Livefyre Profile

Activity Stream

@Frank_Strong @David Caron my experience has unfortunately been the same. After this round of LinkedIn spam, I received an email solicitation from someone acting as the "assistant" to Mr. Robertson -- the publisher of ReelSEO -- trying to sell me the same conference package. 


Clearly, this sales person was in possession of an email list harvested from the LinkedIn connections of not just one, but multiple contacts affiliated with ReelSEO. That to me would indicate a violation of what is clearly stated as LinkedIn terms of use. I really don't see them having any motive to stop unless they're reported. 

5 months, 2 weeks ago on Is LinkedIn Becoming a Spam Paradise?

Reply

@Frank_Strong @kfom Just yesterday I also eceived the same email spam from Mr. "Jessie Spiers." (This after ReelSEO gives their rather dismissive assurance that wouldn't be happening again.) There's no actual profile on LinkedIn of anyone by that name, nor anyone of that name listed with ReelSEO that I can find. 

6 months ago on Is LinkedIn Becoming a Spam Paradise?

Reply

Thanks for sharing the Fuze Meeting review, Cliff! One of the partner agencies I do contract work for uses this program, and your in-depth coverage has convinced me that I should try it out for my own remote podcast interviews. What I'd really like to see is the ability to do separate track audio recording, like I can already do in Skype's eCamm recorder. 


Time for me to give you a much-deserved 5-star rating on iTunes! In the meantime, I'm saving up for your next Podcast training course after the April one. You've been a great help to me and I'm glad that my colleague Gordon Firemark referred me to you.

9 months, 1 week ago on 348 The Episode I Almost Deleted

Reply

How ironic that Social Media Club is now having author bios, considering I was refused my request for my own author bio on my own articles here. Seems like Social Media Club really isn't about rules or ethics, just opportunism.

1 year ago on Social Media & Political Reform | Social Media Club

Reply

Ironic. When I was a volunteer contributor to Social Media Club, I was specifically refused to include my own tagline and backlink on any of my articles. Now I see how exceptions are made rather than having actual rules or ethics. 

1 year ago on The Rise of Social in Customer Care | Social Media Club

Reply

Yep, it looks like Ari Herzog is banning comments that are justifiably critical. Sad and pathetic.

1 year, 1 month ago on Why Aren't You Commenting Here? | Social Media Club

Reply

Sorry guys, but you can't really call it "social" media if you're not being transparent with authorship. 

1 year, 1 month ago on Pros & Cons of Ghostwritten Content | Social Media Club

Reply

As a former guest blogger and contributor to Social Media Club, I would tell anyone considering blogging for Social Media Club to first be aware of the reputation that it's brought on itself. You may want to think twice before getting involved with these guys.

 

My name is Grant Crowell, and I back up in person what I post here digitally. 

1 year, 1 month ago on Looking for Monthly Bloggers | Social Media Club

Reply

How is it someone can talk about a visual content strategy and make no mention whatsoever of YouTube or other online video? Video is the most visual content out there. 

1 year, 4 months ago on 4 Tips to Create a Visual Content Strategy | Social Media Club

Reply

I'm hoping this comment area will welcome for some constructive criticism, since I happen to have worked in the online video marketing industry, and have done a lot of my own recorded Skype calls I've learned from my past mistakes on.  

 

Bad audio and bad video distract from a good interview. If people having to struggle to listen and watch, they will be less inclined to follow the content and be persuaded by the speakers. Here are just some examples of what I mean:

 

-- The audio on these video is terrible. The noise levels can be piercing, which could be fixed with the aid of a mixer or a levelator. It always sounds like Jeff Ogden is speaking from the inside of a steel drum! This can be fixed with either a lapel mic or a USB headset, and ideally in a room that has some kind of padding to absorb the sound of his voice from bouncing off the walls.

