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So Goldberg nearly destroyed his own company in pursuit of a competitor, resulting in the loss of both online stores to the European market. If he cared a bit less about other people replicating his business model, and a bit more about making it work properly himself, then he wouldn't be in this position.


In any case, the idea that Fab somehow "owns" the concept of a curated online store is simply bullshit. Goldberg's belief that he has some kind of moral right to stop other people doing the same thing is arrogant ignorance. You don't see Jeff Bezos complaining about other organisations offering a full-inventory online store. And, hey, Amazon isn't doing too badly either.


If Goldberg wants to make Fab a success he needs to get his head out of his arse and start acting like a businessman and not a spoiled brat. It wasn't his "crazy ambitions" that were the problem, it was his insane jealousy.

6 months, 2 weeks ago on Fab Europe no more: The dramatic retreat is complete

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Er... "principles" isn't a mis-spelling. It may sometimes be the wrong word (the author may have meant "principals"), but that's an entirely different type of error.

6 months, 3 weeks ago on Conversation @ http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/230457

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As has already been pointed out, this is useless anywhere where chip and PIN is the norm for card transactions (which is almost everywhere except the US, and will be the US within the next few years). And, since it's essentially a skimmer, it has potential uses that go far beyond what most cardholders would prefer to see possible :-)

Also, it won't work in any situation where the merchant has sight of the card, since their merchant agreement with the card companies explicitly requires them to reject any card that is not the card that was issued. it's only going to be usable, therefore, in cases where the cardholder carries out the transaction without handing over the card to a retailer - and the only places that's true are online and chip'n'pin, where this system won't work either.

8 months, 1 week ago on Coin bets that the future of payments can be found by improving credit cards, not replacing them

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@allworldcaucasn If you're not prepared for how to handle it when things beyond your control go against you, you're not giving it 100%.

1 year, 1 month ago on What if things don’t work out for you?

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Really good post. While the industry and bloggers love to fawn over the big gamblers who struck lucky, the reality is that if you lack the necessary nous to come up with a suitable plan B then there's a strong chance that you haven't properly thought through your plan A either.

1 year, 1 month ago on What if things don’t work out for you?

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This is, of course, the prime driver behind online piracy. Survey after survey shows that it's the sheer inconvenience, not cost, which pushes people away from legitimate sources. The oatmeal puts it very well: http://theoatmeal.com/comics/game_of_thrones

1 year, 1 month ago on “Arrested Development” describes Netflix’s business strategy

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You can, of course, get all of these albums at your favourite torrent site, which makes the policy of restricting authorised access rather foolish. Spotify may not be perfect (far from it, in fact, although that's another story), but it's users are far more likely to turn to the Pirate Bay to fill in its gaps than they are to go to iTunes.

1 year, 6 months ago on Top ten albums of 2012 not on Spotify

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"the music industry doesn’t give independent artists many attractive options for selling their music online in any profitable way"

 

Never heard of Bandcamp, then, I presume?

 

"reKiosk  uses Dwolla rather than PayPal"

 

So excluding all non-US artists and customers, as well as those who don't want to set up yet another payment system just to buy or sell music.

1 year, 11 months ago on reKiosk’s Marketplace Helps Bands, Bloggers Actually Make Money

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 @sandman_va  @Francisco Dao You're right, of course, to distinguish between those who use the two job strategy as a route to growth (and in order to avoid having to rely on external funding) and those for whom the "other" job is just a sideline. But the original article didn't, and I think that's a major omission.

 

I entirely agree, though, with your comment about people who act as if having a blog is running a media company.

2 years, 1 month ago on The New Entrepreneur Classification System

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You're completely wrong about the first type. Many successful entrepreneurs (probably most, actually) start their business while still working full time at the day job. That's not because they're less than fully committed, or because they're using the day job as a kind of security blanket in case the business fails, but because they are taking all the income from the day job and investing it into building the company. Doing two jobs, and doing both of them well, is about as far as you can get from being a hobbyist. Some of our biggest and best tech companies started like that, and the people who start them are usually the ones I respect the most.

 

The real hobbyists are the ones who never have to put in their own money, or burn both ends of the candle to get their business off the ground. They're the ones you describe as "FO". For them, being an entrepreneur is just a game played with other people's money.

2 years, 1 month ago on The New Entrepreneur Classification System

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"Most of us simply aren’t wired to remember hundreds of distinct passwords with a mix of cases, letters, numbers, and symbols".

 

Which is good, because that's not the best way of memorising passwords anyway, and it certainly doesn't make them more secure. 

 

http://xkcd.com/936/

2 years, 2 months ago on Dashlane Launches iPhone App, Clumsy Thumbs Everywhere Rejoice

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You appear to have just invented folders and filters, which have been available in common email clients such as Thunderbird and Outlook for a very long time.

2 years, 2 months ago on Is GoMail the Future of Email? I Hope So

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This is an excellent example of how the media loves to invent a story out of nothing. 67 people allowed to carry on driving after reaching the usual disqualification limit of 12 isn't particularly noteworthy, given that magistrates do have discretion and are perfectly entitled to use it every now and then. And it’s quite easy to reach 12 points without ever doing anything seriously wrong – a couple of fixed-penalty speeding tickets issued by cameras followed by a single instance of driving without insurance as a result of a genuine oversight in missing the renewal date by a day, for example, would do it. Or someone who is caught out by a politically-motivated speed limit change and gets snapped every day on their way to and from work for a week - that's 30 points in one go. So there are probably quite a lot of people who reach 12 points and can reasonably count themselves unlucky to be banned, as well as a fair number who are deservedly allowed to carry on driving.

What would have made this an interesting story is if some comparisons had been made between different courts. If, for example, it could be shown that some magistrates are too inflexible and unwilling to exercise discretion at all, while others are excessively lenient, then that would be worth investigating. Another angle that would be worth looking into would be whether magistrates are more likely to be lenient with certain types of offenders, or whether leniency patterns correlate with widespread use of speed cameras - are magistrates more willing to give the benefit of the doubt to people who have simply totted up the points automatically rather than being actually caught doing something dangerous? Any of those would have made a genuinely newsworthy story. But simply basing an article on the fact that some people are dealt with precisely as the law intends and that magistrates use the law as it is written is just lazy and shoddy journalism that's only too typical of the media. You might just as well have written an article on the toilet habits of bears or the religion of the Pope.

2 years, 8 months ago on Putting FOI into practice: how I got a front page on work experience

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