Livefyre Profile

Activity Stream

@jeremykovac1 You know that "app launcher" means very different things on Android and iOS, right?

11 months, 3 weeks ago on Aviate is a context-aware homescreen replacement meant to bring Android into the future

Reply

@Johnswilson1 Oh, I would've too! 

I see what you're saying, and Mike made the same point. But Staples must be popular (it claims to be the No. 2 online retailer in the US, and its brick-and-mortar stores are still in business, which counts for something) with some folks, and it's interesting that they believe those consumers will be so interested in the IoT.

1 year ago on Staples Connect offers consumers a taste of their connected futures

Reply

@Johnswilson1 It's almost like that's directly mentioned in the story!

1 year ago on Staples Connect offers consumers a taste of their connected futures

Reply

@distrbnce 

1. Funny, given your third point. And, just so you know, I prefer building Faraday cages from popsicle sticks and the bubblegum cores from Blow Pops. Much more effective.

2. I made a joke about that, actually! 

3. Access to Google's data is troubling. But it's hardly the only technology company that matters.

1 year ago on An imagined letter from the NSA to Tim Cook

Reply

@smartstephen Hahaha. I'm just glad I've decided to beat this particular drum over the last few months ;)

1 year ago on Nokia continues to lead Windows Phone to success — or something like it, anyway

Reply

@AssafLavie I wrote out a long-ish comment explaining why I'd use the service (it's free and can provide instructions to local key-makers, nixing some of the problems you mention of waiting for a mail-order key or finding a kiosk) and why I'm more likely to take a picture of my key than to create and keep track of duplicates ahead of time (my absentmindedness reigns supreme) as well as saying the equivalent to "different strokes for different folks" but Livefyre killed it so I'll just leave it at this.

1 year, 1 month ago on Losing your keys sucks. KeyMe makes it a little less painful

Reply

@dnovich -- @Zobtalkstech is right. Zuckerberg treated the newspaper bit as a metaphor, and I did the same. I'm not saying that Facebook will become a newspaper, I'm saying that it has grown to serve many of the functions that a small-town newspaper served in previous years. There's an important difference, I think.

1 year, 1 month ago on Facebook continues to make Zuckerberg’s newspaper metaphor a reality

Reply

@SteveAustin1 That is all an interesting, and totally valid, point. (Bonus points for using Markdown, assuming that's what your intention was, btw.) It's been raised before but I don't think there's been anything particularly insightful written on exactly why Amazon's gotten a pass. I'll have to look into it.

1 year, 2 months ago on Every ebook iOS Kindle app users buy will allow Amazon to slap Apple

Reply

@timrpeterson Again, I'm not seeing how app stores selling software in a certain way affects the frustration of entering billing and shipping info in online stores -- even if it's only once -- but, sure.

1 year, 2 months ago on Shopping on a smartphone sucks. Payvia (and everyone else) wants to fix it

Reply

Since I mentioned the mobile Web in this post, and this isn't applicable to many apps or the App Store -- which simply require the entry of a password confirming that you are the person whose credit card will be charged when the transaction closes -- your comment doesn't really make much sense.

1 year, 2 months ago on Shopping on a smartphone sucks. Payvia (and everyone else) wants to fix it

Reply

@FrederickTubiermont I have used Mozilla's desktop demo, but have not yet gotten my hands on a unit. I've been hearing critical things from people developing for the operating system or using the launch devices, but I wanted to focus first on Mozilla's mission -- after I've used a device, spoken with more people, and gotten responses from the company I'll feel comfortable commenting on how well it's doing. 

1 year, 2 months ago on Firefox OS can’t compete with Android and iOS, and that’s okay

Reply

@ChuckTwat You're really living up to the second part of your username with that comment.

1 year, 2 months ago on How one middle-America surgery center uses online price transparency to disrupt the medical industry

Reply

@bgoldberg "Everyone on Kickstarter needs to assume that they are making a very small-scale donation to an entreprenuer. Whether they get their watch or bike or what not is a cherry on the cake. They will usually get *something*, but they should keep their expectations in check. " Agreed -- but making that clear to backers has been something that crowdfunding platforms and the companies that use them, whether it's for funding, marketing, or distribution, have been struggling with for a while, as I noted.

