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Although the one in your picture did have a bit of a habit of calling them "stupid apes." :P


1 hour, 42 minutes ago on Capaldi’s Doctor More Alien, Less “human-friendly”

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I agree to an extent; with Ten, I see a constant battle in his head between the humanity that he wants to have and the, not alien-ness in general, but the specific Time Lord-iness that he can't escape. In Series 2, he laments being forced to bear the "curse of the Time Lords", and attempts to have a very human relationship with Rose. But when she's taken from him, it hurts him because he's opened up his human side, and so to desensitize himself to that somewhat, he begins to take refuge in his Time Lord mind, and his internal conflict gets worse and worse until it culminates in the "Time Lord Victorious" and of course his breakdown in "The End of Time".


1 hour, 36 minutes ago on Capaldi’s Doctor More Alien, Less “human-friendly”

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He doesn't just mention the bow-tie here (he also refers to the scarf), and he even said in the other interview that he liked the last three years of the show. He just wants to do his own thing, I think. He wants the Doctor to be his Doctor now, to be judged on his own merits.


5 hours, 58 minutes ago on Capaldi’s Doctor More Alien, Less “human-friendly”

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I would say that "The Lodger" did indeed go overboard with it (though it was still very funny), but "Closing Time" was a lot more reasonable. Actually, I've always regarded that episode as a very strong example of the Eleventh Doctor's characterization.


5 hours, 46 minutes ago on Capaldi’s Doctor More Alien, Less “human-friendly”

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I agree. There is an appealing sense of symmetry (finally completing that hat-trick of deaths) in the idea of Clara, the true Clara, making one final sacrifice for the Doctor, because she's done so throughout time for all her lives, and so of course she would still do it if deadly circumstances arose. It's in her nature to sacrifice herself or her desires for the sake of others, just as she did for the Maitland kids by giving up her dreams of traveling in order to care for them. I read one particularly devious idea that somebody presented elsewhere which suggested that Clara could sacrifice herself in a way that causes the Doctor to forget all about her, and before doing it, she could say to the Doctor, "Run you clever boy, and forget me." It could partially explain why he never noticed her throughout his life, and it would probably leave me in an emotionally-compromised catatonic state for at least a week, and it would be glorious.


7 hours, 19 minutes ago on What Actually Makes a Story Dark?

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Jenny, I'll definitely give you. However, I heavily disagree with Clara. She's like River, in that we see her lives out of sequence. Just because we see how she began later on does not mean that the two echoes that we saw die ever came back. The fact that you meet modern Clara later on doesn't change the reality that Victorian Clara and Dalek Oswin are doornailed. Their deaths; their sacrifices still have meaning. And on the other hand, Charcoal Clara was just an poorly-elaborated alternative future, and since "our" Clara was never made to become her, we cannot say that she was ever "brought back" from that death. And the thing about Rory is, he doesn't actually die all that much. He's died more than most normally would, definitely, but still not that many times - once in Series 5 (which was an important plot point), and twice in Series 7 (in the same episode, which happened to be his last and was also an important plot point). "Amy's Choice" was a dream, "The Curse of the Black Spot" was a near-death (which technically speaking, we've seen almost every week for forever), and "The Doctor's Wife" was just a hologram projection that certainly nobody in the audience would have expected to be legitimate. But the three that were important to the plot, and were actual deaths, did matter, if not emotionally after the fact (though I would contest that assertion, especially in the case of Series 5 since it leads to Rory's 2,000 years which was major character development for him), then at least in terms of narrative progression. And I'm struggling to think of what Amy's instances of resurrection were. The only thing that comes to mind is "The Girl Who Waited", but that, like Charcoal Clara, was an alternative future.


7 hours, 30 minutes ago on What Actually Makes a Story Dark?

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Just out of curiosity, what sort of consequence is killing a random trader supposed to yield, exactly? Solomon wasn't a particularly reputed or even important individual in the wider scheme of things. Me, I always saw the Doctor murdering Solomon as a consequence in and of itself of the Doctor spending too much time alone. It, as well as holding Kahler-Jex at gunpoint in the following episode, serves to show us that little extra step into darkness that the Doctor is willing to take without somebody around to keep him grounded and focused. At least, that's the meaning that I took from it.


