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@danielnewmanUV It's actual quite difficult to aggregate social data. Google for instance cannot access most Facebook content and Twitter makes it difficult, too. Of course, you would never be able to get data from Google about your search history. But by allowing Klout permission to "score" their social networks (and you can associate your Bing account too, which makes them privy to your search as well), users volunteer all of this data that can then be associated to them. Of course Klout scores are arbitrary and meaningless, the fact that many people sign up to discover these scores is the engine behind this data collection. I'm pretty sure that this wasn't the intended purpose of Klout, but I'm also pretty sure this is why it's valuable. To your point, Kred does the same exact thing except that they aren't as big relative to Klout and don't have a search partnership. 


The reason aggregated social data is valuable incidentally can be demonstrated by how credit card companies use purchase data to determine credit risk and profitability. They can key in on certain purchases that predict the likelihood that a person will miss a payment (and thus be more profitable). Visa and Mastercard don't make businesses privy to their data, though - so there is a market for social data, the question is whether Klout can build a large enough opt-in audience to make this viable to sell (I think, anyhow).

5 months, 1 week ago on Klout Acquired: Should We Care?

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Hi Daniel - I hadn't seen that Klout was acquired, but it's not surprising. With the "influence" framework that you suggest, Klout's value seems unwarranted, but I'm not sure that Klout scores have anything directly to do with why Klout could be valuable. 


Klout entices people to reveal their aggregated social activity (and search via Bing) in a single repository. Therefore, it can provide a data mine that most social platforms (even CRM solutions) can't match. Because the social platforms likely won't ever cooperate with one another, and because platform APIs don't give the level of detail that direct access provides, there is a big opportunity for Klout if they can coerce enough people to participate in the gamification and other goodies that they offer, they can be a gateway for social and search data. 


I agree with you that the front end of Klout is of negligible value, but the back end could be a blue ocean.

5 months, 2 weeks ago on Klout Acquired: Should We Care?

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Hi Gini, I read Lean In with serious apprehension after reading through the negative reviews and I really loved this book. Of course I'm not the target audience, but I thought that the perspective that she gave of the societal and business pressures that women face in the workplace was powerful and important. And I also thought that her fearlessness to solicit and receive feedback was pretty inspiring and added a lot to the richness of her insight. Thanks for writing this - I hope it inspires more people to read the book.

11 months ago on Lean In: Inspiring, Empowering, and Why You Should Read It

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Great insights Steve, I noticed that they just added a feature with manual follow back where they recommend two people to you every time you follow one person, so the process is much more onerous that just the lack of automation. 

1 year ago on Twitter Fails, Changes TOS and Outlaws Automated Follow Back

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@ginidietrichThanks Gini - that's very kind of you to say and I appreciate the opportunity to contribute to Spin Sucks!

1 year, 1 month ago on Social Sharing Initiatives: Mobilize your Employees!

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@KevinVandever You're kidding - IFTTT for lights? That's awesome. When IFTTT first came out I knew there was possibility there but resisted digging into it for a long time, and finally just did it. I worry about how they'll monetize the tool in the future, but for now I just continue to integrate. I'm going to have to check out those lights! 

1 year, 1 month ago on Social Sharing Initiatives: Mobilize your Employees!

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@yvettepistorio Thanks so much Yvette! I appreciate your feedback!

1 year, 1 month ago on Social Sharing Initiatives: Mobilize your Employees!

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@Suze Carragher Thanks Suze, I think an ownership mentality is key. You can't force anyone to share your stuff, but if they feel that they have a vested interest in your success, and the content reflects well on them I think it's a reasonable proposition to ask for shares. @maerskline is an example of a business that has done an extraordinary job on-boarding a very large organization and affiliated network.

1 year, 1 month ago on Social Sharing Initiatives: Mobilize your Employees!

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@samfiorella I'm flexible either way, but Chicago to Toronto = 7 hours 53 mins (not counting border security), Chicago to Cinci = 4 hours 33 mins, so maybe we could compromise for the sake of @ginidietrich's convenience and I could act as your proxy? 

1 year, 1 month ago on Social Sharing Initiatives: Mobilize your Employees!

