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Next time, you and Jeff should invite me along.  I just made pork belly for dinner last night!

4 months, 1 week ago on Tasty Salted Pig Parts

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I have a Tuft and Needle mattress at my office for afternoon naps, and it is awesome. (Full disclosure: They gave it to me for free to get my honest opinion)  Super comfortable, and a lot easier to fold than a traditional mattress.


I have both a $3,000 Tempurpedic as well as some cheapo IKEA mattresses, and this is better than both.

5 months, 2 weeks ago on With Tuft & Needle, two software developers take aim at the bloated mattress industry

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Hey, now that the Daves have weighed in, where's Arrington?  Mike ought to be all over this.

11 months, 3 weeks ago on Let’s start a fight on the Internet

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Seed funding has been forever altered, but scaling up companies still requires large amounts of capital.  The VC model will still be relevant for companies that get beyond the seed stage.

11 months, 3 weeks ago on This chart shows the future of venture capital

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I applaud your transparency and willingness to share the numbers. Of course, it helps that Greycroft 1's performance has been outstanding!

2 years, 6 months ago on A New Take On Series A

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Awesome story. And it emphasizes the importance of "doing work" as an investor. Investing isn't just about picking companies and writing checks.

3 years, 1 month ago on The Making of Lytro

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@carterac I wouldn't engage in such behavior, but there are plenty of VCs who would view a decision to not block a competitor's funding as a major strategic mistake. None of us have any idea what kind of shareholder pressure Like might have been under at that point.

3 years, 3 months ago on The investment that didn't happen

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@manukumar What Like.com did wasn't nice, but it was in the best interests of its shareholders. They viewed their patent as an asset and Modista as a threat. Killing Modista's round (while reprehensible) reinforced the value of their asset and took out a competitor. I can think of plenty of investors who would be upset if a portfolio company passed up that opportunity.

3 years, 3 months ago on The investment that didn't happen

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Excellent story, though an upsetting outcome. You can't blame Like.com either, since they too have a fiduciary responsibility to fulfill to their shareholders. The blame lies firmly with the broken patent system that allows these overly broad patents to issue to begin with.

3 years, 3 months ago on The investment that didn't happen

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@margaretweigel @michelletripp Age is only one factor, and far from the largest one in determining whether someone can be innovative. But it is not a coincidence that most revolutionary work is done by the young. I'm not terribly happy about it either--I'm also on the wrong side of the divide. But I can't pretend that I'm as plugged into youth culture as my younger peers.

3 years, 8 months ago on The 30 percent rule: innovation calls for 20-somethings

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@michelletripp Ageism is bad, but it contains a kernel of truth. The young and old are different. Not necessarily better or worse, but different.

Just as I wouldn't count on a 45-year-old to generate new ideas about how young people might interact, I wouldn't count on a 25-year-old to understand the nuances of when to pitch that idea to the client and when to let it bake a bit further.

The answer is not to ignore the age factor, it's to embrace it and let each group leverage its respective strengths.

3 years, 8 months ago on The 30 percent rule: innovation calls for 20-somethings

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Youth has always been part of the equation for Silicon Valley. When you think back about the great companies (Google, Apple, etc.,) almost all were started by founders in their 20s (and note that both Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg were 19 when they dropped out of Harvard to found Microsoft and Facebook).

This isn't to say that we should chuck experience out the window--all of the same examples benefited from experienced leaders like Bill Campbell, Sheryl Sandberg, etc. And Apple achieved its greatest heights when an older and wiser Steve Jobs returned from exile.

If you want to try something different, 20somethings are far more likely to give you what you're looking for.

3 years, 8 months ago on The 30 percent rule: innovation calls for 20-somethings

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Content, content, content. People have already shelled out for HD; the only reason to go for 3D is if there is killer content that drives the switch. It's not clear there's enough killer 3D content yet.

Sports is the killer app for HD; could it be the killer app for 3D as well? I'm not convinced yet (but might change my mind when I get to see Monday Night Football in 3D).

4 years, 4 months ago on Does anyone really care about 3D TV?

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Writing that has been polished for years should be of higher quality than something dashed off in 10 seconds.

4 years, 4 months ago on Is fiction still relevant to a culture's sense of self? Has it really been replaced by Twitter, the web and instant?

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