14 hours, 20 minutes ago on What Actually Makes a Story Dark?

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"The erased parts of the universe were reversed by a big, friendly button" -Not true. Everything that was erased is still erased, save the Doctor and Amy's parents because she specifically remembered them back into existence.  |  "the Silents turned out to not actually want to control anyone and be priests" -That only applies to the group from which they originated. The splinter faction Silents always intended to manipulate humans into working for them, because they broke away from the main group and took to extremism.  |  "In fact, if you're strong-willed enough, you don't even age!" -Only if you take that line at face value. I just assumed that humans in that century had anti-aging technology. Well, they have time-travel, so why not?


14 hours, 34 minutes ago on What Actually Makes a Story Dark?

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Quite; "The End of Time" showed us one of the bigger tragedies of the Time War, that the ruling class of Time Lords had become so far gone (or perhaps they were merely strongarmed into following Rassilon's omnicidal lead through fearmongering; I don't know, I would say that it's open to interpretation) that they were no better than the Daleks in the end (as highlighted by Rassilon's final words being the same as the Dalek Emperor's in "The Parting of the Ways" - that was excellent parallelism/bookending on RTD's part). Ultimately, I think that we needed to see both sides of it. We needed to see what the Time Lords became, and who would have had to have payed the price in order to stop them had the Doctor been unable to save himself.


20 hours, 1 minute ago on What Actually Makes a Story Dark?

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Oh, I know. I understand the ideas at work, but I'm just saying that, coming right off of "The Waters of Mars", I didn't think that it was a particularly satisfying follow-up. That said, however, I love "The Waters of Mars" and like "The End of Time" well enough. I just find the transition between the two to be a bit, "Oh, is that the route they're taking with this? Well, okay, I guess I'll roll with it, but I was expecting something a bit more." 


20 hours, 32 minutes ago on What Actually Makes a Story Dark?

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You know, after reading this comment, it occurs to me just how many bodies got dropped (or worse, desecrated by the Angels in order to mock/toy with the Doctor) in the Series 5 Angel two-parter. And "The Angels Take Manhattan", whatever you may think of the resolution or the Liberty statue, had the human battery farm, which was quite a brutal and terrifying concept if you ask me.


20 hours, 41 minutes ago on What Actually Makes a Story Dark?

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"My Silence", as I believe it's called, is a good, somber one, too. And, in the case of "The Life and Death of Amy Pond" and "Remember Me", I don't even think it matters that they have a "fairy tale" tone to them - they're used extremely effectively in not-at-all light or tension-less situations (specifically, the end of reality and Clara stepping into the timestream to sacrifice herself, respectively). EDIT: Actually, thinking about it "The Name of the Doctor" had several pieces that were quite dark, serious, solemn, or funereal.


20 hours, 52 minutes ago on What Actually Makes a Story Dark?

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*echoes supermoff* This is a very thought-provoking and analytical article. Great job.


23 hours, 2 minutes ago on What Actually Makes a Story Dark?

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I do want to say, though, that there is such a thing as "too much" darkness/death. When it serves no purpose other than to contrive a sense of "tragedy" or "consequence", or to simply be "edgy," it becomes gratuitous. I can't exactly pinpoint the exact difference myself, as it's subtle and most likely very subjective, but as I see it, this is the difference between meaningfully death-heavy or grim episodes like "The Caves of Androzani" and "The God Complex", and pointlessly death-heavy or grim episodes such as "Voyage of the Damned" and perhaps the most egregious example in my opinion, "The Almost People" (standing there holding the door shut for a whole three-minute conversation when they could be, oh, I don't know, getting into the TARDIS). And I think it helps when bleaker episodes still retain a sense of adventure, like in "Utopia", which I think strikes a perfect balance between the two.

21 hours, 11 minutes ago on What Actually Makes a Story Dark?

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"The Empty Child/The Doctor Dances is by far the scariest story to date, and it didn't kill anyone!" -That is true, although I would argue that the poignancy of that story is in the fact that it's set during World War II, and that the "everybody lives" resolution, while brilliantly cathartic for the Ninth Doctor as a character, is ultimately made futile by the fact that it is achieved in a midst of a war zone, wherein the next day will be probably just as gruesome and macabre as the many that came before.


21 hours, 4 minutes ago on What Actually Makes a Story Dark?

