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Google has had incognito mode in chrome forever. Actually I remember when it was announced, I was sitting in a Google IO session and the presenter told us all it was awesome if you needed to find a cure for foot fungal infections but didn't want your friends to know. The entire audience sniggered, everyone realizing that incognito mode is used, in the vast majority of cases, for surfing porn.

I don't think many people think of incognito as a foil to PRISM, rather it's the modern day equivalent of a plain brown paper bag....

1 year, 3 months ago on Google redefines irony

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Postcards from a not so dystopian future... Or in other words, Europe should relax a little bit.... http://www.forbes.com/sites/benkepes/2013/10/16/postcards-from-the-edge-a-letter-from-a-post-prism-future/

1 year ago on A red tape-wrapped rant at Europe’s flawed cloud thinking

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@garyturner Gary, the question here is whether "specific requirements" are real or perceived. Also there is obviously a big difference between an infrastructure stack on which SaaS sits, and the backoffice tools on which a business runs. To your two examples, billing and back office systems, both of these are pretty well supported by flexible and customizable SaaS products today - say Zuora or Chargify for your billing and one of the plethora of project management/CRM offerings that exist.

The flourishing of SaaS solutions in the past 8 years or so means that the requirement for build versus buy is very different than it was previously.

1 year, 1 month ago on One foot in the cloud, another on the ground

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Just a point of clarification - Xero uses Yodlee and hence the problems with weird standards and formats is handled by Yodlee and not Xero itself - it's the cost, rather than the hassle, of bank feeds that Drury is saying justified the move. But agree with your summary that net/net it's probably the right thing to do...

1 year, 2 months ago on Xero will shutter Personal, the world yells foul

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Good post Phil - VMware is standing on a burning platform that they're all to aware of. The problem is (to extend a metaphor) there's folks within the company that love the heat and keep dousing the structure with more gasoline. The existing revenue stream are, as I suggested in a post today, similar to kids on crack - super hard to give up.

That said, Gelsinger and co know all this and are working hard to change - expect to see some real carnage in both the company and the ecosystem in the months ahead if they're going to be successful.

More here - http://diversity.net.nz/out-with-the-old-in-with-the-new-vmwares-new-reality-and-the-carnage-to-come/2013/08/27/

1 year, 2 months ago on VMware and the reversible cloud

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Phil - seems like SoSaaS to me (to use your phrase of old). Doesn't Sage need to really reinvent to become a true cloud company?

1 year, 2 months ago on Sage keeps calm, carries on to the cloud

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Nope - because it won't be long before people realize that EVERYTHING can be sifted by a great number of Governments around the world and that any resistance by way of provider location or encryption, is largely futile...

More here - http://diversity.net.nz/blockprism-yeah-good-luck-with-that/2013/08/06/

1 year, 2 months ago on Warning: EU’s PRISM exploitation will cost US $35bn

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If a standard flaps its wings in a forest somewhere, but no one in the world actually cares or adopts that standard, does it really exist? Or, put another way, the only standards that matter are those that rise naturally through industry use and not by the creation of big committees filled with stuff shirts....

1 year, 4 months ago on Taming the nexus with Platform 3.0

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Hopefully this funny will ease your grief a little - http://diversity.net.nz/the-ultimate-analysis-of-workday-salesforce-and-oracle/2013/06/26/

But I agree with you - this is so... depressing on so many levels, and kind of an affront to those of us who (naively maybe) believed all of Benioff's rhetoric. It just shows what a master strategist Ellison is, I don't know what he has on these guys but it's amazing to see them seemingly bend to his demands...

More here - http://diversity.net.nz/a-big-week-for-oracle-ellison-yet-again-proves-hes-a-master-strategist/2013/06/26/

1 year, 4 months ago on Salesforce + Oracle? Good grief! (the 5 stages)

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Dennis - while I agree that two tier ERP lies at the heart and to the future of this announcement, right now it doesn't get there. It seems more about Oracle getting some reflected cloud glory and "maybe" NetSuite enjoying some cred from the HCM association with Oracle.

One thing it does show is the absolute brilliance of Ellison as a strategy - it makes me want to throw up a little but it's pure gold..

More here - http://diversity.net.nz/a-big-week-for-oracle-ellison-yet-again-proves-hes-a-master-strategist/2013/06/26/

1 year, 4 months ago on Oracle and Netsuite – the last shoe drops

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@dahowlett Thanks Dennis. I guess I'm seeing a few things happening simultaneously:

1) A fundamental change in the way organizations look. A number of factors (generational, technological, economic) are going to result in future organizations looking and working differently from what they do today. I'm imagining much a more fluid, organic approach towards what constitutes and org. It won't be so well defined. Of course many say that is just futuristic nonsense but we'll see. If the prediction is correct, then less and less organizations will be the big monoliths that can have their needs met by traditional "big box" ERP. In which case the question is whether the traditional ERP vendors can build products of sufficient flexibility to meet this need. My prediction is generally not.