 

-- The backdrop is a poor choice. for both speakers. Gray doesn't provide a good contrast with the speaker, and just makes them both look rather dreary

 

-- The audio track on Jeff's voice doesn't match with the video. This is also a problem with saving your recording over a Skype line sometimes, instead of using a dedicated line or separate video feed. A solution can be to separate the audio track and match it up with the speaker's video. 

 

-- The slides appear rather blurry on the embedded screen size, or simply too small to make out. Of course this can be solved by opening up the video in YouTube and with the expanded screen feature, but viewers may be turned off by the initial experience to want to do that. 

 

-- Calling oneself a "TV Show" will create some eyerolls when the audio and video technical issues I mentioned here are clearly not what's the standard of broadcast television. 

 

Also important, there is an overwhelming amount of self-promotion going on around the video content with the multiple watermarks, and which makes the actual video screen itself quite reduced in size. People can understand the need for sponsors to run a show, but it's really questionable on the benefit for having so many of them in the video's entirety. My recommendation would be to show them at the intro and closing rather than for the full duration.

 

I understand the concept of Marketing Made Simple. I think when it comes to these kind of Skype recorded  interviews, it needs to be just as much about Video Marketing Made Smart. 

-- 

1 year, 5 months ago on How Marketing Technology Changes Marketing Strategy: An Interview with Scott Brinker | Social Media Club

Reply

Did you intentionally mean to leave the first outtake in there when you get the guy's company name wrong? I would refer to that as "Marketing Made Strange."  

1 year, 5 months ago on How to Engage Fans and Followers - Marc Fischman of Hyperactivate | Social Media Club

Reply

I'd also like to say we need a complimentary slogan of, "If you get it, support it." The challenge with sharing and making things free to audiences is it can overshadow the need for it to be maintained by financial or other material support. When there's a glut of content, it can get de-valued and not recognized that people who provide it and engage with fans need to pay the bills. There's a lot of demand for the product and the experience, but not enough value for the people who provide it. 

 

That's why I like to say that "social" needs to be an investment into human relationships for shared value if it is to thrive. Without that, we will become dis-engaged and distrust, and go back to business-as-usual.

1 year, 7 months ago on United We Share | Social Media Club

Reply

I'm a fan of two-step verification, although it can be very tricky when you are trying to transfer over multiple accounts with the same provider, like I've experienced with my own credit union. 

1 year, 7 months ago on Social Media and the Two-Step | Social Media Club

Reply

@socialmediaclub Good article and infographic, thanks for sharing! I would differ on just one point: I would say a brand advocate can still be effective in their role while being rewarded with some pay or other incentives, provided that their initial advocacy with the brand was done independently and without such incentives. Brands should be making a point of acknowledging and rewarding such brand advocates for the good work they do, and brand advocate should disclose any such pay, rewards, or other incentives that they receive or choose to take from these brands. I'm a believe that brand advocates should be rewarded for what they do right, and audiences will be glad to have such disclosure without affecting their loyalty to the advocate or the brand.

1 year, 8 months ago on Influencers Versus Advocates—Who Really Matters? | Social Media Club

Reply

I completely agree, Jeannie; and I think this also applies to political candidates who have Facebook pages, yet never personally engage with their audiences on there. Is it too much to expect them to participate once in a while, and accept that the unpredictability is what makes them appear genuine?

2 years, 2 months ago on Conversation @ http://socialmediaclub.org/blogs/from-the-clubhouse/social-customer-expectations

Reply

Thanks for sharing this helpful how-to content, Courtney. If I could add something to the conversation, I'd like to also recommend this interview I conducted with Google's Lead on their Authorship program, Sagar Kamdar. It goes deep into the benefits of doing authorship from both a social and SEO perspective. http://www.searchenginejournal.com/google-authorship-an-interview-with-googles-sagar-kamdar-part-1/46243/

2 years, 2 months ago on Conversation @ http://socialmediaclub.org/blogs/from-the-clubhouse/get-know-google-authorship-social-media

Reply

Thanks for sharing this, Chrissie. It's my belief individual should have a social media profile separate from whatever professional organization they are hired by, and just learn to make distinctions between what is shared between work and their personal life, while still being able to share things in both realms when appropriate. That's what I like to call being "per-fessional." :-)

 

Question: Where can I find the article from the law professor out of Illinois you are referring to? 

