Livefyre Profile

Activity Stream

@thelucklessgoat @StephenKahn That's a nice theory, but it collides with the reality of Sudbury students actually learning the building blocks and actually going on to college and university and actually doing quite well, as well as doing well at their jobs. It also collides with the reality of many kids going to the "traditional" rote-based schools and graduating with all the mathematical dexterity of a turnip. 

6 months ago on Conversation @ http://www.newrepublic.com/article/116015/sudbury-valley-school-alternative-education-right-my-kids

Reply

Studies show that many students from existing schools do not know much about Martin Luther King, or anything else which we consider to be the "standard" set of political, economic, or historical knowledge. It seems unfair to select a sample of one and ask him to represent the entire student body. It may be that other folks at Sudbury are passionate about civil rights, history, and so forth. 

6 months ago on Conversation @ http://www.newrepublic.com/article/116015/sudbury-valley-school-alternative-education-right-my-kids

Reply

You may find this relevant: partisanship selectively switches off one's math abilities whenever they would contradict one's political beliefs. 

http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2013/09/new-study-politics-makes-you-innumerate

10 months, 3 weeks ago on Partisanship Makes You Stupid

Reply

 This is good news re: nullification, and it also strongly suggests that people are no longer turning to the "mainstream" for their news and views. 

1 year, 2 months ago on Rasmussen Poll: Nullification Goes Mainstream

Reply

I would turn this argument around. If Adam and Barry next door are married, odds are that they'll be more protective of their relationship, and your husband won't be sneaking next door. 

1 year, 4 months ago on Steve King: To understand why govt is involved in marriage is to understand why it cannot validate SSM

Reply

Suppose Ron Paul won the nomination and were elected; this would not be the only change, by a long shot. There are already many fans of Dr. Ron Paul and his ideas who are seeking nominations for Congress; it is reasonable to believe that they also would be elected. The composition of Congress would be changed somewhat. In 4 or 8 years of office, President Paul would demand from Congress some of the "big ideas" which he has been promoting for years - bringing our soldiers home (which he can do unilaterally), reducing the budget by $1 trillion immediately, shuttering several departments, competitive currencies, and so forth. He'd get pushback from Congress, but Congress would get pushback from those who elected Dr. Ron Paul; surely some of these ideas would be implemented. Contrast this with a Paul Ryan or Mitt Romney, candidates who propose nothing more radical than slight reductions in the rate of growth of the federal budget. You can see why supporters of Dr. Ron Paul are not getting excited by the dismal alternatives.

2 years, 3 months ago on Libertarian Button Pushers and Political Compromise

Reply