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In the case of "The Waters of Mars", I would say that it isn't the ending of that episode that lets it down (far from it, in fact), but rather that it is the beginning of the next episode that does it a disservice. We go from a visibly shaken and desperate Tenth Doctor who has truly begun to go mad with power, to... him strutting around casually in a straw hat and a lei, locking the TARDIS like a car for giggles. o.O


21 hours, 1 minute ago on What Actually Makes a Story Dark?

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And while the Time War was never portrayed as a simple or a light issue in the RTD era, "The Day of the Doctor" was the first to say, "Hey, he's about to slaughter billions of kids." Not that we couldn't have inferred that before, but "Day" brought that aspect of it to the forefront and confronted it head-on.


23 hours, 8 minutes ago on What Actually Makes a Story Dark?

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"Well, Matt was never a dark Doctor himself" -True, I suppose, although I always got the impression that his youthful, hyperactive, and "fun" behavior was a form of compensation for the incredibly ancient and traumatized old man inside. His speech to Alfie in "Closing Time" and his speech to Amy in one of the "Meanwhile in the TARDIS" minisodes are good examples of when you can just start to see the facade start to drop.


23 hours, 3 minutes ago on What Actually Makes a Story Dark?

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It was a short-but-sweet moment, but I did like that they addressed the fact that the Doctor would basically be killing all of the people who had been trapped in the cloud and had no living bodies left to return to.


23 hours, 33 minutes ago on What Actually Makes a Story Dark?

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I'll have to work without line breaks here, but: Bells 8/10, Rings 6/10, Cold War 7/10, Hide 7.5/10, Journey 6.5/10, Crimson 8.5/10, Nightmare 6/10. Overall, I really enjoyed the series, though it had its flaws.


1 day, 1 hour ago on New Who: The Story Thus Far – Series 7 (Part 2)

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Oh no. How ever could we survive such a torturous fate.


1 day, 14 hours ago on Capaldi was Adamant About No Flirting in Series 8

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"Consistent" is not the word that I would use to describe Series 6, and I like Series 6. Frankly, I felt as though it had to be stretched too far in order to meet the standard thirteen-episode format. "Black Spot" was filler. The Flesh story could have been a one-parter. "Night Terrors" was filler. And none of those stories were particularly good, in my opinion, so the overall quality ended up looking very "Swiss cheesey." "The Girl Who Waited" was beautiful, but it was beautiful filler nonetheless, as was "The Doctor's Wife". Series 6 was the kind of story that needed to be a tight-knit, "no pit stops" affair. Miracle Day's format probably would have worked wonders for Series 6, being a solid, ten-episode arc with lots of exposition.


1 day, 18 hours ago on New Who: The Story Thus Far – Series 7 (Part 2)

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And surely a society that lives on a series of asteroids would have developed atmospheric shielding?


1 day, 18 hours ago on New Who: The Story Thus Far – Series 7 (Part 2)

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"Oh, and the Cybermen can move at very fast speeds when they want to, which was only once. Why didn't they do that at all in the rest of the episode?" -There could be a number of reasons for this. To name two, perhaps that Cyberman was a specific model meant for speed, or perhaps that function is a big drain on their power that isn't optimal except in certain situations.


1 day, 19 hours ago on New Who: The Story Thus Far – Series 7 (Part 2)

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Unfortunately, lazy generalizations and the blatant disregard for facts and statistics are not.


1 day, 21 hours ago on Capaldi was Adamant About No Flirting in Series 8

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“Critics who treat 'adult' as a term of approval, instead of as a merely descriptive term, cannot be adult themselves. To be concerned about being grown up, to admire the grown up because it is grown up, to blush at the suspicion of being childish; these things are the marks of childhood and adolescence. And in childhood and adolescence they are, in moderation, healthy symptoms. Young things ought to want to grow. But to carry on into middle life or even into early manhood this concern about being adult is a mark of really arrested development. When I was ten, I read fairy tales in secret and would have been ashamed if I had been found doing so. Now that I am fifty I read them openly. When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up.” -C.S. Lewis, preachin'


1 day, 22 hours ago on Capaldi was Adamant About No Flirting in Series 8

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Moffat himself is a lifelong fan.


