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That is funny! But I've also seen the truth in it. While I've never sent out an email swearing at our subscribers, I have sent out mistakes and had to follow up with apologies. My experience mirrored the ones here - people were very forgiving, and empathized with the mistake. In general, most people know that to err is human, and when we're humble and real, they see themselves in you and offer you the grace they wish they'd receive. 

1 week, 6 days ago on Crisis Communications: What Happens When You Swear at Your Customers

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Hey Mr. D., happy birthday and thanks for letting us all get to know you a bit better!

2 months, 4 weeks ago on The Spin Sucks Inquisition: Kelly Dietrich (aka Mr. D.)

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Echoing others' thoughts, this is a fantastic post, @Eleanor Pierce. One thing I wanted to add some emphasis on, if I could, is the concept that when it is reasonable and possible, integrate real-life connecting into this. As so many of the people @ginidietrich  has featured in the past showed me, she typically met them online where they got to know each other, then met in person and an even more solid relationship was born. Obviously that's not always feasible, and great relationships can still be built without it. But for many of us, relationships can be brought to a while new level once there's been a face to face connection.


In any event, I really liked this article, and this paragraph in particular:


"And remember to give as much as you get. Introduce people. Share job opportunities that aren’t a good fit for you with others in your network. Don’t just build relationships so you can get something from people down the line, seek to be a helper to the people you’re connected with."


Amen!

3 months, 4 weeks ago on Social Media Connections and Landing a Great Job

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I thrive on being a 'no' man. Not just because I enjoy being a thorn in someone's side, :)  but because I've been in a lot of meetings where someone has an idea and people get all excited about it, and no one stops to see where the problems might arise. 


I have caused my teammates and supervisors no small amount of headaches, but I'm certain in the long run I saved a lot more of them than I caused. And to Gini's point, 'no' men should be about making things the best they can be, not just being contrary for the heck of it.


Two last thoughts I would add, for those considering being a 'no' person at some point: 


1. Do so with respect. I've been around no men/women who were rude and belligerent about it, as if they expected opposition and were ready to battle. Hence, battle is often what they got, and the real work got derailed or compromised unnecessarily. (Maybe that came from past experiences, but it still didn't help their case.)

2. Be prepared to be wrong. Just because you think your opposing point is valid, doesn't mean it is, or will ultimately be perceived that way. Plenty of times I've lost those discussions, and of those, sometimes it was rightly so. Ultimately, as long as the best job/product comes out of the discussions, it shouldn't matter who was 'right' or 'wrong' or even who had what ideas and who didn't.

4 months, 3 weeks ago on Five Ways “No” Men Help Your Business

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Loved this, and agree wholeheartedly. What amazes me, though, is that after SO many things have turned out to be false, people still seemed very inclined to jump at the next one and believe it without a second thought. I especially noticed this regarding 1. the last Presidential election here in the U.S. and all the stuff being said about both candidates that was utterly false but revered as Gospel, and 2. the never ending saga of the Affordable care Act (Obamacare). Stories abound of all the horrible things that people have done or that laws will allow or what services no one not related to Bill Gates will ever ever ever get again, and people eat it up and worse, share it with all their friends.

Ugh.

5 months ago on Internet Hoaxes and Black Hearts

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Clay, this is a great post. I especially  love the real-life examples of how you applied dayparting to your newspaper's publishing schedule for online content. Thanks for sharing your experience with us.

6 months, 3 weeks ago on Using Dayparting to Grow Readership of Your Content

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@TaraGeissinger  Call me ignorant in these matters, but is there such a huge driver of traffic and sales form Wikipedia that it's worth it to companies to run that risk? is there really that much of a payoff?

As a marketer, I've never seen directly or heard of Wikipedia being such a large channel that it makes the payoff of bypassing their rules worth the risk to reputation as a shady business.
 

8 months ago on PR Firm Accused of Wikipedia Sockpuppetry

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What a great title. Made me smile on this Monday morning (being a short week actually helped too). 