2 years, 2 months ago on Conversation @ http://socialmediaclub.org/blogs/from-the-clubhouse/who-owns-your-social-media-account

Reply

Actually it would have been helpful to put this subject in the context of video creation/marketing with an example or two.  (How come you didn't mic your guest after you introduced him and asked a question? Hearing you standing out louder with your "yeah... yeah... yeah...yeah" and other one-word comments while he was talking, I found really distracting. 

2 years, 3 months ago on How to Turn Viewers into Brand Advocates Through the Art of Primal Branding [Creator's Tip #57]

Reply

I'd be interested to hear of any thoughts on if it now makes more sense for nonprofits with small Google Adwords budgets (think around $2K for the entire year) to put it all into video ads on the YouTube and Google Display network than traditional text search results and Google network sites. Considering how many more people are now using their mobile devices to watch video, it could be a really good way of getting attention without having to pay for views if the viewer changes their mind early.

2 years, 4 months ago on Google TrueView In-Stream Takes AdWords for Video Mobile

Reply

@FrankSchwarz thanks for the compliment and your thoughtful question. Don't treat this as legal advice, but my understanding is that you are allowed to video record anyone in a public place. However it's what you do with that footage afterward that can be susceptible to legal action. For example, if you're using the footage for commercial purposes, then you could be violating people's "right of publicity" and they could 1) have the footage removed online and 2) potentially sue you if they can make the case that you used their image and likeness for commercial gain.  

So Frank, it's one thing to video record people on the beach acting like fools and posting that online. It's quite another thing to try and profit from it! I'm certainly not suggesting you would, though. It's just a good way of distinguishing between free speech and commercial speech, and the former affords us all more rights than the latter.

2 years, 4 months ago on Without My Consent – How Video Professionals Can Avoid Online Privacy Violations

Reply

@GeniusRocket thank you for your praise and sharing your own nonprofit client experience, oh smartest rocket of them all! ;-) I'd really like all nonprofits to think beyond just a single video, but how they can stretch out the experience to show a real commitment to engage with their audience around it – not just stopping at content to be shared, but conversations and customer care. That's what it will take to build both contributions and a real sense of community. (Can you spot the 5 C's? :-)

2 years, 4 months ago on 10 Video Campaign and Fundraising Tips for Nonprofits and Social Causes

Reply

Chris, the answer to your question, "I don't know why you even bother to blur the face of a kid in a basketball game when you can just make the video private." It doesn't actually matter if your video is labeled 'private' if there's the possibility that the people featured in the video (especially if it's a child and you don't have the parents' consent) might object to the recording where they are identified. You could still be showing your "private" video to one or many people other than yourself! There are actual cases of individuals that will give a public screen of a video they labeled "private" on YouTube.

2 years, 4 months ago on YouTube's Face Blurring Tool Lets You Protect Identities in Videos

Reply

 @tamcdonald I will gladly and gratefully do any and all of the above with you, Tim! Only right that I participate in your next Google Hangout and Spreecast event. 

2 years, 4 months ago on Facebook Post Leads to Community Manager Job

Reply

Congrats on the position, Tim -- you certainly deserve it! Thanks for your advice and helping me out as well during your time with Social Media Club in Chicago. I'd certainly like to live stream and learn more about the HuffPost Live Community, for reasons of not just strong politics and causes, but also for some entertainment value :-)

2 years, 5 months ago on Facebook Post Leads to Community Manager Job

Reply

 @DustinNay Thanks, Dustin! Sorry for my delay in getting back to you, just been swamped with conferences. 