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@Suze Carragher Thanks Suze!

1 year, 1 month ago on Social Sharing Initiatives: Mobilize your Employees!

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@Howie Goldfarb Thanks, Howie. I suppose it depends, I've worked places that this would work and some that wouldn't. I expect it has a lot to do with the amount of ownership employees felt for the company's success. I also think that employees should have a stake in content creation, so I think there are things that can be done to increase the "ties" (incidentally. strong versus weak ties are determined as a measure of time spent together). Appreciate your insight.

1 year, 1 month ago on Social Sharing Initiatives: Mobilize your Employees!

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@samfiorella Thanks Sam - I hope I didn't imply that automation like this is a strategy. It's simply a tactic to increase awareness for social media campaigns. I certainly don't think that implementing any of these in isolation would be especially helpful. :)

1 year, 1 month ago on Social Sharing Initiatives: Mobilize your Employees!

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Thanks Dennis - I think you're spot on in your analysis of infographics in general, but I take a more nuanced position on its relevance to the greater good. 

 

Nearly every statistic online is wrong. Some people are massaging data (as you point out in this piece), sometimes people are making broad-based assumptions that don't show correlation, but mostly people just don't have a representative sample set to draw a broad conclusion from. So, you can sharpshoot nearly every data-based infographic that's out there if you choose to. It's a pretty fruitless pursuit, though: infographics are hugely popular (otherwise I wouldn't bother with them).

 

I think it's important that you mention Ann Handley and Joe Pulizzi,too. Because while I agree that they are both extraordinary subject matter experts I think they are self-aware enough to know their data isn't absolute. Their expertise comes from understanding trends and best practices and being able to communicate these tactics to businesses that want to market themselves better. And that's my aspiration as well.

 

So, if you get bogged down by the specific data that goes into the 90% - you may miss the bigger picture which is that content marketing is widespread, that large chunks of budget are being spent on it and the different ways that people are creating content. That should be the takeaway from a piece like that.

 

I agree with your point on data to a point, but 90% of something nebulous is no different than 110% of something nebulous or 0%. It's incumbent on the reader to judge the reliability of the data to their situation and respond appropriately.

 

My two cents. Cheers!

1 year, 2 months ago on Social media infographics: fight data fudge!

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Boat rocker. :) It's a really good point given the demographics of social media users both domestically and internationally, Margie. I don't mean to diminish these lists but I tend to concur with Malcolm Gladwell when he wrote about our silly obsession with lists. In one example, a Michigan judge asked lawyers to rank law schools by esteem. Penn State was ranked around the middle despite the fact that there is no law school at Penn State. You're high on my list, and that matters.... to me. :) 

1 year, 2 months ago on Is Social Media Really Homogeneous White Milk?

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@ErinMFeldman You need to migrate to Feedly. It will transfer all of your feeds from Reader. Don't worry about bookmarking this though, it was so well received I'm going to make a habit of posting love letters to you for all of my guest posts! :) 

1 year, 3 months ago on Things I Learned From Erin Feldman

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@bdorman264 37? I feel like someone should acknowledge your persistence, Bill. :) 

1 year, 3 months ago on Things I Learned From Erin Feldman

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Erin Feldman is the unattainable ideal of writing excellence. Whoever wrote this piece got it spot on. Great piece.

1 year, 3 months ago on Things I Learned From Erin Feldman

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Is there any way for me to reconcile the fact that I love your point about generic LinkedIn requests, but am a closeted fan of drum circles?

1 year, 4 months ago on The Bitch Slap: Stop Being a Jackass With Your LinkedIn Requests

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@profkrg "Don't be subtle" is my new mantra.... @mssackstein @shonali

1 year, 4 months ago on What Compels People to Share Your Content?

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@LaceyLuxx Thanks Oly!  Loved your piece on the Harlem Shake. It does seem everyone's gone a bit mad... 

1 year, 5 months ago on What Compels People to Share Your Content?

