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Truly silly. I wonder how these projects get greenlighted by corporate.

4 months ago on Pants that can charge your cellphone are a silly idea that more wearable tech manufacturers should take to heart

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Pity that vast progress on a wide scale is being so severely held back. Hard to argue a $14K to $300 price reduction doesn't indicate past screwing of the public interest. Those patent protected prices permitted 95% gross margins to exist at the expense of consumers.

4 months, 2 weeks ago on Expiring patents were supposed to boost the 3D printing market. They haven’t

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@TedRall He was listed as an attendee. There were no newsworthy revelations beyond him just being there and what his profession was and what his actual name was. No news, inadvertent disclosure of name. Looks pretty ok to me.

4 months, 4 weeks ago on By agreeing to redact name of CIA chief, 6000 journalists reveal themselves as pathetic, cowardly hacks

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Oh I don't know. It seems they mistakenly released the station chief's name against his wishes. Just like getting an unlisted phone number doesn't really make you anonymous, but it's still worth doing to cut down on the amount of unwanted calls. Sounds reasonable to ask those journalists present to redact his name from their articles. I don't see a compelling public interest in knowing the CIA's leader in Afghanistan's name, and don't see the harm in keeping it confidential.

5 months ago on By agreeing to redact name of CIA chief, 6000 journalists reveal themselves as pathetic, cowardly hacks

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@CareyGister @alberthartmanEveryone is encumbered - the old by their family obligations, the young by being stupid and inexperienced. The system looks for success. Any success that happens quickly has everyone duplicating every aspect of it in hopes of getting their own big win. Maybe it's wearing hoodies, or living in a SF loft, or hob nobbing with bankers in NYC, making an iApp mini game, or maybe backing teenagers. The investors follow the last win. When a breakout hit happens with a 65 yo domain expert at its helm, you'll see all the industry looking for gray hairs.

5 months ago on Startups Anonymous: “Younger founders can kiss my ass.”

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<<There seems to be two opposing forces: young founders and old founders.>> Seems to me the two different groups are those who are finding the formula and those who aren't.

5 months, 1 week ago on Startups Anonymous: “Younger founders can kiss my ass.”

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I came away inspired. I've been to nearly every MF so far. The amazing thing to me is what ordinary people can accomplish technically. The things folks can build using open source and readily available tools with the ecosystem that's built up around them now rivals what only the best companies could do just a short while ago. And as for creative ideas, the homemade maker crowd vastly exceeds their corporate peers. When is the last time you heard something really creative come out of a Sharp, or Panasonic, or Sony? Kickstarter, MakerFaire types is where you discover modern cool things. You weren't impressed? I saw the future where people are equipped to solve their own tech needs, however sophisticated, and whatever those needs happen to be. When people can do for themselves, whole industries get turned upside down and progress leaps forward.

5 months, 1 week ago on At Maker Faire 2014, a mix of ideology and aimlessness

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A new large-scale technology that is intended to undergird the future public infrastructure is fair game for taxpayer subsidies.

Solar still an emerging technology that was invented and improved on public money (R&D and military). It has improved marvelously (arguably near oil parity). But oil parity is not the measure of when to terminate public support. The measure for when to terminate public support is when it has solved its major technical challenges (say 80%?). By that metric solar still needs lots of public support. The public electrical grid is not setup to safely accommodate the massive numbers of distributed power sources that it will have (everyone's rooftops, everywhere). The grid still has no way to store solar daytime-generated energy for nighttime use, that needs massive and expensive new ideas and development - perfect for subsidies. Building codes and grid rules for safe installation and operation of distributed solar is still not known and is a costly adoption obstacle with plenty of conflicting incumbent agendas.

Oil needed legislative help in the early days because they needed access to vast regions in the midwest and offshore waters. It needed R&D help to find best practices on wastes management. But over the last 100 years the industry has largely solved its major technical challenges and can use its own financial resources for the small remaining further progress.

Nuclear energy needed public subsidies to reach its potential as well. It needed access to cooling water resources, safe waste disposal locations, materials and design knowledge for effective and safe practices. It has largely solved its toughest science & technical problems, reached 80% or so of its potential, and can reach its final improvements financed solely by its own ratepayers.

But how far can solar as the successor energy technology go? It can surely reach parity with current carbon sources. Can it exceed it to where it gets to one quarter the current price? One tenth the price? Can it be delivered to consumers anywhere at little to no cost? Can the dream of energy too cheap to meter actual happen? Copious energy would solve fresh water for everyone (ocean desalinization), give easy and fast transportation everywhere, food, housing. Solved energy would solve so many of humanities problems. Stop subsidizing solar when the major technical obstacles are solved and its ultimate potential is largely achieved, and not until then.

6 months, 2 weeks ago on Now can we stop subsidising solar?

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The subsidy arguments both for and against all sound persuasive to me. I suggest we go with what has worked in the past. We should stop all subsidies when the total amount of tax-payer funded support to solar equals the total amount of tax-payer subsidies the oil, coal, and nuclear industries have received. After all, why mess up what has worked so well in the past?

6 months, 2 weeks ago on Now can we stop subsidising solar?

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Completely agree. The severe caps on amounts raised ($1M annually) and onerous paperwork requirements make the JOBS act a no-go for serious startups. It's a shame because that was not the intention. We'll just have to wait and see if the politicians will go back and fix it so it can work.

7 months, 2 weeks ago on New Money: How the JOBS Act reshapes crowdfunding

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Those e-cigarette vaporizers only become cool when they become the must-have technology for a newly-deregulated pot industry.