"It's hard for me to be sympathetic about some random guy losing $75, when a lot of angel investors lose $75,000 on similar companies — often for reasons even more frustrating than a manufacturing snafu. The dynamics of risk and reward are not reserved for the very wealthy. It's a boat in which every single person finds themselves." So, wait. Because some people who happen to be fond of investing their money in startups can (do) lose big, it means that people who expected something in return for their dollar, of which they have far fewer than any angel investor worth their salt, shouldn't matter? "Rich people lose money, so it doesn't matter if poor people lose their money too" is an odd stance to take.

"This article — which I consider to be uncontroversial to the extreme —"  It wasn't meant to be controversial; why is that a requirement for, well, anything?

"appears to have been prompted by "one reporter" at a press conference. Do you have a link?""

It was prompted by a specific question, months of following trends in crowdfunding and the way it is perceived by the companies working in the space, using the platforms, and a specific line of questioning asked about a specific product. As soon as they figure out a way to link to things said during phone calls I'll get right on that for you.


1 year, 3 months ago on Which is worse for crowdfunders, naiveté or honesty?

Reply

@TomValentine @nathanielmott I know. I thought it'd be funnier to reply like that than to say "I don't think that this article was being mean to a person, as it doesn't mention anything about his personal life, and instead focuses on things that happened at Microsoft and Zynga, douchey corporate double-speak, and the comedy of someone leaving one company after having many of his plans or ideas reversed to join a company that already succeeded at making many of those ideas a reality, at least in some ways."

1 year, 3 months ago on A (totally legitimate) letter from new Zynga CEO Don Mattrick

Reply

@TomValentine SAYING THAT IN ALL-CAPS IS COUNTER-PRODUCTIVE.

1 year, 3 months ago on A (totally legitimate) letter from new Zynga CEO Don Mattrick

Reply

@jonathanross What does Apple "coupling" the service with its beta product have to do with Bing not being an "also-ran" or "mostly adequate" search engine?

Oh, and as for my use of "also-ran": The search engine has less than 20 percent of search engine marketshare. (Its results power more than that, but the people knowingly using Bing and getting its results weren't the focus there.) That's an also-ran. And "mostly adequate" -- by the way, I said "perfectly adequate," not "mostly adequate," but whatever -- is better than many other engines' results; but they aren't as good as Google's, which is something people have been saying since, ya know, Bing was released, so there's that.

I'm well aware of what those words (they're terms, by the way, but we'll let that one go too) mean. 

1 year, 3 months ago on Bing me up, Ballmer: An also-ran search engine is changing the Xbox, Windows, and Microsoft

Reply

@dawizard "This post is sponsored by Vine and Vine fanboys..." 

Want to jump straight to that one, huh? I guess that's as good a way to jump into a comment as any.

"I don't understand the hate (albeit a strong term) for a product which was rolled out literally hours ago and is probably not firing on all cylinders just yet  (i.e. buggy) but have you seen the junk that gets published on Vine? Apparently there is a lot of crap on Vine too, without filters etc, it'll be everywhere, any new tools or existing tool."

I don't recall saying that there are no bad Vines. And there's a difference between "hate" and "criticism." And the whole "literally rolled out hours ago" bit is irrelevant. This isn't a beta, it's not going out to a limited number of users, it's a major product addition that everyone who updates Instagram to version 4.0 will be exposed to. 

"And to call it a tool for communication and Instagram a vanity piece is starting to sound like an Apple vs MS debate where MS (Instagram) has added a lot more features/frills but Apple fanboys love the simplicity and will never like Instagram. "

You realize that 'Apple fanboys' were Instagram's only users for a long time, right? They're the people who made the service popular in the first place. And, ugh, 'fanboys' twice in one comment? Come on.

"Disclaimer - I don't use either. I am a consumer of Vines though through Twitterati. Give it some time, I think instagram will settledown. Give it some time and then bring out the pitchforks."

Okay, so this doesn't really affect you either way, then. Got it. 


1 year, 3 months ago on Narcissism in motion: Instagram’s new video features are a vanity mirror, not a communications tool

Reply

Man, them are some sexy photos.

1 year, 3 months ago on Is Mark Zuckerberg the new Bill Gates?

Reply

@jholyhead So, because appliances and other objects are becoming smarter, that means that improvements can't be made to electrical outlets? It doesn't have to be a zero-sum game.

