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@xmego9

Well, I overreacted.  I shouldn't have been so harsh.  I apologize for that.  I have seen a few self-righteous people sounding off on this topic for quite some time now and they've come out of the woodwork on this most recent ruling.  I guess I was trigger happy with that one.

I don't think the Ivy League model is necessarily bad, but I do think these kids deserve a scholarship for playing these sports.  I think even if the Ivy League model takes hold then there will still be a lot of money generated by many major programs.  Things would change obviously and the days of stadiums filled with 100K would probably be over.  I don't know that the NFL or the NBA will ever come up with a viable player development plan that doesn't involve colleges doing most of the work for them so I think a lot of very talented athletes will still come up with some way of paying for college so they can get access.

Either that or a lot of schools are going to start forking over cash from their general budget in order to keep the most popular sports going.  Of course, that could also involve discontinuing many of the non-revenue sports to save money.  I'm just afraid of a Pandora's box being opened that at the end of the day leaves no one any better off than they are now while stripping away much of what is beneficial.

2 weeks, 4 days ago on The End Is Nigh (For College Sports As We Knew Them); What The NLRB’s Ruling Means For The SEC

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@xmego9  

Sorry, but it's the self-righteous do-gooders like you that get on my nerves.  Does it really affect your life whether or not major college sports is a multi-million dollar industry or not?  Does it really bother you that all of these college athletes fall all over themselves to get a scholarship at major programs that "exploit" them?  Never mind the fact that participating in collegiate athletics is a purely voluntary endeavor and the only reason these kids sign up for it is because they know it will benefit them...

Or are you one of these people who cares for nothing in life other than an elitist academic culture and the thought of athletes leaving college with a degree that has your school's name on it(something that will benefit them tremendously in life, help them get jobs, provide for their families, become better citizens of the community) just stick in your craw?  Could you tell me how a university's mission is devalued because they invest in major athletics?  Does a degree from Vanderbilt or any school for that matter really mean very little in the practical world because they spend millions of dollars every year on a football team(something that does little else other than promote their university and generate funds)?


If you prefer the Ivy League model, that's fine.  Everyone has their own preferences.  The people who have such disdain for major college athletics as though it's the bane of our society, however, floor me.

2 weeks, 5 days ago on The End Is Nigh (For College Sports As We Knew Them); What The NLRB’s Ruling Means For The SEC

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So what are the chances that the NCAA adopts the Ivy League model where there are no scholarships...no nothing?  I think college sports would still exist, just as they exist at the Ivy League schools, but would it all essentially turn into a glorified high school organization?

2 weeks, 5 days ago on The End Is Nigh (For College Sports As We Knew Them); What The NLRB’s Ruling Means For The SEC

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@the_voice

It would be an interesting idea.  I doubt it will ever happen, but if major realignment is over then that may be another way to reach into markets that the SEC otherwise wouldn't get into.  I like these options because they are all in new markets:

VCU(large public school, good academics, Virginia market)

George Washington(large private school, good academics, DC market)

1 month ago on The SEC Pays The Price For Bad Hoops On Selection Sunday (Again)

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I have a wild idea.  Perhaps SEC schools should start looking to Europe for some of its answers.  The European pro leagues tend to play a more fundamentals-focused kind of game.  Maybe, some of the coaches there would be interested in good paying jobs in America that offer quality competition and national exposure.  Too much of a culture shock?  Maybe, but it would be interesting.

Also, I think one of the problems is that SEC coaches are all trying to out-athlete each other.  I can say Bama has essentially had that philosophy for a long time now even before Grant was the coach.  The NBA has done that for a long time and the quality of the game has suffered.  I don't just think it's the one-and-done rule that is hurting college basketball so much even though that's part of it.  I think the general departure from fundamentals and set offenses are hurting the game.  Coaches need to look for players that understand the game and play fundamentally sound ball.  It seems like coaches today are only looking at physical stature and overall athletic ability meanwhile overlooking really good players who don't measure up in raw potential.  Think about Kobe Bryant...he's a great athlete no doubt, but what makes him special is his dedication to the fundamentals of the game.  And think about this...Kobe grew up in Europe where they teach a completely different type of game to the youth players.

Just something to gnaw on.

1 month ago on The SEC Pays The Price For Bad Hoops On Selection Sunday (Again)

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