Livefyre Profile

Activity Stream

 @Jeremy Vohwinkle

Good points. Country highways in Ontario are largely 80km/h, so if you go 10km/h over (not that I ever would), you're hitting 90km/h which is the optimal speed for fuel efficiency in most vehicles. The divided interstate-type highways are 100km/h, so at an average speed of 110, you're really wasting fuel on an Ontario highway. Nevertheless, you can't buy Mountain Dew Code Red because in Canada, cola is the only pop that can have caffeine :( (energy drinks are classified as 'natural health products')

2 years, 6 months ago on How to Take an Inexpensive Road Trip

Reply

I must admit that I peversely LOVE interstates and reststops. I'm Cdn, so our highways suck and you can't buy Mountain Dew Code Red along the way.

2 years, 6 months ago on How to Take an Inexpensive Road Trip

Reply

@pfinschool

EXACTLY. It is NOT OK to enter retirement with debt. If you're 50 and have debt, when are you going to pay it off? You'll probably never be making more money than right now. If you're a GenY who has consumer debt/student loans, when are you going to pay it off? After you buy a house and have kids? It's propaganda like the above infographic that encodes debt as "empowering", when really it should be seen for what it is: indentured slavery.

2 years, 7 months ago on Infographic – Generations and Debt

Reply

"What would you do if you had a lot of credit data and wanted to help educate people on how to be better with credit and debt?" Really? Based on that figure, the average Gen Y kid has $14,000 in unsecured, worthless debt that's given them no assets and, based on the current job market, hasn't improved their long term earnings potential. Also the Boomers, who are supposed to be acquiring wealth, are mired in 100k of debt, and they're "Strong and Steady in pursuit of the American dream"? What a load from the same geniuses that brought us the subprime crisis, and the housing bubble. Of course the credit companies are rejoicing and saying you're "strong and steady" in 100k of debt -- they make money selling your credit history to lenders.

2 years, 7 months ago on Infographic – Generations and Debt

Reply

lol that an "Offer in Compromise" requires the applicant to pay a non-refundable fee. Give to Caesar what is Caesar's, because you'll pay much more dearly if you don't.

2 years, 7 months ago on What to Do If You Can't Pay Your Taxes on Time

Reply

Do any of these companies deliver to Canada?

2 years, 7 months ago on Five Places to Find Discount Prescription Eyeglasses

Reply

The two Credit Rating Agencies in Canada are TransUnion and Equifax. Unlike America where you can check your score for free, easily, in Canada we have to jump through tons of hoops to see the free report. We have to send in a request with photocopied ID by mail, then confirm a piece of mail, then wait for weeks. And we still don't get to see our credit score. These agencies make megabucks selling our personal information to companies that want to check our credit. We don't see a dime of that. But then we can't even access all of that information for free? Sounds more like a communist bureaucracy than a free market to me.

2 years, 7 months ago on How Often Should You Check Your Credit Score

Reply

I think this clearly demonstrates that:

1) in the long run, equities out-perform

2) diversification is essential to reducing volatility and risk (PROPER diversification, as in across industries and asset classes)

3) to maximize long-term returns, investors need to stop paying gratuitous fees (I really wish we had 0.1% MER Vanguard funds up here in Canada)

2 years, 7 months ago on How to be a Conservative Investor

Reply

Yes, there's nothing to say "I value and cherish our relationship" like a cheap homemade card and frugal home cooking on the only calendar date each year dedicated to the romantic love you share with your partner.

2 years, 7 months ago on How to Have a Memorable Valentine’s Day Without Spending Any Money

Reply

Buy term for the following amount: your liabilities + 5 years avg income x dependent + winding up costs (funeral, legal fees) + bare minimum (e.g. 60k) to support your partner for a few extra years IF he or she doesn't work and has no reasonable prospect of getting a decent job. There. No whole life, no fancy assessments. Done. Quit waxing philosophical and go buy term life insurance. Worry about insuring against long life (e.g. building a pension) rather than insuring against death; that's where it gets complex.

2 years, 7 months ago on How Much Life Insurance Do I Need?

Reply