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@waterloobikes Chris, about your expectations for this post: My opinion (influenced by different research) is that you have to pay to build a community, pay to reduce barriers, you must understand Facebook's EdgeRank and Twitter filtering as the standard for social monetization, build an email list as fast as you possibly can to diminish those costs, understand that 99-9-1 is probably more like 85% of the community didn't see a post because the social network didn't show it to them, 14% may have seen it and taken no action, and less that 1% took some action. I don't really know off the top of my head of any research on community values. The biggest takeaway that I can offer for a business of your size would be the importance of an email list - it is opened more often, and is the most effective digital means of getting repeat business (incidentally AdWords is one of the most effective means to get new business). If any of that is helpful or if I can provide you more detail about any of that, contact me off site and I'm happy to share what I can.

1 year, 5 months ago on What Compels People to Share Your Content?

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@waterloobikes No worries about snark and I appreciate you taking the time to share find and post those articles. There are many different opinions and I respect yours, but I'll also point out to that I run a site that had 100K visitors last year and will likely have a quarter of a million this year, so while my observations are limited to that (relatively small) audience I don't consider them platitudes (platitude is a trite, meaningless, biased, or prosaic statement often presented as if it were significant and original). Again, no hard feelings here and hope you don't feel that I diminished your point of view.

1 year, 5 months ago on What Compels People to Share Your Content?

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@waterloobikes I've read all of Chris Anderson and Seth Godin's books and I don't think the conclusions of this research are incongruent. What I'm discussing is virality in a general sense. Sure, if you're an active part of a community with similar interests you may share more within the community at the expense of sharing somewhere else - but you also won't share content that isn't acceptable within that community. And you may be able to talk politics and religion within a certain group but the likelihood that your conversation will significantly grow from your tribe is low. I don't mean this disrespectfully at all, but "The internet is the death knoll for mass marketing" is a platitude with no basis in reality. There's good evidence that Dunbar's number is valid for social ties as well, so common interest in a "tribe" is much different than your capability to influence that tribe. Just because you are one of thousands doesn't mean that you have the capability to influence them. What social networks have given mass marketers a capability to do is to segment better, but saying that mass marketing is dead is like saying that an Etsy store and a mass-manufactured jeweler have an equal playing field.   They do not. When Chris Anderson described the long tail of the internet, his point was that it made niche things accessible and not that it was going to make niche products mainstream. Some people like to share anecdotal stories of individual success to controvert evidence-based findings and to tell people to "join a vibrant community," and from my point of view that is fine so long as it isn't intended to advise others on a course of action. For me, research and data are important, but I respect your experience and appreciate your comment!  (post-script, I reposted this comment after noticing I wrote virility instead of virality, which of course is an entirely different post)

1 year, 5 months ago on What Compels People to Share Your Content?

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@ariana fernandez I have heard that 96.5% of the time you can't go wrong agreeing with @Shonali, but I don't recall the source of that research... :D  Thanks for reading and for your comment! 

1 year, 5 months ago on What Compels People to Share Your Content?

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@Kristen Hicks Well now we know each other and I appreciate your note!

1 year, 5 months ago on What Compels People to Share Your Content?

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@Shonali Agreed.  There should be a better word for this kind of selfishness. If I spent more time studying for the fifth grade spelling bee I might be able to suggest one! 

1 year, 5 months ago on What Compels People to Share Your Content?

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@jennimacdonald Thanks Jenni - appreciate the support from one former Seattleite to another! 

1 year, 5 months ago on What Compels People to Share Your Content?

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@3HatsComm Thanks Davina, I think that viewpoint is worth a lot. Everyone may not be able to go "viral" but they can at least maximize the impact of their message for their audience. Great comment - thank you!

1 year, 5 months ago on What Compels People to Share Your Content?

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@Wittlake Thanks Eric, I tried to follow the same line of thought as you did. My expectation is that in aggregate behavior would scale more or less. Bear in mind that the research I pointed out was of advertising content only. However, I assume sharing behavior is agnostic of message and would remain static as well. I suspect YouTube is probably mature enough as a platform that something seismic would have to happen to increase time on site or sharing behavior - so my best guess is that the percentage of content that goes viral. But my best guess and five bucks might get you a bacon topped maple bar at Voodoo Donuts....

1 year, 5 months ago on What Compels People to Share Your Content?

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Thanks @HowieG - this is one of those social media topics where people have very different expectations than capabilities. A social media lottery of sorts! :D  Thanks for the great comment and for your nice words.