9 months, 1 week ago on Can we please have a rational discussion about e-cigarettes?

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@ParitoshSharma@JesusChristSiliconValley Sounds cool, P. Will check it out.

9 months, 4 weeks ago on The hidden Kickstarter industry

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@TheseLongWars By itself "venture consumers" won't sustain a newly-formed business. But initial success with them serves as 3rd party validation that real investors/biz partners want to see before engaging. And yes, there are several examples of companies that started that way and are well along with real employees being paid enough to raise families on.

9 months, 4 weeks ago on The hidden Kickstarter industry

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@JesusChristSiliconValleyContent curation indeed. It's the primary difference I see between KS and IGG.

10 months ago on The hidden Kickstarter industry

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Excellent summary!

10 months ago on The hidden Kickstarter industry

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Dropping the money OS is actually very forward looking. If you believe Jean Luc Piccard, and I do, he says that in the future the acquisition of wealth is no longer a driving force since all material want has been eliminated. Instead it's the pursuit of self-betterment that is the motivation of people in the future.

1 year ago on Operating on a character driven OS

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The entire attitude around HW startups will change the moment great exits start rolling in. But who are the exit equivalents for HW like Google, Yahoo, Microsoft are for SW?

1 year ago on Hardware is the new software? Nope, says Marc Andreessen. “It’s called hardware for a reason — it is hard”

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Many transactional businesses had incumbents pushed aside when technology brought the unwashed masses into their industry, through new distribution and marketplaces (print media, recorded content, broadcast, IT, news, sharing-hotel/cabs, brick&mortar retail, ...). In general, it resulted in a larger overall industry (but perhaps less total profit). The focus now is on startup investing. 

A question remains whether newbie smallish investors with sudden access can stand to be in a game where they could lose their money. The popularity of Las Vegas and the stock market suggests yes. Now patience for a 10-year fund payout, maybe no - need faster solutions.

More money is usually good news.

1 year ago on AngelList syndicates are changing seed investing, whether VCs like it or not

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It's the same math as bricks & mortar if the game you are playing is cash flows. If the game you are playing is roulette and waiting for your big win then the math is pretty simple - keep wagering until your lucky number comes up. There's just a disagreement about what the venturing game is.

1 year, 5 months ago on It always comes down to math

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Maybe there are other graduation speeches. But there is no question on which commencement address stood heads and shoulders above the others. Is their any doubt about which one will be listened to and stand the test of time as one of the greatest grad speeches given ever? The delivery and advice Steve Jobs gave was masterful. It is the only speech I can recall of his where he dropped his manipulation tools and gave a talk intended to offer his best personal advice to an audience just starting their lives out, versus serving some other agenda where he held an interest (i.e. Apple's benefit). Incredibly genuine & generous.

1 year, 5 months ago on Five tech commencement speeches from the last five years

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Information and energy are siblings separated at birth (the big bang). Information without energy is ineffective and unimportant. Energy without information is purposeless. The best happens when you connect them. Each needs the other.

1 year, 5 months ago on The economics of energy, industry, and the Internet

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Let me get this straight: investment industry overserving current market (VCs throwing boatloads of money at same fifteen rockstar startups), large underserved market below (scrappy, iffy startups). According to Disruption Theory this sounds like fertile ground for a new finance entrant with a business model targeting the underserved, and that grows up from there.

1 year, 9 months ago on The VC’s paradox: We can’t all be black swans

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In many fields, the leaders are becoming older. In the early 1900's 60% of physics laureates did their prizewinning work before turning 40yo, at the late 1900's only 19% did. Chemistry laureates before 1905 did their seminal work at average age of 36yo, after 1985 they averaged 46yo. [ref: WSJ "The 'Eureka' Moments Happen Later"]. The critical factor seems to be if the field is brand new or has been around a long time.

1 year, 9 months ago on A world safe for 39-year-olds

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If there's a theme song for this, I'd pick Steely Dan's "Everything Must Go". http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d2nbAtceHqw

1 year, 11 months ago on The last day

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Training new management for NYC branch?

1 year, 11 months ago on Chris Dixon is not only joining Andreessen Horowitz; he’s leaving New York

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You nailed it! The tangible world is changing so fast that it will be unrecognizable in just a few years time. For those who make it their business to look forward, heed this observation. There's a land grab underway, and the best spots in this new space are being claimed right now.

2 years ago on It’s Time to Stop Saying Hardware Is a Commodity Business — Only Bad Hardware Is a Commodity

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Very smart. I wonder if they are capable of doing something like this?

2 years, 2 months ago on Best Buy Needs to Fund the Hardware Revolution by Launching a Kickstarter Competitor

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I'd like to hear the whole interview sometime.

2 years, 6 months ago on Roger McNamee: ‘What Is Google So Afraid Of?’

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Wonder if the type of companies invested in will change - or just earlier in the process with the same ones.

2 years, 6 months ago on Kleiner Perkins Partner Aileen Lee Starting a New Seed Fund

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It brings new money into the system. Businesses with plans that don't match the billion dollar exit or acquihire models currently required for funding may find another opportunity. Financially viable cash-flow generating businesses, revenues in the low double digit millions, regionally-restricted products/services can find supporters. These are largely untouchable via traditional financing sources. I'm withholding judgement on this bill and hoping to see new innovations created and being pleasantly surprised.

2 years, 6 months ago on Welcome to the Wild West of Suckers, Lawyers, and Snake Oil Salesmen

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