1 day, 22 hours ago on Capaldi was Adamant About No Flirting in Series 8

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Nah. Admittedly, I do tend to enjoy the more humany Doctors less, because I'm not all that big on Five either. However, the vanity is certainly no issue; Six was incredibly egotistical and he's one of my favorites. Ten just isn't very interesting to me. He's bland, right down to the costume. He comes off as "just a bloke" to me, with nothing eccentric about him, and personally, I believe that the Doctor needs eccentricity. Ten's quirky, I suppose, but he's so "modern day guy" that he seems unremarkable. It's nothing against David, though. The problem wasn't in his acting. I just don't think that he was a very compellingly-written character. Plenty of others disagree, of course, and that's fine.


2 days, 22 hours ago on Why I Love the 11th Doctor’s Regeneration

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Dalek and Doomsday and The Sound of Drums and The End of Time and The Doctor's Wife disagree with your assertion. "Let's Kill Hitler" does not suggest that the Doctor does not remember his time as the War Doctor. I think I know which quote you're referring to, but let's look at that for a second. He says, "So, basically better regenerate, that's what you're saying." To which the interface responds, "Regeneration disabled. You will be dead in thirty two minutes." He isn't saying that he can regenerate. He is presuming that the interface is going to tell him to regenerate. How do we know that, had the interface not shot down his assumption, that he wouldn't have said, "Yeah, well, I'm all out of regenerations, so what should I do about that?" or something to that effect? We don't. Moreover, he was in a panic at that time. How often do people think straight when they're in a crisis and are about to die?


2 days, 2 hours ago on Why I Love the 11th Doctor’s Regeneration

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It's a coincidence (twelve episodes worked better for the filming schedule), but a fun one.


2 days, 2 hours ago on Why I Love the 11th Doctor’s Regeneration

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What I get from it is more, "that way was fine, but I want to do my own thing." Which is how it should be, of course. Twelve shouldn't be an extension of Eleven with gray hair.


2 days, 2 hours ago on Capaldi was Adamant About No Flirting in Series 8

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Erm... no.


2 days, 15 hours ago on Why I Love the 11th Doctor’s Regeneration

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Didn't Nine send the vortex energy back into the TARDIS, though?


2 days, 22 hours ago on Why I Love the 11th Doctor’s Regeneration

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Since we also seem to be voicing our opinions on the Tenth Doctor's regeneration, here goes: I thought that his made perfect sense for his incarnation. The Tenth Doctor was probably the most humany incarnation of them all. After he lost Rose, he slowly shielded himself from the pain of it by displaying more of his Time Lord persona. "The End of Time" is meant to break that facade down completely, similarly to how "The Time of the Doctor" strips away Eleven's youthful exterior and reveals the tired old man underneath. Plus, he was occasionally quite vain. So going out of his way to get a "reward" (I initially didn't like the idea that he went back and looked up *all* of his companions as established in "Death of the Doctor", but knowing now that it would have been his last regeneration, it actually makes quite a bit of sense as opposed to him just being overly dramatic, and the case with Jo Grant made it clear that he could only look some of them up, not visit them in person), and lamenting to himself about not wanting to go (though in his defense - Ten only lived for three to six years, so when he says he could do "so much more," he's not entirely wrong - as, being a humany incarnation, he would have an exaggerated sense of self in relation to the collective of "the Doctor"). Now, did I like Ten's regeneration? Eh... it doesn't really resonate with me personally, since Ten is one of my least-favorite incarnations. But it did make narrative sense, and that's something that I do like about it. In fact, I can't really think of a regeneration that's happened thus far that didn't make sense for that character (well, maybe Six's, but he had a notoriously massive ego so a random blow to the head being what kills him has the same touch of dramatic irony as the Seventh Doctor's regeneration). The episode itself was okay. I don't think that's it's one of the worst things to ever come out of the show like some do, but I don't love it. I love parts of it, like Wilfred and the Master and Rassilon, but other parts are pretty blargh (the Vinvocci, the Naismiths, some of the comedy fails to connect with me). And some of the farewells at the end could have been way better (Sarah Jane's in particular).

3 days, 1 hour ago on Why I Love the 11th Doctor’s Regeneration

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"though the society didn't advance at all" -Considering that they were a human colony on an alien world, it would seem that human society had already advanced by that point. I just assume that the humans on Trenzalore were like a Luddite or an Amish colony who came there to farm. They didn't want to advance, although it would have been hard to anyway since they were right in the center of a massive war for a lot of it.