On a more serious note, I would have to think that:
1. Companies know deep down that they'll eventually get caught doing this stuff. And by companies, I am referring to both the PR firms and their clients.
2. The potential reputation hit to those companies would be worse than the boost gained from the entries themselves.

Am I naive in this thinking? Is the fallout worth the gain in the long run? You'll notice I didn't even bother addressing the ethical side of this - I know it's hopeless to think that all businesses will behave ethically.

8 months ago on PR Firm Accused of Wikipedia Sockpuppetry

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@ginidietrich Chai latte, which isn't nearly enough caffeine. I may have to go out for round two.

10 months, 2 weeks ago on Seven Years of Blogging. Happy Birthday, Spin Sucks!

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@belllindsay, oh so YOU'RE the one stealing all my thunder. Hmph. Well, given your brilliant wit, broad experience, and unmatchably cool fashion sense, I'll acquiesce the throne of attention to you... for now.

10 months, 2 weeks ago on Seven Years of Blogging. Happy Birthday, Spin Sucks!

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Since I do have some narcissistic tendencies, and you're getting too much of the attention here, I'd like to find a way to somehow make this about me. But I'm failing to think of anything good, so I'll go for trying to look like a super nice guy. So, happy birthday, Spin Sucks!

On a completely unrelated side note, I got neither enough sleep last night or enough coffee this morning. Just saying...

10 months, 2 weeks ago on Seven Years of Blogging. Happy Birthday, Spin Sucks!

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@Word Ninja No need to apologize - it was nice to have an excuse for my embarrassment this time!

11 months ago on #FollowFriday: Jen Zingsheim

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@Word Ninja Wow, I just snorted out loud in the middle of a crowded Starbucks! My genuine thanks for helping me embarrass myself in public (again).

11 months ago on #FollowFriday: Jen Zingsheim

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I know this has been said many times before, and possibly even by myself, but I have to say it again: I LOVE how you do #FF on this blog. I really enjoy getting to learn something about the people you recommend, and getting a sense for WHY I should follow them. A sincere 'thank you' from me to you.

11 months ago on #FollowFriday: Jen Zingsheim

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@debdobson62 @ginidietrich These points may be even MORE critical for webinars, when it's typically harder to hold peoples' attention. Great thought, Deb!

11 months, 2 weeks ago on Six Tips for Better Public Speaking

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Great! Now I'm hungry for chile con queso! So much for the healthy lunch I brought in today. Thanks a lot, @ginidietrich!

On a more serious note, these are fantastic reminders. The session title and PowerPoint items I already knew and adhere to. With the description, I sometimes write that first to keep me focused on what I'm supposed to be making my presentation about. But intentionally presenting in a tweet-able progression and making sure people could walk away with a blog post idea - those are awesome points. (I usually try to present info in small pieces, but not necessarily consciously organizing it in a progression of tweet-able points so someone following an attendee on Twitter would walk away with all the major information.)

11 months, 2 weeks ago on Six Tips for Better Public Speaking

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@belllindsay In all seriousness, I don't think it is a chick thing. I think it's a thing for people who prefer to own their mistakes. It feels cathartic to get them out there, be honest about the mistake and the lesson learned, and move on. So, good for you for owning your actions!

11 months, 3 weeks ago on Business Lessons Learned: Remember to Watch Your Step

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@bobledrew I'm with you on this one. I don't believe for a second she thought she was off the record. In fact, I doubt she was thinking at all. My hunch is that she reacted (overreacted) in anger and realized later what a mess she'd created. "I thought I was off the record" was the best excuse she could hope to come up with. 

If that's the case, it adds another element to the lesson that we all need to walk away with. Many times, people asking for comment are looking for something juicy (to use Gini's word) to print/broadcast. Catching someone off guard or making them angry is a great way to get it. The lesson, then, is to always take two or three deep breaths before you answer something that you were unprepared for or for which your instant reaction is to become angry. Come to think of it, this is how I communicate with loved ones, as well, and for the same reason: to NOT say something I'll regret later.