 

I'd actually offer that FTC Disclosure guidelines are very much related to video. There's much video content on the Web that is "brand-supported" without any mention of the brand behind it, and any material relationships that the video creator or spokesperson is making a review, testimonial, or some kind of endorsement for. It's also a challenge with video because oftentimes any disclosure language that might have been included in the on-page description or a YouTube annotation, won't show up when it's shared. (YouTube annotations don't show up on mobile, I recall.) 

 

I believe the best solution we have for now is supporting awareness and education, having a dialogue, and eventually supporting an independent organizational or individual who can do some kind of blogsite that points out these issues, along with examples. Probably something entertaining yet informative, and showcasing everything from the blatant to the common. 

2 years, 5 months ago on FTC’s New Dot Com Disclosures: What Every Online Marketer Needs to Know

Reply

@Dan Demsky thanks for your insightful comments, Dan. I clearly missed that paragraph in the article on mentioning the topic of arousal, although I still think it should be included as an actual category for future studies. I agree that too many creative agencies and ad agencies go for the cheap joke rather than a willingness to try for a more meaningful relationship. Plus most of them suffer from no real strategy for engaging with the audience past the initial content experience on a more personal level -- like with customer service or any other kind of relationship marketing that's so easy to do with social media. 

Much of even viral video is eventually forgettable. What lasts is the feeling of what happens afterwards between the brand and consumers, and that requires putting people in place to directly engage.

2 years, 5 months ago on Brand Mentions in Social Video Content Have No Effect on Sharing Potential

Reply

I'm really surprised they didn't include one of the biggest emotional responses - arousal! I somehow don't think that can be lumped in under "exhilaration" or any of the other emotions they categorized.

http://www.reelseo.com/sex-social-video/

2 years, 5 months ago on Brand Mentions in Social Video Content Have No Effect on Sharing Potential

Reply

 @KymleeIsAwesome I'd agree with you, and add that what also needs to be part of the barometer is the disclosure of any business relationships between the journalist/blogger and either their publisher, sponsors, advertisers, or professional partners. Many news enterprises fail to disclose these relationships appropriately, despite what the FTC's guidelines on disclosure  actually are. Part of that is ignorance, part is a mistaken assumption of what is required for disclosure. What I know is consumers expect and deserve transparency behind what news and commentary they're getting.

2 years, 5 months ago on Are Bloggers Different than Journalists?

Reply

 @KymleeIsAwesome I agree that there are many valid ideas of what journalism should be, but I think it's especially important to be aware of what guidelines that governing bodies like the FTC say they are. The issue becomes tricky when so much of journalism today is not traditional and has some kind of relationship with commercial speech -- whether they are a bona-fide journalist working for a publication with a sales and advertising wing, or a self-supporting blogger with their own sponsored and paid content.

2 years, 5 months ago on Are Bloggers Different than Journalists?

Reply

 @WordsDoneWrite I'm currently researching all of their documentation from 2009 to present to find some specific guidelines on placement. That being said, I think all of the above are good places, and I will ask the FTC liaison if they have any specifics. (I want to see if they can give publishers options rather than a one-size fits all deal.)

 

Currently I'm doing that with my own author bio on where I'm a freelance columnist for. One example is at the bottom of the page in the author bio, with a link pointing to more info on the business relationship. The other points to a separate bio page that lists I'm a freelance contributor right in the title.  Here are two example of what I mean:

 

http://video-commerce.org/2012/06/video-commerce-tips-from-bbq-guys-passion-personality-and-purpose/

 

http://www.reelseo.com/about/grant

 

My personal view is that sponsored content (by an outside advertiser or 3rd party vendor) should be labeled as such above-the-fold of the page. If it's a paid or other business/material relationship between the publisher and the guest blogger, I would recommend just including a link at the bottom of the page inside the author bio, that points to more information on both the author and the business relationship. What do you think?

2 years, 5 months ago on Are Bloggers Different than Journalists?

