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Most of these issues you raise can be put at Apple's door. Thats not to say they're not very real issues as far as the end user is concerned - but they are probably unique to the iOS platform.

Its Apple that has imposed the tax on in-app purchases, which is likely vdio makes you go to their web site to buy, then return to the app. That's just how the iOS Kindle app works, for the same reason.

AirPlay support is just the same. Vdio are stuck on Apple's world, and are reliant on them. Spotify works on AirPlay. Except that it doesn't - unless I first open the Apple music player, play a sing, turn on AirPlay and then switch to Spotify.

Really the article should be pitched that "the restrictions and rules of working in the iOS environment make it impossible for vdio or any other wannabe ITunes product to really be any good".

That would probably be a fair comment.

1 year, 6 months ago on Vdio: The wannabe iTunes replacement for absolutely nobody

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 @PXLated  @KenG "Apple offered Samsung a license" sounds a bit like Apple offering me an iphone for a reasonable, market-based price when I pop in to an Apple store.

 

These deals are not a simple sale and purchase.

 

The way these deals normally go down is a tough negotiation, where Apple offers a license at a way high price (which they're prepared to move on if they have to), and simultaneously threatens to sue if the license is not taken up. In return Samsung tries to negotiate down the license price by talking up its chances should things go to court. Most of the time a negotiated outcome is reached. Not in this case though.

 

Rather than "they turned down the offer", you should say " the parties could not agree on the terms for a license" - that reflects the reality.

2 years, 1 month ago on The Enemy of My Enemy Is My Friend: Apple Needs to Take Care of Google Before It Goes After Amazon

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@sarahlacy@mraswan

One thing I took away from this article was a sense of deep admiration for Sophia for creating a kick arse business without giving a rats arse about the things that often distract founders - i.e. the struggle to get funding and to conform to the whims of the valley.

 

Before I read this I knew that I knew nothing about the fashion industry.

 

But after reading Sarah's analysis of why Sophia understands the fashion world, I realised that "nothing" was overstating it by a long way. Good luck to anyone who can navigate their way in these mysterious waters!!

 

2 years, 1 month ago on The Science of Badass: How Nasty Gal Avoided Ecommerce Gimmicks and Silicon Beach to Bank $40m and a New Line

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Atlassian is always mentioned in this type of analysis.

 

However they are quite different, because their users (and purchase decision makers) are also by nature very technical people who revel in configuring Atlassian to meet their needs. Thats the main secret sauce behind having no sales force.

2 years, 2 months ago on What’s Still Holding Back a Small Business Software Revolution

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There's only a few things we know for sure about Scott Thompson from the outside...

 

1) He put new meaning into the label "hard-charging" in the few months he was running Yahoo.

2) He's unafraid to make extremely unpopular decisions (patent fight with FB)

3) He lied on his resume

 

What we will never know is whether he might have actually been good for Yahoo - personally I doubt it, but who really knows.

 

For a small outfit like ShopRunner ($100 million sales in 2011), this could be a fantastic hire.

2 years, 3 months ago on Scott Thompson Joins ShopRunner as CEO: Um, I Guess Everyone Deserves Another Chance?

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Great thesis but there's one thing you haven't mentioned - Steve Jobs. Or more precisely, his absence.

 

Anyone who has tried to ship a difficult multi-stranded tech platform knows just how hard it as at a technical level - then throw in design, marketing, and steering a gigantic ocean liner of a company around until it points in your direction.

 

It takes a genius, and Jobs was a genius. There is no genius following him.

 

Just as Microsoft started their long slow slide into oblivion just about when Bill Gates moved out, Apple too will follow.

 

Right now, there's a lull. The question is, what will Apple do now? Whats the next big innovation? Will the next ipad have a 7" screen? Will Apple do a TV?

 

The real question should be - when the next innovation falls short (as even some of Jobs' did), how will the market react?

 

The long slow slide starts now.

 

 

 

 

2 years, 6 months ago on Everybody Chill Out: Apple is a Long-Term Goldmine

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