11 months, 3 weeks ago on There is No Such Thing as Off-the-Record

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I genuinely love it when blog posts go back and cover some of the basics sometimes. Because as smart as we all are, we do need to be reminded not to make the entry level mistakes once in a while. 

@belllindsay, thanks for sharing these less-than-stellar moments with us, because if we're honest, we've all had them. And if we're forthright about them with each other, we might be able to help others avoid their own "oh s**t" moments.

11 months, 3 weeks ago on Business Lessons Learned: Remember to Watch Your Step

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I too, am a single dad, and I know exactly what you mean (only in my case, it's the weekly Friday night sleepover my 5 year old spends at grandma's house, since I lost my wife in a tragic boating accident a year and a half ago). You're absolutely right - that "me" time is CRITICAL for you being able to CONTINUE being a great dad (yes, I said great - accept it). You simply cannot pour that kind of energy into your kid and without replenishing it. It's just not possible. I strongly suspect that parents who refuse themselves this time eventually suffer some sort of breakdown.

That doesn't mean that doubting yourself or feeling guilty isn't normal, because it is. But just because it's normal doesn't mean it's right. Here's what I do: I think about my daughter and ask myself, is she happy? Does she seem well-adjusted? Is she becoming the kind of person I want to raise? when I am objective, the answers are always yes. And that's when I know I'm doing a good job of raising her.

As someone else commented below, it's also ok to focus on other things when is he there once in a while. In fact, I often find that my daughter wants to help me with some of the household work, and it's actually more opportunities for bonding and teaching. My daughter gets to see the importance of taking care of our house, and she is beginning to understand that taking care of her and all the household chores is a lot of work, and that as part of the family, she can begin to do her share. I am finding that she LOVES being part of the process of getting things done, whether it's helping me make meals, do laundry, or picking up the living room (which is mostly littered with her stuff anyway).

So, take a deep breath, let it out, and enjoy the quiet moments when Noah's at his mom's. You've earned them,. and you'll be a better dad when he gets home because of it.

1 year ago on Crappy Dad

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Great post, Marc. I think, as you alluded to here, that whether or not we think the two should be separate is a moot point. Many employers nowadays are checking all of our social profiles to research possible job candidates. Regardless of whether or not we agree or think it's fair, the onus comes upon people to manage their own reputations across ALL online touch points: Facebook, LinkedIn, Quora, Tumblr, Instagram, you name it. Because we have to assume that anything we post there (or allow ourselves to be tagged in through others' posts) will be viewable by people who are considering hiring us. And this has to be done ALL the time, not just when you're starting to send out resume's. 

1 year, 1 month ago on How (not) to use social media to find a job

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That's funny, the top social media question I ask  is something like, "Now, which @$%!#$@# password goes with this account?!"

Just a little (bad) humor for your Thursday. :) 

1 year, 2 months ago on Answering the Top Five Social Media Questions Marketers Ask

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@ginidietrich Maybe, but if I was TRULY smart, shouldn't I have known that already?

1 year, 2 months ago on How to Choose a PR Firm for Your Business

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What a great resource for small businesses just getting started and new to the world of PR. Thanks for giving me something so valuable to share so that I look smart by association. :)

Seriously though, I think one important thing a list like this does is educate people on how much work it is to get this right. Answering some of these questions means that you as a business owner really have to do your research before hiring a firm. I'm not saying that's a bad thing at all - quite the contrary. But I do think it makes people aware that it's not as simple as Goggling "PR firms" and picking one of the companies that's listed on page one of the results.

1 year, 2 months ago on How to Choose a PR Firm for Your Business

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@ginidietrich This is yet another great article. The step-by-step instructions are awesome. What I love most may be that I can see the deep truth in this - if you want journalists (or anyone else who's really busy) to listen to you, you must dedicate the time to building a relationship. Everyone wants to be an expert, but only a few will take the time to professionally show their expertise in a non-pretentious way.

