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@yinxzon I don't think what syntheticzero or I said has anything to do with "us vs. them." It seems many here are too worried about being divisive or saying things that may offend people instead of being honest about what is really going on with Lin now. What's the big deal? Not one single reply here is bigoted or racist. No one is saying Asians are better than Americans. We're just being transparent with our assessments of Lin and the state of Asian Americans.

Blacks and Latinos NEVER shy away when it comes to these topics. They are usually pretty honest and sometimes it can even come off as borderline abrasive. But they're also groups of people who are VERY unified. Asian Americans as whole, particularly Chinese Americans, not very unified. You have ABCs, FOBs, Taiwanese and Mainlanders... everyone is segregated. And us Asians wonder why there isn't an Asian Oprah or Jesse Jackson. Stop worrying what the majority thinks. Stop being passive. Stop being silent. This is not "us vs. them." This is us vs. us. The faster we come to terms of our place in this country and have more of these kind of discussions, the bigger the voice we'll have.

2 years, 6 months ago on What I See In Jeremy Lin

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@Byron Hing Never did I say if we're proud of our roots it automatically makes us less American. I agree with what you replied with even though it has no correlation to what my posts said. I'm simply stating that we shouldn't feel embarrassed of being in touch with our roots and ethnic background, something you briefly mentioned in the beginning of your reply.

2 years, 6 months ago on What I See In Jeremy Lin

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@syntheticzero Welcome to 21st Century PC America, where talking about race and related conversation topics are taboo. I think you're spot on with your assessment of Lin's play in regards to his ethnic and cultural background. The things you say doesn't make Asians better than Americans or vice versa. It just simply points out legitimate observations of one particular ethnic group that you're probably very familiar with (at least that's what I get from your avatar picture).

Many Americans have very little knowledge of Asian culture, but that won't stop their arrogance of thinking they somehow know more than you, or that they have the right to lecture you about what is right or wrong. Having healthy, honest conversations about race and various cultures is actually a good thing. The more we understand and know one another, the better we may get along.

2 years, 6 months ago on What I See In Jeremy Lin

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@kenzo Appreciate your reply. Here's what I was trying to get at with my two posts. There are some posters here who say because of Lin's recent success it proves that Asian Americans and Americans are in fact equal. I disagree with that. If we were equal then Lin would've gotten D1 scholarship offers when he was in high school and there definitely could've been more Jeremy Lins before him. The reality is, out of all the Asian Americans in the U.S. only ONE so far has made it. This is not a knock on the NBA because frankly those other Jeremy Lins most likely didn't even get the opportunity to even sniff college ball let alone get a shot in the League.

My "middle finger" comment is basically saying that Lin is breaking the stereotypes. Asian males aren't all unathletic, nerdy, asexual or martial arts experts.

The "slant eyed, yellow skinned" comment is reiterating that no matter how "American" we may view ourselves white America will still look at us as minorities, which is why we should stop trying to pander to the majority and instead be ourselves. Blacks and Latinos have carved out a big segment of the cultural pie in the U.S. They're definitely keeping true to their roots. Us Asians are lagging behind and it seems would rather just be that round peg that fits in the hole, but in reality we're a square peg.

We shouldn't feel the need to be white washed so we can be accepted into the fold. But if you really must be accepted then at least let your skills and actions do the talking, exactly what Lin is doing now. We shouldn't forget where we're from and we should be proud of our Asian heritage and background. Don't compromise any of the latter to appease your American dream.

Lastly, it seems as if the author only now felt proud of his Asian background because of the recent Jeremy Lin hype. How only now he felt like he had a voice. That is rather sad wouldn't you say? He seems to be someone who was overly concerned about being "American" and accepted. This is what spurred me to write everything in the aforementioned. Hope I've cleared up some things now.

2 years, 6 months ago on What I See In Jeremy Lin

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Just to add to my previous comment... the fact that it took this long for an Asian American to be in the NBA is a testament that Asian Americans and Americans are NOT the same. It doesn't matter how much you proclaim you're an American or how much you assimilate yourself with white America because at the end of the day we're still regarded as slant eyed, yellow skinned minorities who continue to face racism and discrimination. Just ask Jeremy Lin.

Jeremy Lin is succeeding and getting all this praise because of his skills as a basketball player and his humbleness as a person. Instead of trying hard to assimilate, we as Asians and Asian Americans should be proud of our ethnicity and cultural background. We should gain the respect of white America because of what we bring to our jobs, community and society as a whole. Not because we pander and kowtow to the majority, or have the title of "American" behind "Asian."

Jeremy Lin is essentially giving a big middle finger to white America. He's saying look at me, us Asians do have basketball skills, Yao wasn't a fluke, my parents are from Taiwan and I am of Chinese descent. So quit the self hate, insecurities and woe is me I am a meek Asian. Strap on a pair and be more like Jeremy Lin.

2 years, 6 months ago on What I See In Jeremy Lin

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Here we go... another Asian American who has a bit of self hate and feels the need to assimilate with white America. Reality check: it doesn't matter if you were born in the States, have perfect English or even have a white girlfriend... you're still that slant eyed, yellow skinned foreigner to the majority.

Your nationality is American because you were born here, but don't forget your ethnicity is Asian, Chinese, Korean, what have you. You and your parents make it seem as if "American" is a representation of who you really are, your roots, culture and ethnic background. Wake up! Be proud of your Asian background, learn how to speak the language, travel back to the Motherland and for Christ's sake stop feeding into the stereotypes of being an unassuming, meek Asian.

I was born in Taiwan. Came to the States when I was 2 so I can understand the identity issues you're speaking of in this post. However, those issues plagued me in my younger years when I didn't know the importance of being proud of one's ethnic and cultural background. Time to grow up, look at yourself in the mirror and identify with the one thing that is closest to you than any amount of American assimilation can give you.

Jeremy Lin is indeed a truly inspirational story for all Asians, whether they're ABCs or not. People from China, Taiwan and even America should all be proud. Lin, who is good friends with Yao and has done charity work with him in Taiwan, seems to also not have forgotten where his roots are from. If anything you should take away from Lin's story is exactly that of the latter.

2 years, 6 months ago on What I See In Jeremy Lin

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