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Well said, Rob!

1 month, 1 week ago on My hope for the #Autism Community

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Good luck to you and your family. Safe (and relatively calm) travels!

3 months, 2 weeks ago on Just kill me now and get it over with

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So true, MJ. It's a constant struggle to feed the beast. I've found myself telling people that producing content is like exercising. Once you stop making excuses and just start doing it, you feel invigorated by it. But it's so easy to fall back into bad habits. Good luck to you and your team. I'm looking forward to more of your blog posts in the future. 

2 years, 4 months ago on Walking the Walk: The Challenge of Marketing Your Own Marketing Business

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AP at least gives you flexibility in the case cited above, unlike the unrelenting Oxford comma. Plus a good writer in this situation should probably call out  to readers that Stalin and JFK are working the pole in this story and phrase the line this way: "We invited the strippers: JFK and Stalin."That's AP Style, BTW.  

2 years, 6 months ago on In Which I Cave to Oxford Comma Pressure

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@AshlynBrewer You're missing the same point Google is: What's the hook for the average consumer? Yes, Google Plus has cool bells and whistles (Circles, Hangouts) for the average person. But is that enough to draw broad interest. The answer so far is no. What is Google going to do to change that? The other thing to remember is that the cool bells and whistles are easy for competitors to copy. Facebook and Twitter segmentation will probably improve considerably in 2012, if consumers even care. And while Google Hangouts are cool (particularly the Google Docs link), I'd be willing to bet Microsoft offers a similar feature in their next iteration of Office, which features much richer and widely used business tools. Google+ is looking a lot more like Groupon these days than a Facebook killer. (Let's not forget that Google tried to buy Groupon for a billion dollars last year. I'm not sure they'll ever get what really works in social business.)

2 years, 9 months ago on "Google+ for Business: How Google's Social Network Changes Everything," By Chris Brogan - WIN THE BOOK

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@AshlynBrewer Pinterest doesn't have a billion dollar company, and it's taking off while G+ still doesn't have the traction, understanding or interest (pardon the pun) with the public. They've made a case on why the product benefits Google. Why should people trade leisure time they're spending on Facebook, Twitter, watching TV, etc. to interact with brands on G+? Other than: "We're Google!" they haven't made much of a case. If people don't come there and use the G+ tools, it doesn't matter. This could just as easily blow up in their face as it could be a resounding success.

2 years, 9 months ago on "Google+ for Business: How Google's Social Network Changes Everything," By Chris Brogan - WIN THE BOOK

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I may be in the minority, but I think Google Plus may not succeed. Google has done a great job of integrating Plus into all of their platforms, but I'm not sure advertising publicly as the Google alternative to Facebook is the way to get people to use it. What's the benefit to consumers? We know that if people use it, it will make Google search results more rich for Google. But why does the average consumer care. Pintrest has taken off because it's provides a service that consumers value. What's that value to the average user. My mom and wife love Pintrest. I can't talk about Google Plus for more than five minutes before they fall asleep.

2 years, 9 months ago on "Google+ for Business: How Google's Social Network Changes Everything," By Chris Brogan - WIN THE BOOK

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Great post, Jay (and very timely for our discussion at Standing). When we've been discussing our blog/website revamp, we haven't considered the retention aspect nearly enough. I have a feeling this post (and the insightful comments from your readers) will be required reading for the agency during the next couple months. cc: @ashlynbrewer .

2 years, 9 months ago on The Only 4 Reasons Agencies Should Care About Their Own Content Marketing

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