1 year, 3 months ago on Get Media Attention: Six Tips to Pitch Journalists on Your Own

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Hi @ericajmoss 
I follow pretty much anyone @ginidietrich tells me too, but I am particularly fond of our mutual interest in dogs and razzing our friends about their embarrassing (but endearing) traits. (Really, Gini, boy bands?!) My pup, a rescue from a rural shelter, is a sweet terrier mix named Abby. And as a token of my poor judgement, here's my musical guilty pleasure: 80's pop music. I can't help it. I was a child of the 80's, and I still love all the bands that were big back then. 

Anyway Erica, it's a pleasure to meet you, even if I am four days late to the party due to a crazy travel schedule the last five days.

1 year, 3 months ago on #FollowFriday: Erica Moss

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I LOVE that @ginidietrich has chosen to recognize International Women's Day. And all these of women all seem wonderful. Actually, I'm sure they are, because Gini said so. :)

 

If you all will indulge me for just a few moments, I am going to jump onto a soapbox about something that I feel is very important. Before my current role, I spent eight years working for international relief and development organization World Vision. In that time, I learned that if you really wanted to change a community for the better, long term, you had to educate the girls and empower the women. Give them a voice and the training and skills to enact positive change for the families and communities. As a result, I did and still do sponsor several children through World Vision, because part of the benefit is that the children GO TO SCHOOL. Especially for the girls, that can be a huge game-changer in their lives.

 

I'm not here to promote World Vision, though I think they're great. But I do encourage people to consider finding an organization they like and respect who empowers and educates girls in developing countries to reach their full potential. The difference you can make for her entire community could be huge.

 

OK, please forgive my soapbox speech. I just think this is something that is very, very important. Now stepping off the box. Thanks. :)

 

(http://www.worldvision.org)

1 year, 4 months ago on #FollowFriday: International Women’s Day

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 @LauraPetrolino That's a really great point about the 'face' of the spokesperson. It's also then much easier afterward for a company to distance themselves from that person if they totally screw up.

1 year, 5 months ago on Three Things You Can Learn about Social Media from HMV

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 @LauraPetrolino  Oh my gosh, can I like this about 20 more times? I've made this same rant before, and likened the person posting to social media as a spokesperson holding daily press conferences. A smart company wouldn't send someone they didn't trust out to speak to the public via the (traditional) media, so why do they think it's ok to do via social? Apparently, they just don't see it as the same thing, which I Just. Don't. Get.

1 year, 5 months ago on Three Things You Can Learn about Social Media from HMV

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 @PattiRoseKnight I respectfully disagree with allowing 'junior' people posting for you. It is exactly because situations like this can and do happen that I strongly believe experienced communications professionals should be the only people authorized to post on your company's behalf on social media. It may seem expensive to pay trained professionals to update statuses or send tweets, but those same people should also be involved in strategy as well. That way when the poop hits the fan, the person/people in place to respond know the strategy, know communications and PR best practices, and are far less prone to overreaction or devolving into arguing with commenters. Just my own feelings on the matter, and I know now everyone agrees with me on this.

1 year, 5 months ago on Six Tips for Managing an Out-of-Control Social Media Crisis

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 @jennimacdonald I don't think you're exaggerating at all. I feel like if I didn't have my own distinct social media 'presence', I would be starting from scratch if I ever parted ways with my current employer.

 

The balance lies in my personal brand not interfering with my employer's brand, and me not letting my employer''s voice/message cross into my own. But for @ginidietrich and her topic here where the person and the business are essentially one and the same, that balance seems moot. 

1 year, 5 months ago on Two Reasons a Personal Brand is Imperative to Business Growth

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James, great post. I agree with you that a marketer probably doesn't want to plan for worst-case scenarios because of the thinking that if they create a good plan, they shouldn't need 'ejector seats'. But I'm not sure this will change any time soon, if ever. Part of it is that blurry line between ego and confidence, Clients (or bosses) are expecting the latter, based on recent results or a solid pitch. But also because of cost. It takes time to create good, thoughtful marketing campaigns, and time equals money. Spending even more time to think through how to appropriately (and dramatically, if it really is bombing) adjust or even ditch a campaign, and do it well, would take a lot more time. If enough clients/bosses demand it, we may see the day when marketers regularly engage in this kind of exercise, but unless that happens, I don't see it.