3 days, 1 hour ago on Why I Love the 11th Doctor’s Regeneration

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"Couldn't they just come through an check that it was safe, then go back if it wasn't?" -Since they didn't do that, then it would seem not. Which makes sense; there's at least one precedent for the cracks in time snapping shut after somebody crossed through them (the fish vampires). And as for the name, what Clara said to them had to be true (that the Doctor was in dire need of their help), as she was standing in a truth field, and the Time Lords then couldn't afford to not lend their assistance because otherwise they would be stuck with nobody to help them.


3 days, 2 hours ago on Why I Love the 11th Doctor’s Regeneration

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That'd be my only criticism of "Caves". :P


3 days, 2 hours ago on Why I Love the 11th Doctor’s Regeneration

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Well, for one thing, I wouldn't have had Amy there. I really don't think that the nostalgic hallucinations work if the regenerating Time Lord is standing upright and giving a speech. It's trying to do two things at once, and it seemed a bit messy, to me. Here the Doctor is, trying to reassure himself and Clara about the imminent change, but oh wait, he's thinking about some other woman, let me turn over here and pay attention to her. I get what they were trying to do with the whole "first face this face saw" thing (Does this mean that McGann in "Night" was dreaming about the obese orderly from the TVM????? There are questions that need answers, here!), but after the heavy emphasis that the episode put on the relationship between the Doctor and Clara, it seems a jarring, contradictory disservice to shunt her off to the side like that. So ideally, there would have been no hallucination. Just a short speech to Clara, with the Doctor on the ground, weakened, as opposed to standing up. The standing-up speech kind of broke my suspension of disbelief, because it started to feel more like Matt Smith was talking instead of the Doctor, to the point where I half-expected him to walk off-stage and then on Capaldi comes to replace him. It didn't feel like a character was dying of old age, to me. It felt like an actor handing over a role, being able to stand up straight and give a parting soliloquy. So for me it would have been an on-the-ground, hallucination-free, small-speech regeneration. I'm *okay* with what we got, but in my personal opinion, it could have been a lot better. Although I did like that, for once, Eleven managed to use a straightforward metaphor that neatly captured the essence of the situation ("Everything you are, gone in a moment, like breath on a mirror...") as opposed to the rambling, nonsensical Metaphorgottens that he was known for. That was a great contrast. Definitely would have kept that in.


3 days, 17 hours ago on Why I Love the 11th Doctor’s Regeneration

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Plus, until now we had never seen how exactly a regeneration into a second cycle functioned, so there was some inherent creative leeway.


3 days, 18 hours ago on Why I Love the 11th Doctor’s Regeneration

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I can if his intentions were obvious. He had just headbutted Craig and transferred his "general background." The Doctor was specifying it for him in order to make it clearer. Learning that your new flat mate is a time-traveling, face-changing alien who lives in a giant ship in a police box is a lot of non-specific, contextless information to take in at once. There's really no reason to assume that the Doctor is introducing himself personally there, since he had already introduced himself as "the Doctor" in the beginning of the episode, and had just given Craig the gist of who he is.


3 days, 18 hours ago on Moffat Questions “Twelfth Doctor” Title

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It was reaffirmed by the Master in the same movie. The Doctor didn't just make it up; the Master acknowledged it to be true.


3 days, 18 hours ago on Moffat Questions “Twelfth Doctor” Title

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Furthermore, in the previous instance, he was asking a genuine question toward the readers of DWM. He asked, "when did the producers stop hedging their bets and out the Doctor as an alien?" He was presupposing that the producers had done so, but was prompting the readers to think about how long it took the producers to finally settle on that decision, because the show had a fair case of Early-Installment Weirdness when it came to that subject. Several people understood that. However, far too many did not and went on to quote "Rose" in his face, thinking that Moffat had blanketly said "they've never said that the Doctor is an alien and you're all wrong na-na-na-na-na-na!". Had they read the question more carefully, it would have been obvious that he was asking for the first time that the Doctor was said to be an alien, and you would have to be pretty darned ignorant of Who history to think that "Rose" would be the answer to that question. So it's either, "they misinterpreted his question," or "they are just plain ignorant."



