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It is very misleading to say that he repeatedly spoke about his computer science degree.

It is obvious from the interview, recorded in 2009, that Thompson was talking from his 30 years of experience since graduating in 1979. He may have had no idea that Moira Gunn was in any way referring to a degree he did thirty years earlier.

 

Keep this in mind, he did his BS degree between 1975 and 1979. How many universities even had computer science degrees back then? How many even had computer science subjects?

According to MIT they award their first CS degree in 1975:

http://www.eecs.mit.edu/facts

 

How many computer science subjects did Steve Wozniak take?

Oh, that's right he withdrew from his degree after first year!

My point is that back then people didn't learn computer science at university they taught themselves.

Thompson has a degree in something which is a hell of a lot more than a lot of other people can say.

 

If people want to lynch Scott Thompson it should be squarely related to how he is managing Yahoo, not because someone (supposedly a recruiter) doesn't understand how university degrees work, or is gunning for huge placement fee. 

 

As I said, in a comment on the article, the key questions are:

"When Thompson applied for his job at PayPal what did his personally prepared resume say, if it existed.", and

"When Thompson applied for his job at Yahoo what did hid personally prepared resume say, if it existed."

 

Quite clearly his public LinkedIn profile says, BS from Stonehill College.

 

Personally, I think the bigger story here is related to how LinkedIn is a much more accurate source for peoples credentials, and the potential disruption of the recruitment industry.

2 years, 4 months ago on Scott Thompson Saga Continues: With Audio! | PandoDaily

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 @achshar @entrepreneurSF  According to the below story on "paidContent", Michael and Xochi Birch, Ron Conway, Michael Jackson, and Richard Hecker all invested money in Bebo six months after Criterion had bought it from AOL. Hence, the point of Paul's storey.

http://paidcontent.org/2012/04/24/beboownersued/

2 years, 4 months ago on The Bebo Lawsuit, and the Tragedy of Departed Founders Who Can’t Let Go

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Personally, I think the purchase of Sun was a great move by Oracle. It allows them to supply a full hardware/software stack, for which they can also sell support, and it also provided them with control over MySQL and the ability to create a product path from it to Oracle DB. Not to mention it also bought them control of one of the most used languages in Enterprise - Java.

 

Their mistake wasn't that they bought Sun. Their mistake was that they acted like dicks.

They filed against Google, and they tried to leverage against HP.

2 years, 5 months ago on Oracle Execs Thought Sun Acquisition Was A Mistake

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 @tweetbongs You have missed the whole point! The point is to encourage Twitter employees to create and file patents in the knowledge that they won't be used offensively in the future. Additionally the agreement intentionally limits the ability of later management to reneg on the deal. Given Sun's history a guess all of the Sun/Java patents were created and filed under the understanding that they would only be used defensively, BUT that only works so long as the people that had that understanding are in control of the company, hence Oracles lawsuit after buying Sun. This binds Twitter the company, and therefore any subsequent acquirers to keep this agreement. If, in the future, anyone suggests, "Hey let's sue megabrand X for patent infringement", the management will be able to say, "No. Our patent assignment agreement doesn't allow that."

 

I bet the original founders of Yahoo are wishing that they had implemented something like this - rather than see their company dragged through the mud.

 

PS Hyphen included just for Sarah.

2 years, 5 months ago on Was Today Twitter’s ‘Don’t Be Evil’ Moment?

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I think that basically the blog reading tech scene are fascinated by the whole AOL, TechCrunch, Arrington drama.

The ?rumor? that Arianna Huffington had been removed from overseeing TechCrunch caused a lot of people to openly wonder if this might lead to Michael Arrington's triumphant return (Steve Jobs style). Then Pando's announcement re Arrinton leaving the board poured more fuel on the fire.

If Pando made a mistake, it was not providing a reason in their announcement, even if it was reason like, "We felt it was unfair of us to expect Michael Arrington to remain active on the board given his many current commitments. We look forward to, and expect, a productive relationship with Arrington who remains an investor."

In other words, "AOL? TechCrunch? Arrington?, look we're not going to touch that with a ten foot pole!"

2 years, 5 months ago on Why Isn’t This News? ‘Owl’

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 @bleepy Agree completely. Since the invention of the telegram, newer technologies have always been used in favour of older technologies, but only where it makes most sense. Most communications do not need to be interactive, or one-to-one, hence the rise in popularity of SMS, tweets, and status updates. People will still make phone calls and people will still use Skype, however, when they do it is often either because the message/conversation is urgent, prearranged, or of a personal/sentimental nature (e.g. skyping grandchildren).

 

Skype needs to partner with others to focus on the prearranging of when Skype calls will occur and streamlining the call process, not worry about the popularity of orthogonal services.

 

Sidenote: I am rather amused by the ad. campaigns as I mainly use Skype for Instant Messaging, not calls, or video.

2 years, 5 months ago on Skype Takes a Dig at Social Networking, But Do They Have a Valid Point?

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 @AndyToulouse Dwight who? Were you replying to a comment that has been edited? I've searched the story, the link, and the comments, and I cannot find any reference to Dwight.

2 years, 5 months ago on The Dumbing Down of Silicon Valley

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