1 year, 5 months ago on What Compels People to Share Your Content?

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Nice to see you Carrie - let me just chime in to say that I don't think you have to like Vine!  :)  

1 year, 5 months ago on Video: Practicing What I Preach

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Great post, Frederic.  My experience with Graph Search was very similar to yours - robust results for broad subjects but very disappointing results for anything so specific as a restaurant recommendation.  It shows a huge gap between Facebook users and social signals.  I'm glad you brought up Foursquare, because I think they are the huge winners in Graph Search.  They are probably going to sell this year because they can't raise any more money, but they do have a much more robust set of social signals than Facebook does.  So would Facebook buy these to amp up Graph Search and would Google try to prevent Facebook from that data?  I like that we are able to talk about these possibilities, despite the fact that Graph Search is unrealized a this point.  Cheers!

1 year, 6 months ago on Is Facebook’s Graph Search A Foursquare-Killer?

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Hi Sam!  @AmyMccTobin pinged me about this post and I totally agree.  There is such a rich and dynamic body of knowledge around social media, and many people are so skillful about navigating and making inroads in these channels that it shocks me when people are summarily dismissive of a lot of people's expertise.  I used to have a sergeant in the army that loved to share that there are "many ways to skin a rabbit," and though I don't know that first hand, I try to keep my critiques of rabbit skinning to a minimum!  Great post.

1 year, 6 months ago on I Declare Open Season On Social Media Experts: Closed.

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 @belllindsay You laugh (out loud), but I found it really insightful and doubt that I'm the only person (at least judging from the comments and my spider sense).  I think it's a pretty special insight to elaborate on the value that Facebook offers its users when a lot of people are scouring the internets to find the next big thing.  It puts in perspective my futile quest to assemble fellow Ke$ha fans in the new MySpace.... 

1 year, 7 months ago on Reflections on Change: Why I Left Twitter for Facebook

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Awesome insights, Lindsay (as usual!)  I think it's really interesting not only to hear your perspective but also Margie, Susie and Gini (all favorites!).  I wonder if maybe there is a shift for early-adopters back to Facebook?

1 year, 7 months ago on Reflections on Change: Why I Left Twitter for Facebook

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This is such a great insight, Lindsay!  There's a paper out by some analyst suggesting that ten years from now the workplace will be much more egalitarian because of social media, and I think that's a pretty preposterous statement for the reasons that you describe.  I think a lot of people have had opportunity to work for someone with the same leadership qualities (though slightly less fabulous) than Gini, but every remarkable boss there are a lot of dirtbags.  I didn't realize you were working for AD now, but clearly human resources is high among Gini's many talents! 

1 year, 7 months ago on Dear Manager: You Might Need a Tuneup

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@Nicole Ha!  Wish that were us, but it is a picture from the creative commons. If it were me you'd have seen a dangling cigarette from my dad's lip, my sister pulling each other's hair, me in my husky pants and a cheesy grin.  :) 

1 year, 8 months ago on How Facebook Could Become Irrelevant

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@audaciouslady Thanks for that great comment!  I was just talking to a teacher friend of mine and we were discussing how he was on the cutting edge of technology and trends because of his everyday interactions with students.  I think this generation is going to very exciting and I'm really interested to see how their proclivities and technological aptitude shape their behaviors as they grow older.

1 year, 8 months ago on How Facebook Could Become Irrelevant

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@maryanneconlin Thanks Maryanne!  I didn't intend to be sensational about relevance at all, but should have qualified that I mean it as generationally irrelevant.  People (most prominently Kathy Savitt, who I mention above) describe Gen M having quite a different perception of Facebook than maybe you or I have. I think Facebook may be looked upon in ten or fifteen years as Yahoo is now.  Of course, I am the world's worst futurist - but I think there is mounting evidence of Facebook having an insurmountable struggle for Gen M.  Thanks for your comment!

1 year, 8 months ago on How Facebook Could Become Irrelevant

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@katmtaylor Maybe my mom and your mom could be Facebook friends?