Reply

 @WordsDoneWrite Thanks for your thoughtful responses, Amber! (I'd rather eat the wet noodle if it's been seasoned right ;-)

 

I should mention that I recently learned from the FTC's own media liaison shared with me their determination of publishers that have guest bloggers. Even if they aren't being paid or there's no literal "endorsement" of anything being given, they still require disclosure of any other material or business relationship beyond the guest post. Such as, if a guest blogger is an upcoming speaker of the publisher's commercial venue, like a conference. Thing is, pretty much all publishers I've talked with are completely unaware of that, as I myself was earlier. I think many of them already do a great job with disclosure of their sponsored content and staff bloggers on endorsements, so this might be a great opportunity to exercise further transparency and build consumer trust. (It's something I'm doing myself!) 

2 years, 5 months ago on Are Bloggers Different than Journalists?

Reply

Sorry, I noticed a spelling mistake. I meant to say, "With traditional journalists employed under an established publication, that professional relationship is already disclosed."

2 years, 5 months ago on Are Bloggers Different than Journalists?

Reply

Amber, thanks for sharing your story and your perspective. As a journalist and a blogger, here are some other questions for consideration that perhaps you can share your thoughts on.

 

1) If you're a journalist and you're being assaulted or otherwise injured while doing your job, should other people have any greater responsibility to help you out than you chose to with them?

 

2) If your video blogging or video journalism makes you or your publisher money because of the traffic that supports advertisers, does that compromise at all the ethics of your journalism? For example, taking a video of someone getting beaten up is not so much newsworthy as it is meant to attract eyeballs for it's shock value -- the same thing that punks in school do beat up a fellow student and video record it, and publish it on YouTube? (Not saying that it is, but you can see the similarities.) Is the only difference between a video journalist and a  blogger is that a journalist is trained to report it in a proper context? 

 

3) The FTC considers bloggers having any business relationship with a publisher or advertisers/sponsors (either through the publisher or on their own publication such as a blogsite or even a web video channel) to be commercial speech. With traditional journalists employed under an established publication, that professional relationship is already discloses. Yet for most bloggers today receiving material compensation or some other business advantage by the publishers they are guest contributors for, no such disclosure is made. Should bloggers be treated more as entrepreneurs than journalists, when they are trying to be self-puyblishers, self-sustainable, and profitable?

 

Also, the formal journalism agencies I've worked for in the past always had some commercial wing that did affect the news content side. I believe these situations are even more prevalent today. That's why I encourage both formal and new media journalism establishments (from the enterprise to the soloprenuer) to disclose their business relationships with those who sustain their practice. 

 

I've dealt with the ethical issues of video blogging and video journal over at ReelSEO.com. I also recommend checking out this white paper: "Press FORWARD: A Contextual Video Strategy for Today’s Newspaper & Magazine Industries"

http://www.ramp.com/2011/12/5205/

2 years, 5 months ago on Are Bloggers Different than Journalists?

Reply

 @dlundin Thank you once again for your extensive expertise in this field! So I'm looking at two Canon DSLR packages right now:

 

1) First there's your recommendation on the T2i with the macro 50 ($549 + $279 on B&H photo)

 

2) Second, is the Canon EOS 60D with the Canon EF-S 18-135mm lens (on B&H for $1,200 at http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/732048-REG/Canon_4460B004_EOS_60D_DSLR_Camera.html

 

Here's my scenario. Most of my work will be of close-up interviews rather than shooting from far. However I foresee some situations where I will be shoot from a distance as b-roll footage (like of a speaker giving a presentation), and then the close-ups will be my interview with them (with either me in the shot or just them), and some of just me solo. 

 

Granted, I'm just a novice-intermediate with photography, but I do plan on taking good photos to go along with the video footage. Possibly, to use them in freeze frames for the embedded video, and certainly in published articles. Some settings are likely to be in conference rooms, and mostly indoors. I don't know if any of these factors any affect on the equipment recommendation, but it sounds like what you've recommended can be pretty versatile.