1 year, 3 months ago on Plug ‘em in: Let’s make electrical outlets a little smarter

Reply

@markrogo It's definitely been an odd year. And there's still much of 2013 before either console is introduced -- I can't even imagine what might change in that time.

And thank you!

1 year, 3 months ago on From jester to savior: How the Xbox One turned the PlayStation 4 into the white knight of console gaming

Reply

@webjoe I had a similar thought earlier. More on that later. :)

1 year, 3 months ago on The more laptops change, the more the MacBook Air stays the same

Reply

@prepend I would actually reframe your question -- why is it that none of Apple's competitors have produced something that approaches the MacBook Air's quality while matching its price? Some have produced cheaper products. Others have produced devices with more features, but with a higher price. Apple has found the sweet spot where it is able to offer (as I wrote) a "good enough" product that, as the comments below have outlined (and I believe you were getting at as well) is exactly what most people want and can afford.

I suspect that the answer is Tim Cook and Apple's now-legendary supply chains, but I'm not sure that accounts for everything. It's a perplexing question that I hope we see resolved at some point.

1 year, 3 months ago on The more laptops change, the more the MacBook Air stays the same

Reply

@Joshhua It is publicly available to developers (but wasn't at the time of writing). I'll see if I can upload it and add somewhere.

1 year, 3 months ago on Apple had a hit with iOS — and that’s why it had to rebuild it

Reply

@LidiaKaThis has nothing to do with Fitbit or any of the other companies you mentioned. And I certainly never used the word "fake," as that'd be a pretty stupid thing to call a bunch of companies that have already built products people can buy and use. You say you "read up and down very carefully" but it doesn't seem that way, which is why I'll go ahead and break it down:

"It’s becoming easier and easier for software companies to dabble in hardware... The line between software and hardware startups has dissolved alongside the boundaries between our physical and digital worlds — now the only question is whether or not these companies will continue to embrace hardware, or if physical goods are simply a stop-gap between our barely-connected present and our hyper-connected future." It is very clearly about software-focused startups creating their own hardware (as opposed to hardware-centric companies) from the beginning. The distinction is important.

I then cite three companies that are currently or have previously used hardware as a selling point -- Spark Devices, Ninja Blocks, and SmartThings -- and then quoted from a colleague's (excellent) report on one and from one of my numerous interviews with Alex Hawkinson directly afterward. Again, this is very clearly about software makers, and has gone one step further down: Connected device makers that have used or are using hardware but are now focusing or will focus on the software side of the service.

"Connected devices are currently hacked-together affairs that force Web-based features onto mundane objects. Devices like the SmartThings hub or the Ninja Block bridge the physical and digital worlds, sure, but the “smart” devices they power will eventually be sold with their own sensors and connected hardware — the current incarnations are largely stop-gaps and proofs of concept that demonstrate how truly smart devices might work. Then, once these connected devices really catch on, it will fall upon these startups to bring ‘em all together and build something more than a cuckoo clock that responds to tweets." Notice, again, that I specifically mention connected device makers that have begun to shift focus from their own hardware to their own software. And then see how I incorporate the headline (in case that could have caused confusion) right in the same paragraph and then explained why -- "the “smart” devices they power will eventually be sold with their own sensors and connected hardware" -- this is.

And then, as if that isn't it enough, this is what I wrote *right before* the paragraph I quoted above:

"That isn’t to say that hardware isn’t an important aspect of the Internet of Things. (An Internet of Things without things is just the Internet, after all.) Even those who decided to forgo hardware and focus entirely on the software side of our connected future cite hardware products as the impetus for the rise of Internet-capable devices.

"'As mobile phones led the charge to get people unglued from their laptops and unglued to their desktops and out walking around — albeit still looking down at their smartphone — it opened people up to the idea that computers aren’t just something in your living room or your office,” says IFTTT’s Lindin Tibbets.  ”They’re literally going to be a piece of everything.'” And, as more and more companies try to sell us connected appliances and furniture and whatevers, it will fall on software startups to, well, connect them all."

So I noted -- and quoted! -- to say that even people who aren't working on the software aspect of the Internet of Things rely on some form of hardware! Of course it can't just be about the software, this isn't the freakin' matrix. But for these startups trying to connect everyday objects to the Internet via their own after-market hardware, it's important to note that, eventually, if the Internet of Things is to go mainstream, those very same sensors and Internet capabilities will be built into these objects by the same companies that have been making them for decades.  Hardware is, for them, a stop-gap or proof-of-concept that will service the companies and their customers until they no longer need to be hacked together.