 

(In case this got lost in my comment, I do agree that a smart marketer WILL take the time to plan accordingly.)

1 year, 6 months ago on The Wisdom of Mike Tyson: Scenario Planning in Marketing

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 @jennimacdonald  @yvettepistorio Jenni, I can't wait to see this post you're talking about... I'd love to hear about what the analytics tell you about how and why posts performed the way they did, good or bad.

1 year, 7 months ago on Spam Sucks: The Fallout from Recent Facebook Changes

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Yvette, I found this a very helpful explanation of what changes there actually were, instead of the rampant rumors. Thanks so much for the useful info. 

 

Like Heather Tweedy's comment below, I too worry that once a user ignores fails to "Like" or comment on a couple of posts, they'll stop seeing them. I see posts all the time that I read and am glad I saw, but I don't always think to click Like or to comment. I see Facebook's point on reducing spam complaints, but I'm concerned that they're throwing out the baby with the bathwater.

1 year, 7 months ago on Spam Sucks: The Fallout from Recent Facebook Changes

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This is a great post, and near to my heart. I really came into my own in social media when I was laid off a couple of years ago, and in fact found my current job via a combination of in-person networking and Twitter. I tell people that Twitter changed my life, and finding this job was only one of those ways. It's the broader relationships I've built.Now I use those experiences to offer free social media tutoring to people from my church or other social circles who lose their jobs. As several people have pointed out here - it's about relationships. And I'd add the word genuine (@ginidietrich was right - you can spot the fakers): genuine relationships.I will certainly be sharing this post with some folks who could really use the help right now! 

1 year, 7 months ago on How Social Media Affects Your Job Search

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Thanks for this, and thanks especially for the extra write-up and links to several of my blog posts. I've been repeatedly touched by how much love and support I've gotten from Spin Sucks. @ginidietrich, you are good people. :)

1 year, 8 months ago on #FollowFriday: 2012 Recap

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 @ginidietrich

 I don't know. I honestly don't. Yes, the suddeness was awful. But I somtimes think it was a blessing I never had to watch her suffer through a terminal illness. Aimee's father died of cancer exactly a year prior, and I know how hard it was on the family to see him in pain, especially in those last couple of months. Bottom line, losing a loved one too early is never, ever easy.

1 year, 9 months ago on #FollowFriday: Gerald Hemphill

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Wow. Right now I am fighting back tears (if I wasn't sitting in a crowded Starbucks, I'd probably just let 'em go). Stories like this hit me so much harder now than they used to. Please, please, please pass on my condolences and best wishes to Misty and their children. And @ginidietrich, my condolences to you as well. A great friend really is a family member by love instead of blood, and I'm sure you're feeling this loss in a profound way.

1 year, 9 months ago on #FollowFriday: Gerald Hemphill

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 @Karl Sprague  Wow, thanks so much for the amazing compliment. That's probably the nicest thing I've heard all week. And it's been a good week, so that's saying something.

1 year, 9 months ago on #FollowFriday: Karl Sprague

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Happy Birthday @karlsprague! As my gift to you, I am now following you. I know, not much, but I didn't have much notice. :)

1 year, 9 months ago on #FollowFriday: Karl Sprague

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 @belllindsay  Well, maybe I LIKE dorks! :)

 

1 year, 10 months ago on #FollowFriday: Lindsay Bell

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I LOVE it when @ginidietrich tells me to follow someone I'm already following, because it makes me feel a lot smarter, like I already knew how cool @belllindsay was. Truth is, I think Lindsay followed me first, but that's neither here nor there, right?  As for @Lisa Gerber, I wish you the absolute best of luck in whatever it is you'll be doing next! To me, change is always a mix of excitement and fear, and I hope for you a huge dose of the former and very little of the latter.

1 year, 10 months ago on #FollowFriday: Lindsay Bell

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 @AnneReuss

 Aww, thanks! Although I can't take credit - Gini made me seem a lot more cool and interesting than I am in real life. :)

1 year, 11 months ago on #FollowFriday: Anne Reuss

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 @AnneReuss  @ginidietrich

 Duh! ALready following you!