2 years, 6 months ago on Zoom H4N Review: How to Get Better Audio for DSLR Video [Reel Rebel #6]

Reply

 @dlundin  @Grant  @CAL_Living That's quite the price difference between the Canon 5D and the Rebel T2i -- like several thousand dollars! I've wondered when doing a two camera setup (and getting two angles),  if you use the better camera for the close-up shots or the wide angle shots?

 

That being said, the T2i does have great reviews on B&H Video. Any recommendations on a lens to go with the body? (I've been recommended a zoom or wide-angle by my photographer, although the one on the B&H site for $369 seems like a decent standard lens to start with.)

 

Thanks again, everyone, for your help!

2 years, 6 months ago on Zoom H4N Review: How to Get Better Audio for DSLR Video [Reel Rebel #6]

Reply

 @CAL_Living  @dlundin Thanks for making this resource available and your excellent tip! I just downloaded it and will be reading it this weekend. I'm definitely planning to use it for short clips and no longer than 10 min, since I've too frustrated working with my Canon AVCHD camcorder (HFS 200) that take a long time to transcode lengthy video files. 

 

Any recommendations on a DSLR for shooting HD video with decent audio capabilities (for external mics) ? I'm looking into the Nikon D7000 and am highly impressed with the quality, but always open to checking out other models.

 

BTW, I very much like your FTC disclosure page at http://nofilmschool.com/disclosures/. Too many publications still fail to disclose any business relationships between themselves and bloggers, and I'm one of those folks who strongly believes that transparency is what consumers want with any informational content.

2 years, 6 months ago on Zoom H4N Review: How to Get Better Audio for DSLR Video [Reel Rebel #6]

Reply

 @dlundin  @CAL_Living Thank you both! It seems to me that it makes more sense to just have a shotgun mic attached to your DSLR, and any separate digital recording device (like the Zoom H4N) can be something positioned close to the speakers, even with lav miss attached to them both? 

 

For others, Pluraleyes can be found at http://www.singularsoftware.com/pluraleyes.html

2 years, 6 months ago on Zoom H4N Review: How to Get Better Audio for DSLR Video [Reel Rebel #6]

Reply

Good article, thanks for sharing. I recently made the mistake of not telling my own videographer to bring a slate (and left mine at home), and not even thinking of doing the "clap" – so trying to sync the audio on two videos is a real pain. My question: wouldn't you need an XLR-1/8" cable, since DSLRs typically have an 1/8" mic input?

 

2 years, 6 months ago on Zoom H4N Review: How to Get Better Audio for DSLR Video [Reel Rebel #6]

Reply

 @veetleinc Wouldn't you get an equal amount of amusement watching any schizophrenic street person have an argument with themselves while walking in circles at a park on a clear day? Or is it just the video component that ads to the fetish? ;-)

 

Thanks for making me part of your awesome brainstorming, Tina. You know what's way more awesome? Finding someone to actually pay me nicely to do it. (The publisher here keeps wanting me to do a video interview with my shirt off, and he swears he's straight.)

2 years, 7 months ago on Improve Your Video Interviews - Body Language Tips for Marketing Pros

Reply

 @veetleinc Thanks for the feedback, Mr. Letter-Icon. I agree that swaying during a video can also be rather distracting, especially if it's being done while the other person is talking. Also, that guy went on wayyyy too long with his introduction. I'm man enough to tell that to his face and give him a real beat down, too. ;-)

2 years, 7 months ago on Improve Your Video Interviews - Body Language Tips for Marketing Pros

Reply

Thanks for sharing, Chris. I wondered a lot, Is "social video advertising" really a legitimate term? How is it actually different from regular video commercials if the brands behind them aren't putting any effort into direct engagement with their customers from the ad? Otherwise, any television commercial you put up on YouTube would have the title of being a "social video" solely by its placement, and nothing of it's own engagement.

2 years, 7 months ago on Social Video Advertising Views Soar to Record Highs in 2012

Reply

Christopher, what do you think of this model being an opportunity for musicians who want to go independent from major record labels, and look to the same crowd sourcing for raising money to hire professional video creators to produce and publish videos of their own songs? Probably the musician/band/artist could provide the existing song(s) in a cheap shoot for people to listen to and decide on. Kickstarter comes to mind, but maybe this provides another avenue worth trying out.