1 year, 3 months ago on Hardware is a stop-gap on the way to a hyper-connected future

Reply

@Takeshi Young The way I understand it is that there are ways (visiting a website, for example) to prevent this from happening. And I believe that these systems can be turned off, which would also render the problem moot. But, beyond that, if someone has taken your phone and is really intent on doing some harm with it, do you think they would just give up if they came across a locked front door? I imagine they would enter through more nefarious methods no matter what these companies do.

1 year, 3 months ago on The Internet of the Mundane: Smart locks, connected lightbulbs, and learning thermostats

Reply

@KenG Holographic displays would be amazing, and not just for product demos. Unfortunately it seems like we're far away from those becoming a thing, let alone becoming mainstream.

Good point, with the refurb bit. I wonder if they might be able to do something similar to WP, which is setting aside a certain number of devices specifically for try-before-you-buy purposes? Connected devices are still very much niche products, and I don't think it would be too horrible for companies to create a few units for testing purposes. As connected devices become more popular that might start to be an issue, but there may also be a way to make it scale.

You make good points, though. Thanks for sharing your view on the subject, I'm sure others had considered the refurb bit as well and didn't voice their concerns.

1 year, 4 months ago on To sell connected devices, retailers should emulate Warby Parker

Reply

@jholyhead That's one way to look at it, sure.

1 year, 4 months ago on Helpshift promises to help developers avoid one-star reviews

Reply

@impm I am glad that you typically like my stuff, and sorry that you feel that way about this post. I rarely get particularly excited about a new service or application -- especially one in the photo-sharing space -- but when I do I'm going to tell people why, and this happened to be one of those times. (It also seemed a good follow-up from yesterday's bit about Instagram and Path.)

I appreciate your feedback, though. Thank you for letting me know how you feel -- and for being courteous about it.

1 year, 4 months ago on Analog Camera makes photos fun again

Reply

@JoeDiNardo Lately it seems that its primary function is as a central distributor for facepalms.

1 year, 4 months ago on The Facebook-ification of Path and Instagram is at least partly our fault

Reply

@Encaitar @MartinWawrusch @drewmeyers I will pass that along to the appropriate people. In the meantime, I believe that the video is available on our YouTube page. That should work a bit better for you all.

1 year, 4 months ago on PandoMonthly San Francisco with KPCB’s John Doerr, the full interview

Reply

@CharlesW I helped raise my nephew (who had severe diaper problems) on-and-off between his first and fourth birthdays but, no, I do not have kids. 

And really? You think that Tweeting -- broadcasting -- someone's bodily functions is the best solution? How about a push notification or, as the (fake) product suggested, SMS? There's a difference between notifying someone that their kid has taken a piss and broadcasting that information.

1 year, 4 months ago on Twitter: Enabling the Internet of Things-lite

Reply

@AlexanderJWilkas Wrong on both counts, actually. But that seems to be the default position taken with any remotely critical article (this post was an indictment of the Lumia line and was only tangentially related to Windows Phone itself) so, hey, think what you like.

1 year, 4 months ago on The future of Nokia is Asha, not Lumia

Reply

@GamerJunkdotNet Yep: "The iPhone hasn’t been exclusive to any one carrier since the iPhone 4 came to Verizon in 2011. Now the device is available from T-Mobile, Walmart, AT&T, Sprint, Verizon, and prepaid carriers. Unlike other smartphones, many of which prominently display the Verizon logo or are exclusive to the carrier in some way, the iPhone is the iPhone, no matter who you buy it from."

1 year, 4 months ago on Verizon doesn’t care about BlackBerry or Windows Phone — it just wants to beat the iPhone

Reply

@alfonzso That's what I was getting at! It's not about Safari or Mail.app sucking, even though that's how the argument is usually framed -- it's about being able to choose.

1 year, 4 months ago on Let geeks choose their own ice cream

Reply

@DNIDK That's been my (limited) experience as well, setting up PCs for my fiancee's younger siblings. No issues understanding the OS or its design. I actually greatly prefer it to traditional Windows and (maybe) OS X.