3 days, 23 hours ago on Moffat Questions “Twelfth Doctor” Title

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I've a very unusual opinion about "The Time of the Doctor". It is probably my second-favorite individual story of the new series, but that is because of the main story, not the regeneration. To me, the bulk of the episode is sheer brilliance that flawlessly encapsulates the Eleventh Doctor and his era. Plot-wise, it accomplished everything that I wanted it to, and introduced Tasha and Handles, both of whom I really enjoyed. I didn't have any issue whatsoever with the runtime; sixty minutes was sufficient in my opinion. There were twists that I loved, and moments that were absolutely artful. However, it's the final regeneration scene that I'm indifferent toward. It's a good enough regeneration, I suppose, but to me, that was where the flaws were. I would have done it very differently. I think the only issue I had with the main plot was the convenient regeneration nuke. Personally, I think that the best regeneration story is by far "The Caves of Androzani", and if we're talking in terms of story value, then "The Time of the Doctor" would again be my second in that regard, but if we're comparing the regenerations themselves, then... this one would be more toward the middle. It's not spectacular, but it's not horrendous, either.


3 days, 22 hours ago on Why I Love the 11th Doctor’s Regeneration

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In "The Name of the Doctor", he knew that he was going to his tomb, but he couldn't anticipate much beyond that, and that's not much different from any old adventure. In "The Time of the Doctor", they were right on the precipice of a new Time War, so the Doctor knew exactly what to expect (although, it should be noted - he didn't know that it was Trenzalore yet when he first sent her away), and wanted Clara to have nothing to do with it.


3 days, 22 hours ago on Why I Love the 11th Doctor’s Regeneration

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I'm not sure I follow on your first point, but as for the second part, we don't know if they knew his regeneration would destroy the Daleks, and even if it did, that's not all of the Daleks in the universe or even in the vicinity. He blew up one ship and the ground forces, is all. The rest presumably fled because "Oh crap, he just regenerated! How!?!!?! He really did have a trick up his sleeve!", but if the Time Lords did return, then there would still be a risk of war because it probably wouldn't be long before they found out. And the Time Lords didn't really have a choice but to close up the crack and trust the Doctor to use his new lives to find them one day and let them out, because if they didn't do that, then the Doctor would have died and they would have been lost forever anyway.


3 days, 21 hours ago on Why I Love the 11th Doctor’s Regeneration

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The TV movie. Better yet, though, he says that he is human in "The Sensorites", and "The Evil of the Daleks" implies that he was once a human, but became mutated by his extensive time-traveling.


3 days, 21 hours ago on Moffat Questions “Twelfth Doctor” Title

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The "Fall of the Eleventh" was a description of events from the perspective of outside observers, who are also not the Doctor. Basically, he's saying exactly what you did, that the Doctor, personally, doesn't really care what number he himself is and never refers to himself by his number. Moffat isn't talking about nods or meta-references like the Fall of the Eleventh or the Doctor's football jersey. But what I don't get is his drama over having to write "the Eleventh Doctor" in a script, and saying that it's "unpleasant." It's really not as big of a deal as he's making it out to be, and I'm saying that as someone who's generally a big supporter of the Moff.


3 days, 21 hours ago on Moffat Questions “Twelfth Doctor” Title

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"I felt new music should have been used for the regeneration" -It probably would have been, had they not siphoned off of the music budget in order to fund the 50th. But then we probably wouldn't have had the two RTD-era pieces that appeared in "The Time of the Doctor", and that would have been a shame because those pieces were used very effectively.


3 days, 21 hours ago on Why I Love the 11th Doctor’s Regeneration

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That is what Moffat is comparing to counting the number of houses that you've lived in. Yes, it's a statistic that you can be aware of and talk about, but it's not really a part of who you are as a person. It's just a figure. If asked, the Doctor can supply an answer, but he's not going to say to himself, "I am who I am because I am my twelfth incarnation." To continue with the house metaphor, that would be akin to me stating my current address in addition whenever somebody asked for my name.

3 days, 23 hours ago on Moffat Questions “Twelfth Doctor” Title

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I was quite a Dalek Sec fan, myself.


4 days, 5 hours ago on Deep Breath To Be Shown in Cinemas Globally

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