 

Two articles on the same subject that just came out and are worth watching and reading: 

 

http://mashable.com/2012/05/01/billy-corgan-revolution/ 

http://www.webinknow.com/2012/05/we-are-the-media-amanda-palmer-and-the-future-of-your-business.html

 

 

2 years, 7 months ago on Crowdfunding Comes to Social Video Through Flattr Deal with Dailymotion

Reply

 @videoleadsonline Hey Video SEO hound, lord over the over hounds of the SEO dog pound... That is actually one of the selections of the new Adwords for Video, with TrueView's search results selection. You can also select it for Google's Display results (across their Google contextual network), but you can only have the search selection work for YouTube search results, not Google. (It would be cooler if it DID work for Google.) 

2 years, 8 months ago on YouTube Sends Envoys, Plays and Money to Push Video Advertising

Reply

 @Frank_Strong that's a good distinction between what's inherently social versus what can be socialized. I think in our modern era of social business and connected consumers, most of not all of PR today needs to include a socialization strategy.

2 years, 8 months ago on 7 insights from a social media marketing study

Reply

Also interesting to note on page 37 of the report, is that press releases are labeled as "non-social marketing." Is that a really a fair label for PR? 

2 years, 8 months ago on 7 insights from a social media marketing study

Reply

Enjoyed this post and share in your lamentation-cum-indignation in how many Enterprises still  make person-to-person engagement difficult if not impossible, which defeats the whole point of doing social media or any other aspects of social business. My question is, does PR need to evolve where it comes with a promise of direct engagement with individuals who are part of the market they want to reach, as well as those who are affected otherwise and want to be heard and responded to? 

2 years, 8 months ago on Why companies are more prone to social media crisis

Reply

Good interview, Jay! I have a technical recommendation that really works for me: Get a good condenser or lapel microphone for yourself that can eliminate the reverb sound. With long interviews, an external and unintended audio can become an increasing distraction. Myself, I use the Apogee ONE for my Mac with XLR input, with either a condenser microphone or a Countryman lapel mic. Might as well get the most bang for your buck with the folks at Candido! :)

@debng I have a question if you're around: do you have any tips in your book around doing online community management with video or video platforms, like Google Hangouts? How about with Facebook? Or do you think its best geared for live streaming platforms like UStream, Livestream, Justin.TV, etc?

2 years, 10 months ago on Activation, Comfort, and Other Secrets of Online Community Management

Reply

Goal for 2012: Encourage social business

Goal for 2013: Social business becomes the norm

Goal for 2014: Put an end to the word "social" in business

The word "social" ultimately shouldn't even be required to include in anything. When 'social' becomes an organic way of doing business across the organization and externally, it ultimately shouldn't have to be necessary to have as a qualifying adjective for how we do business. The reason we do find the need include it today is because we have lost our way with how to be social. (By "we," I mean too many organizations who put profits over people, or treat the two as mutually exclusive.)

2 years, 11 months ago on Comparison of 100 Top Companies on Social Business and Corporate Culture

Reply

@MikeWise07@markwschaefer Hi Mike – I enjoyed reading your article and liked how well you explained the dismissive argument behind why some business people don't "go social." That's really speaking to their preconceived idea that social technologies around online communities and communication (past the direct channel of email or maybe IM) must not be relevant to business, because it is so accessible to everyone and so in use by everyone. T

he idea that technology that is democratized for the masses must not be serious for doing business with is of course, bunk. But I used to deal with this mentality all the time when I was a member of Chambers of Commerce in earlier years. (I quit my last one the end of 2010.) These are people that on some level feel like they just want to stop learning what's new, and just want to regurgitate what gives them confidence. To those people I say, do you want to learn, or do you want to be right?

2 years, 11 months ago on Social Media Success May Depend on HR

Reply