to prepare hachiya persimmons is to hang them.   Found this: http://thesecretyumiverse.wonderhowto.com/blog/make-hanging-dried-persimmons-hoshigaki-0131492/

2 years, 2 months ago on How To Store Produce Without Plastic

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I do what my mom discovered - just wrap the food in newspaper.  The paper gets moist in the crisper and helps to regulate the humidity.

2 years, 2 months ago on How To Store Produce Without Plastic

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 @FG I think Singapore is a country that, like Saverin, realizes that freedom is purchased, not earned.  He's buying additional freedom in a country that seems designed to benefit the wealthy.  There's no need for democracy when the rich are kept happy, is there?

2 years, 2 months ago on What Eduardo Saverin Owes America (Hint: Nearly Everything)

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 @mscommerce What alternate reality are you in?  You're talking about anarchism, not the United States.  Haven't you read the original text of the Constitution?

2 years, 2 months ago on What Eduardo Saverin Owes America (Hint: Nearly Everything)

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 @v_ferauge I think that's fair.  I thought as much about the numerous Filipinos who staff our hospitals.  Also, I think that people who move to the US should seek to become citizens and permanent residents.  I'm ok with Saverin renouncing - I'm not okay with him dodging taxes.  If anything, this and other tax-sheltering schemes should really motivate governments to harmoize their tax laws so companies can't avoid their responsibilities to the countries in which they do business.

2 years, 2 months ago on What Eduardo Saverin Owes America (Hint: Nearly Everything)

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 @shaker cherukuri I believe there are taxes for people who expatriate, but it's the timing here that's at issue.  If he expatriates later, he'll be taxed on the likely rise in stock prices after the IPO.  If he does it now, he's going to pay taxes on the current value of the stock, which is based on some magic, perhaps somewhat made-up guess about the company's assets and value.

2 years, 2 months ago on What Eduardo Saverin Owes America (Hint: Nearly Everything)

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 @JaimeAndresPretell There's also the entire middle part of the continent, which was invaded.

2 years, 2 months ago on What Eduardo Saverin Owes America (Hint: Nearly Everything)

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 @sadfpoi This is so true.  The scale of the US is something to consider.  (Yes, China is larger... maybe that's why Saverin is moving to Asia) Europe is fairly close in wealth and size to the US, but there's no unifying language or legal system that enables a company like Facebook to operate at the scale it's operated.  Also, American imperialism, like it or not, has helped shape the internet's spread in other countries, and before the internet, it pushed the English language into these countries.  (Look at how many Japanese think they can speak English.  It's because they've all been taught English in school.)  Widespread use of English, globally, benefits all the companies that operate in the countries of the old Commonwealth and the US.

2 years, 2 months ago on What Eduardo Saverin Owes America (Hint: Nearly Everything)

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How about the rich don't pay any tax at all?

2 years, 2 months ago on What Eduardo Saverin Owes America (Hint: Nearly Everything)

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 @bwin How about he renounces after the IPO?

2 years, 2 months ago on What Eduardo Saverin Owes America (Hint: Nearly Everything)

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 @Gerson Paull  He might try to give away a lot in Brazil, too.  It would help the cause of his class (the super-wealthy) by perhaps discouraging kidnappings.

2 years, 2 months ago on What Eduardo Saverin Owes America (Hint: Nearly Everything)

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 @BrenoBacci (I like your posts - I always learn something new.)

2 years, 2 months ago on What Eduardo Saverin Owes America (Hint: Nearly Everything)

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