2) At the same time as this, NetSuite is moving decidedly up the food chain, but also strongly into verticals (viz the manufacturing and retail news of late). This means that not only do they butt heads more often with the smaller end of big box ERP, but that organizations are seeing them as a compelling alternative. In fact at SuiteWorld I spoke with a number of customers who fell into two buckets - firstly those who wouldn't have used NS a couple of years ago, when the functional breadth wasn't sufficient and secondly those who use NS as the lower end of their two tier approach - rolling up into a traditional ERP

So essentially I'm seeing more of a macro demand for two tier, coupled with an increasingly compelling message from NetSuite. If you add those two things together (and obviously many would disagree with the basic premise here), NetSuite becomes more of a target for Oracle.

As always, the opinions of just one lone voice and YMMV

Regards

Ben


1 year, 5 months ago on NetSuite taps market for $270 million

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The chances of Oracle NOT acquiring NetSuite outright get lower and lower the more people buy in to the "two tier ERP" idea. But then again I've been saying that for a few years now....

1 year, 5 months ago on NetSuite taps market for $270 million

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@dcook11 In Francisco's defence (and hey, I don't know the guy from a bar of soap) - having attended a number of events of this ilk, there does seem to be a real tendency towards lightweighted belief as opposed to deep critical thought.

The bigger issue here is that, one could suggest, this tendency is a response to societal changes and the demands of an attention-poor and satisfaction-demanding public.

1 year, 8 months ago on The cult of ideas

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Francisco - an incredible important and astute post. I was at a conference last week (an excellent event BTW, no criticism there) where one of the speaker roused the audience into an Obama-like "yes we can" fever with such themes as "Fuck misogyny, our industry is rife with it" and "Designers, demand your place at the board table" and other snippets. Rather than critical and analytic thinking around the statements, the crowd was carried away in what, quite frankly, felt a little too much like  a Nuremberg rally for my comfort.

I sense the tide will eventfully turn - once everyone has had their five minutes of fame and the high-falutin ideas are proven to be nonsensical, we may just return to a more robust way of looking at and talking about these things.

Here's hoping

1 year, 8 months ago on The cult of ideas

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@njyx Not me dude, I don't have a TV, or cable, or Netflix, or Hulu, or or or..... Hippies y'know

1 year, 10 months ago on Well, I for one like the Bravo “Silicon Valley” show

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@njyx Oh and one more thing - this is probably the best thing to happen to Ben, Sarah, Hermione and the rest in their careers. They knew what it was and were likely pretty sure how it would turn out but did they ever get themselves some fame in the interim....

1 year, 10 months ago on Well, I for one like the Bravo “Silicon Valley” show

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@njyx Meh, I'm not so sure dude.... actually yeah I am, the show is awful, but then again so is most "reality" TV. To simply single out this show is probably unfair - all modern TV is shit... Luckily we all have ValleyWag and Business Insider to keep us highbrow....

;)

1 year, 10 months ago on Well, I for one like the Bravo “Silicon Valley” show

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@adron @benkepes Adron, it was a tongue in cheek snark - pretty much all of the folks in here pimping their company's wares are friends, it's all good. Gotta put food on the table and all that... / @themaria @AaronEndre @kevinmarks 

1 year, 10 months ago on Dear Yammer and the entire cloud wave: If you expect companies to use your software, it has to work

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@AaronEndre @benkepes @themaria @kevinmarks @scott_allison @sarahcuda "outraged"? Aaron, you're in luck. I have a halo just sitting here waiting for you - you are indeed the caped crusader of consumer protection and we love you for it...

Oh and I'm sure Huddle is stoked too

;)

1 year, 10 months ago on Dear Yammer and the entire cloud wave: If you expect companies to use your software, it has to work

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@kevinmarks yessum. And Maria is, I'm sure, stoked to have the support of Salesforce behind her ;)

All good, just enjoying being the malcontent in this group of folks

1 year, 10 months ago on Dear Yammer and the entire cloud wave: If you expect companies to use your software, it has to work

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Man, is there anyone commenting on this post who isn't marketing their own product? @themaria for Yammer, @AaronEndre for Huddle, @kevinmarks for Chatter, @scott_allison for Tibbr, @bretthellman for Hell, @rurikbradbury for Unison.... I bet @sararcuda is feeling like the madam at a great big knocking shop right now... It's holiday season folks, quit selling for a week or two

*ducks*

1 year, 10 months ago on Dear Yammer and the entire cloud wave: If you expect companies to use your software, it has to work

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@AaronEndre @themaria Oh but I loves me some nice product marketing masquerading as informed blog commentary.... ;)

Happy days....