1 year, 11 months ago on #FollowFriday: Anne Reuss

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 @AnneReuss, it is an absolute pleasure to meet you! I'm going to start following you on Twitter, because I do pretty much anything @ginidietrich tells me to do. (Just kidding, Gini!)

1 year, 11 months ago on #FollowFriday: Anne Reuss

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 @ElissaFreeman  I have nothing of great value to add, but did want to say I think your article makes some great points, and I've loved some of the comments below (especally by @MattLaCasse ). Thanks for such a well-written riff on a great topic, one which I believe is simply a magnified version of what is happening in journalism as we speak. 

1 year, 11 months ago on Social Media: The New Olympic Sport

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 @ginidietrich "And for cryin' out loud, why would I EVER want a personal telephone anywhere outside my own house?! Phone calls from my car? While waiting in line? No thank you!" :)

2 years ago on Online vs. Offline Relationships: Build Them Before You Need Them

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 @ginidietrich Thanks. I too have to remember not to let my jaw drop open when I hear people say that there's no real value in social media. I figure they're the same people who back in the 90's said the internet was a passing fad that had no real business use.

2 years ago on Online vs. Offline Relationships: Build Them Before You Need Them

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 @John_Murphy

Wow, thanks for the very kind words, John! 

2 years ago on Online vs. Offline Relationships: Build Them Before You Need Them

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@Lisa Gerber I knew what you meant. :) As I said before, this is a topic I feel very strongly about. Thanks so much to you and @ginidietrich for letting me share my views and experiences here.

2 years ago on Online vs. Offline Relationships: Build Them Before You Need Them

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 @annedreshfield It does seem like some people keep them separate in their minds, but I really feel like those people miss out on some incredibly enriching relationships that way. I have very dear friends now that would never have been part of my life if I had treated my online relationships with a more shallow approach. 

 

Anyway, thanks so much for reading and commenting on the post.

2 years ago on Online vs. Offline Relationships: Build Them Before You Need Them

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 @KenMueller I love how you say you built those relationships because you just  'didn't know any better'. I was exactly the same way. I never anticipated I'd 'need' those relationships, I just treated people well, like PEOPLE, and relationships were formed. I think too many social media users see others as followers or fans, and not as people. And I think those poor folks are truly missing out on the richness social media can bring.

 

Thanks for sharing your views!

2 years ago on Online vs. Offline Relationships: Build Them Before You Need Them

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 @NancyD68 Well said! I like how you referred to your online 'friends' instead of followers - that's the critical difference!

2 years ago on Online vs. Offline Relationships: Build Them Before You Need Them

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 @kmsandrbs Thanks for sharing, Robert. These are just two of what I''m sure are countless examples of people coming through for others, facilitated by social media.

2 years ago on Online vs. Offline Relationships: Build Them Before You Need Them

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 @ginidietrich True, you really can't control what is said. But how you present yourself to others provides the foundation for that discussion. That's why, especially for brands, developing a strong identity (intentionally) and a base of fans/customers that positively relate to it can be so important. They become a piece of your brand, and can engage in those conversations on your behalf, both good and bad. The brand takes on a greater life.

2 years, 1 month ago on Four Steps to Create Your Personal Brand

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I love this topic. I had the good fortune of hearing two different people speak on this right after I was laid off from my job two years ago. It completely reshaped how I approached my job search, and I've continued to apply these principals to how I manage my online and offline identity ever since. Thanks for continuing to share with people the importance this can have on their lives, especially in the new job reality.

2 years, 1 month ago on Four Steps to Create Your Personal Brand

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 @ExtremelyAvg Not only did I feel like you made a good point, but it was funny and fun to read. Thanks for brightening my day while educating me!

2 years, 1 month ago on Conducting Surveys: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

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 @ginidietrich  @Frank_Strong I think those are two separate questions though: should you or shouldn't you allow comments on your blog. Like you said, Gini, that's up to the blogger. But for those who DO allow comments, I'd say that if you want more, one of the things you can do to help that is to respond to the comments you do get. (Of course, content worth commenting on is critical!)