1 year, 4 months ago on Windows 8 is killing PCs. It’s also one of the fastest-selling operating systems in history

Reply

@Lucas Rayala @cooldoods The bit Lucas points out is spot-on. I chose the term "modern smartphone" very carefully -- I am aware that there were pre-iPhone smartphones, but it is commonly accepted (and my own opinion) that the iPhone started the *modern* smartphone trend.

1 year, 4 months ago on How the iPhone and its “tick-tock” release cycle made consumers care about software

Reply

@AssafLavie Sure thing. From the IDC's report:

"Microsoft, which is a focal point for many in the tablet space, entered the top five for the first time as shipments of its Surface RT and Surface Pro tablets combined for a total of nearly 900,000 units. [...] Beyond the Surface products, Windows 8 and Windows RT tablets continued to struggle to gain traction in the market. Total combined Windows 8 and Windows RT shipments across all vendors reached 1.8 million units."

So, if Microsoft sold 0.9 million Surface tablets (which, obvs, run Windows 8) and 1.8 million Windows tablets were sold, that means that alllllll the other manufacturers sold 0.9 million tablets as well. So, half.

1 year, 5 months ago on Four takeaways from the IDC’s tablet market report

Reply

@ubut Ah, I was wondering when the crazies -- er, the faithful -- would show up.

1 year, 5 months ago on Why BlackBerry CEO Thorsten Heins is both right and wrong about tablets

Reply

@abbu @nathanielmott We'll see how those things work out. Certainly an exciting time to be using (and writing about) technology.

1 year, 5 months ago on Why BlackBerry CEO Thorsten Heins is both right and wrong about tablets

Reply

@crucible Thank you for catching the error -- I mistyped and didn't catch it later on. It's been corrected.

1 year, 5 months ago on Why BlackBerry CEO Thorsten Heins is both right and wrong about tablets

Reply

@abbu Oh, and note that i said that thinking that people will not be using tablets is like Ballmer dismissing the iPhone back in '07. 

1 year, 5 months ago on Why BlackBerry CEO Thorsten Heins is both right and wrong about tablets

Reply

@abbu Two things, in regards to BlackBerry going into the smartphone market:

1. You're absolutely right that it made little sense for them to launch a smartphone. It doesn't make much sense for the guys at Jolla to be developing Sailfish, or for Canonical to bring Ubuntu to phones and tablets, either. But they believe that they can make a dent -- evidence to the contrary be damned -- and so continue to introduce new products.

2. As irritating as it is, BlackBerry is just about the only handset maker shipping a QWERTY smartphone in 2013. (Or the only one that matters, anyway.) So, that is enough to differentiate it for now -- whether or not that will be the case in the future remains to be seen.

1 year, 5 months ago on Why BlackBerry CEO Thorsten Heins is both right and wrong about tablets

Reply

@elicolner @nathanielmott Ah, gotcha. I can certainly see that; Morin has been pretty tenacious in his efforts to make Path as big as he believes it can be.

1 year, 5 months ago on Apple continues to “think different” — it’s just that “different” is, well, different

Reply

@Leon Falk Both of the things you took issue with, the introduction of the iPad and the "ceded the battle" note, were included as a point-counterpoint structure. Those are not my views, which is why I shot them down in the following sentences and paragraphs, depending.

This is largely about two things: how Apple is viewed, and what Apple is. The beginning part (point) is a view; that's why they're linked. The second part (counterpoint) is how things really are, and in many cases are also linked. 

Hopefully that makes a bit more sense. I'm certainly not among the "marketshare versus profit" or "Apple needs to release something new!" crowd ;)

1 year, 5 months ago on Apple continues to “think different” — it’s just that “different” is, well, different

Reply

@timrpeterson That's odd -- I've used it a bit and haven't encountered any problems. I'm able to edit documents, they auto-save, and formatting works properly. 

1 year, 5 months ago on Fidus Writer is a collaborative writing tool custom-built for academia

Reply

@rhytrr "Anvil, an ecommerce company billing its Pack Store as the 'cure for the Kickstarter hangover' and the 'App Store for hardware.' Anvil is betting that hardware makers and consumers want a one-stop shop that anyone can sell through."

Which part of that is unclear?

1 year, 5 months ago on Anvil seeks to cure the “Kickstarter hangover” by becoming a one-stop shop for connected devices

Reply

@LaVonneReimer Glad to hear that you enjoyed it :)

1 year, 5 months ago on Manual Retweeting, misguided thumbkissing, and other social media sins

Reply