1 year, 10 months ago on Dear Yammer and the entire cloud wave: If you expect companies to use your software, it has to work

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 @JohanKlarin Thanks Johan, I don't have breakout %ages in terms of what Dell is investing but I believe that yes, it is substantial and an integral part of where they see themselves in the future. Thanks for the comment!

2 years, 2 months ago on Dell Is Done? Just a Little Premature

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Hay-mish - great post. I've written on many occasions of the fact that I'm dubious about Dropbox - it is an amazing product but the company has been built with a surprisingly immature attitude - not so much technically (barring recent problems) but more from a "we're building an enterprise product and we're going to create a strcutre with sales, support, service, SLAs and maturity to back that up".

 

Many people question Google as an enterprise-ready product, but they're far, far more mature than Dropbox is. I typify Dropbox as a product tht was created by a few guys and who were surprised by their own success. It's had amazing consumer uptake but unless they get some real enterprise smarts in there soon - they're toast.

 

The other issue is that Dropbox is unlikely to come close to the economies of scale that Google achieves - if it comes down to a simple price war, the 'plex will win...

2 years, 3 months ago on In Battle For Your Files, Google Drive Gets a Jump on Dropbox

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I'm sure you've seen it but...

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZKCdexz5RQ8

2 years, 4 months ago on You Might Be A Smanker If…

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While the videos started off a little distasteful (to be honest some very smart and moderately humble software execs came across as... douchebags) this latest video was very valuable. Aaron is right on the money with his three step classification of users (consumer, SMB, enterprise). I would say however that the challenge for anyone heading for the top end of town is really building out the models that enterprise needs. Flexible licensing, integration with their existing systems (both hardware and software) and a maturity level that they're used to from legacy vendors are all important. Oxygen Cloud (@juliamak) who replied below works for them, is taking an interesting approach to the problem space by bringing "cloud-like" document sharing and collaboration to existing enterprise storage - that's one valid approach that will succeed in the medium term, the Box approach is another take.

 

It comes down to maturity, while @levie is undoubtedly a little different from what CIOs are used to, Box as a corporation is articulating a consistent and mature story, which (in my view) DropBox is not. Yes these consumer tools have significant enterprise adoption through rogue IT, but the key here is for vendors like Box and Oxygen cloud to move into the space, have a conversation with CIOs, explain the rogue IT that is occurring within their organizations, and have a credible and secure alternative to slide in to deliver the agility that users need, with the robustness that the C-suite demands.

2 years, 4 months ago on CEO Supper Club: Aaron Levie’s Key to Beating Dropbox

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 @dealarchitect Awesome reply Vinnie - would love to see @hamishmckenzie continue this theme further....

2 years, 4 months ago on The Great Replacement: Microsoft, Yammer, and a New World in Enterprise Computing

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Great post Hamish - I've been meaning to comment for awhile. I agree that we're seeing a big shift in enterprise IT - away from monolithic products, from massive capital expenditure, from ludicrous maintenance fees.However I respectfully disagree and believe it would be wrongly hasty to write off the legacy vendors this early. In the past few weeks we've seen some massive acquisitions - SAP buying SuccessFactors, Oracle buying Taleo and RightNow - this trend of consolidation and protectionism by the large vendors will continue.

 

Just the other day Larry Ellison was excited to announce that, post spending spree, Oracle is now the second largest enterprise Cloud vendor globally on a recurring revenue basis. SAP has had a few false starts, but it has an amazing cloud Tsar now in Lars Dalgaard and it looks like SuccessFactors will be the launching pad for a newly invigorated cloud strategy for SAP. Then Microsoft amazed even the most prescient of pundits a week or two back by embracing a world beyond their own proprietary languages and even tipped its hat in the direction of open source.

 

Yes disruption in absolutely in the cards but all indications that I have are that traditional vendors are now realizing that they need to disrupt themselves before the likes of box, atlassian, yammer, zendesk, enStratus et al do it for them. Watching the (somewhat awkward) videos from teh CEO dinner that Sarah hosted, it becomes obvious that even the poster child of this new age, Box CEO Aaron Levie, realizes that the industry is highly cyclical and that consolidation will occur alongside the fragmentation.