2 years, 1 month ago on Why you should comment on blogs

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 @Frank_Strong  @ginidietrich Good idea! One other thing i forgot to mention that I thought while reading this. Not all bloggers are as good as you and Gini about responding to the comments they do get. If you want people to comment, you have to acknowledge them when they do. Not only because it makes people feel heard and valued, but also because it adds to the blog post from its original form. This is a perfect example. My initial comment has resulted in additional dialog about the post. That's potentially more content for your readers. Same with other comments left by other people that you've responded to. If you didn't make the effort to respond to comments, not only would people miss feeling appreciated for their input, but all readers would possibly lose out on additional content that makes the whole better than what you started with when you hit 'Publish'.

2 years, 1 month ago on Why you should comment on blogs

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 @ginidietrich smart aleck...  ;)

2 years, 1 month ago on Why you should comment on blogs

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Like others have said, thanks for the reminder. I do try to comment on blogs, but I really feel like I have to have something original to contribute to the conversation to get me to post something. Given all the smart people writing and commenting, I can get intimidated by my own perceived lack of knowledge or perspective. 

 

As for @ginidietrich , I know exactly how she does it. She really listens to what people say, and then gives a thoughtful response. That is a rare gift in this day and age (because it takes a LOT more time), but it is one anyone can master. Gini, thanks for inspiring me to be better. :)

2 years, 1 month ago on Why you should comment on blogs

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 @Lisa Gerber  Lisa, I did get your email and will contact you a little later today. Thank you!

 

2 years, 2 months ago on #FollowFriday: Pat Rhoads

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 @bradmarley  @ginidietrich

 Thanks Brad. It has been a great outlet, and I know it must be resonating with people because I've been overwhelmed at the strong following it has garnered. 

2 years, 2 months ago on #FollowFriday: Pat Rhoads

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All I can say is 'wow'. Thanks so much for the honor of being recommended, for all the very kind words about my 'Missing Aimee' blog. I can't express just how touched I am and how much this means to me, especially as I hope to use that blog to offer some kind of help or hope to others in similar situations.

2 years, 2 months ago on #FollowFriday: Pat Rhoads

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@ginidietrich I assume you're referring to the "Missing Aimee" blog? And yes, I would love to write a guest post for your blog. Maybe we can exchange a few DMs and nail down the details?

2 years, 2 months ago on Is Facebook Making Us Lonely?

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 @ginidietrich

Oh wow, thanks. I would have loved to have co-written a post about this topic with you. Maybe some other time - I have strong feelings about how people interact online versus offline (in case you couldn't tell!). And yes, social media has practically saved my life the last five months.

2 years, 2 months ago on Is Facebook Making Us Lonely?

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I think the answer to the title question lies at the root of how people use Facebook or any other social channel. I lost my wife to a boating accident late last year, and between the blog I started and being connected to people via Facebook and Twitter, I have found a huge community of support. In other words, I am FAR less lonely than I would have been had this happened even 5-6 years ago.

 

For me it boils down to HOW I interact with people, online or off. Quality interaction breeds quality relationships. Shallow interactions will not create real relationship, and in times when people need that real connection, it won't be there. I'm sure we can remember people who, even before social media, seemed popular and to have lots of friends only to find during trials that they seemed to suddenly have no one there. Social media may amplify that and make it possible for more people to be in that situation, but it's not the cause, IMHO.

2 years, 2 months ago on Is Facebook Making Us Lonely?

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Aww, what a nice post for your hubby. Happy Birthday Kelly!

2 years, 2 months ago on #FollowFriday: Kelly Dietrich

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Really freaking good article! With the title I was expecting something pretty funny. Tis was funny, but not in a cartoonish sort of way. It was funny in a "oh yeah, I know people like THAT" sort of way. Which actually was better. I'm totally sharing this - some people on Twitter need to read this...

2 years, 8 months ago on Social Media Charlatans Are Like Wile E. Coyote

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