1 year, 8 months ago on How Facebook Could Become Irrelevant

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Thanks Shonali for allowing me to contribute, and let me just say how grateful I am that my mom didn't comment on this post!

1 year, 8 months ago on How Facebook Could Become Irrelevant

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@LouT4 That's a fantastic insight, Lou.  I think it's just like anything else - the more complicated it is to do the less people will do it.  In one of my career paths I managed a manufacturing facility and the degree that we could control quality and manage costs was proportional to how easy we make our process. I think the same efficiencies are true with social media.  My personal opinion is that Google Plus has the easiest privacy controls of any social network - yet that doesn't seem to be enough of an allure to attract Gen M users.  So my thought it that as easy as you can make privacy controls, it's much easier to take the conversation to another platform.  And that's why I think you see a generational shift from Facebook to other platforms.  I also think that Facebook showed some shrewd strategy acquiring Instagram but I wonder if at 100M users if that might be too big for the future.  It's interesting to see how the multitasked generation responds differently to technology than fossils like me, and I think understanding their mindset a little better will probably give a better sense of how the social landscape will shift.  Great insight and comment.

1 year, 8 months ago on How Facebook Could Become Irrelevant

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@lifeisbetter Thanks for your comment.  I don't get a great sense that FB does too much altruistic work - particularly since they went public.  I think keeping Instagram (which they own) separate from Facebook may have been a way to try and grow a younger demographic, but I'm not sure that exclusivity is an easy fix.  If it were Google Plus would have caught on much faster than it did.  Keep an eye on Yahoo - their CMO Kathy Savitt is one of the big thinkers about this generational gap and the perception of kids towards these networks.  It will be interesting to see how Yahoo's products start to reflect these perceptions.  Great comment - thank you!

1 year, 8 months ago on How Facebook Could Become Irrelevant

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@tressalynne Great insight, Tressa!   A study came out this week about Gen M that found that these kids have more devices personally than an entire household did a decade ago.  So I think that duplicate accounts are probably just the tip of the iceberg.  I suspect that cybermonitoring will be a growth industry as my kids get old enough for social evasion.  Thanks so much for reading and commenting!

1 year, 8 months ago on How Facebook Could Become Irrelevant

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@AmyMccTobin Thanks Amy!  I think if you take a look at the age demographics for Twitter, even it is not the social network of choice for Gen M (Facebook median age is just over 40, Twitter just under).  Tumblr is the biggest and Instagram is (I believe) the largest growing - though a lot of that growth is in ages that aren't old enough to have an account so it's hard to measure.  When you think in aggregate for these networks, I think you have to consider the easiest path.  For instance is it easier to set up Circles on Google Plus or just to meet on Pheed?  The filters and blocks need to be more intuitive than they are... but even then what would that look like and would it still be easier just to meet someplace else?  I think Facebook may be more analogous to Yahoo in that it will retain a user base that will be formidable but will age, I don't expect it will have as precipitous a decline as MySpace, but I also submit that the new MySpace may be a more welcoming platform for Gen M users than Facebook.  It's all speculative of course, but thinking of social networks from a generational standpoint rather than from the perspective of agnostic growth and attrition makes more sense to me.  Great insight - I may plagiarize your only Facebook can kill Facebook line... please don't sue!  :) 

1 year, 8 months ago on How Facebook Could Become Irrelevant

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What an inspired choice!  I wish I were in DC to see it in person, Shonali!  Congratulations!

1 year, 8 months ago on An Apology, A Wish and An Adventure

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Frank - great insight.  Ad Age ran an article a few months back showing that something like 70% of traditional media marketing isn't measured for profitability, so I think that the measurability of social media combined with the investment necessary to succeed at scale makes it far more scrutinized.  Nice article!

1 year, 9 months ago on Does social media marketing get more scrutiny?

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@barrettrossie @Soulati | B2B Social Media Marketing Me, too!  There must be an ifttt channel for that! 

1 year, 10 months ago on The Secret to Writing the Perfect Headline

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@Soulati | B2B Social Media Marketing That's awesome.... though I suppose if you got in the habit of posting titillating pictures on your website it could become something else entirely! :)  Great insight and example!! 

1 year, 10 months ago on The Secret to Writing the Perfect Headline

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