 

I'm totally with Mike Cannon-Brookes on this one - don't dismiss the legacy players (both at the enterprise, and the SMB end of town), just yet....

2 years, 4 months ago on The Great Replacement: Microsoft, Yammer, and a New World in Enterprise Computing

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Good post @alexwilliams  - as you suggest the question here is one of social as a fabric vs social as a bolt on. This is being played out by other vendors as well - witness the differences between the salesforce and the netsuite approaches

 

http://www.diversity.net.nz/social-an-enterprise-overlay-or-an-enterprise-fabric/2012/06/12/

2 years, 4 months ago on Microsoft's Yammer Acquisition Points to the State of the CRM Market

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 @hamishmckenzie  @benkepes The best I've ever had? From a super smart cloud developer evangelist person. "Wow, you're from New Zealand. That's awesome, it must be so cool living so close to Egypt". I shit you not....

 

And that is why I'm going to leave my laptop, head to C4 and enjoy an ace flat white... Oh and yeah, since we're both kiwis I figured it wouldn't be lost on you...

2 years, 5 months ago on How to Understand Silicon Valley Speak

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 @hamishmckenzie And anyway - you're a Kiwi? Dude, you so look like a hobbit... and do you know I just love FoTC? ;-) #HeardItAllBefore

2 years, 5 months ago on How to Understand Silicon Valley Speak

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 @hamishmckenzie So what I'm working on right now is a startup pivoted from a previous startup which hadn't quite reached escape velocity. Anyway, this new pivot seeks to take the seemingly orthoganally opposed trends of big data and wee data and, by using a SoLoMo enabled predictive analytics play, leverage the two to derive some insights which look set to really amp the social graph. All in all I'm super excited about this play and have super-angel's jumping over each other to take the lead on our adviser round which we're using as a bridge to take us to our first couple of angel rounds. Of course we're going to take around $2M on the adviser round but (to keep up the orthogonal theme) we're running this totally as a lean startup 9at least for this iteration)

 

Or something...

2 years, 5 months ago on How to Understand Silicon Valley Speak

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Dude - hot tip "wee data" is the neologism for tomorrow....

2 years, 5 months ago on How to Understand Silicon Valley Speak

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"And it’s for that reason that we’re constructing the series of investments that we’ll be bringing to market this year and in the subsequent years." - Martiz sees the threat and realizes that while infra will continue to be a cash coe in the near and even mid term, longer term the world will move to higher value platforms. Why does one think they bought SlideRocket? SocialCast? - because the world is moving up and Moritz wants #VMW to be there.

 

Witness his comment that he sees the biggest threat coming from #MSFT - a vendor that plays higher up the stack and has an application ecosystem to boot...

2 years, 6 months ago on VMware CEO Paul Maritz on OpenStack

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 @krishnan Just to clarify, since my comment could be misconstrued. I didn't mean that Krish's analysis was backwards, my comment was intended to articulate that a strategy that sees VMware not monetize higher stack offerings as a way to support their infra revenue seems backwards to me.

2 years, 6 months ago on With Its New Marketplace, Amazon Web Services is Becoming the Next Microsoft

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 @alexwilliams Because the higher up the stack you go the more value and higher differentiation you achieve. Using a high stack service in order to sell low stack products doesn't make much sense to me (at least not in the mid to long term)

2 years, 6 months ago on With Its New Marketplace, Amazon Web Services is Becoming the Next Microsoft

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 The interesting thing here is that more vendors are seeing infra become commoditized. Hence I kind of disagree with the contention of @krishnan that CloudFoundry is mainly a way for VMware to ensure they l keep their infra business - that seems backwards to me....

2 years, 6 months ago on With Its New Marketplace, Amazon Web Services is Becoming the Next Microsoft

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Good post Alex. AWS is navigating a difficult road by rolling out what is essentially a platform that can be a one stop shop for infrastructure and higher-up-the-stack services. In doing so they compete with PaaS players (think Heroku with its add-on offerings) and application platforms as well.

 

I'm not sure that BitNami will be quite rejoicing - sure they get some love at the moment, but it's a small stepo to AWS simply offering Wordpress, Drupal et al directly within the marketplace and eating their partner BitNami's lunch.

 

Sure Werner has famously said that they don't want to be a PaaS< but I suspect what they do want to be is far more dangerous for far more players than simply a PaaS.....

2 years, 6 months ago on With Its New Marketplace, Amazon Web Services is Becoming the Next Microsoft

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Actually paul, I'm wearing a munted shirt here at defrag today!

2 years, 11 months ago on Why I’m excited about CloudBeat 2011: It’s not just another vendor-centric event

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