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@jeffespo @AmyVernon I am in the South and am pretty sure nature and science apply to me but I am not a man so that may be why. Heh

1 year, 7 months ago on Goodbye Republican Party, It’s YOU Not Me

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@juliepippert Trying to flesh out your imaginary character - so pop that bubble why don't you LOL. ;) I think you have to take each candidate on merit and choose by position and record. I've never straight party ticket voted in my life.

1 year, 7 months ago on Goodbye Republican Party, It’s YOU Not Me

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Well done and well said. I think it shows tremendous courage and courage of conviction to stick to your morals, ethics and ideals rather than compromising to fit with a group. Good for you so calmly and matter of factly explaining why, too.

1 year, 7 months ago on Goodbye Republican Party, It’s YOU Not Me

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 @stevenmcoyle It needn't be a woman thing and I say that as a woman who was really hoping for more progressive leadership from younger, female and other out of the box type executives. It does need to be a structural issue of workplaces issue. because BOY do we have one and it affects men and women alike. Some of the top talent opts out of the traditional workforce because it can't support them

1 year, 9 months ago on Yahoo! Letter: Was Their Communications Team Consulted?

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 @HowieG  @JoeCardillo  @SteelToad  @danielnewmanUV My solution to challenges at my home office is to use the library. They have private rooms you can pre-book and free wifi. Coffee shops can be good but noisy. I can sit totally focused and hammer out a lot of work in those library offices. I can also do skype calls etc. OT but just wanted to mention.

1 year, 9 months ago on Yahoo! Letter: Was Their Communications Team Consulted?

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 @belllindsay You know what I think is better leadership? A 3 month window: here are our new performance standards and expectations, here's why (rah rah rally, let's succeed), here are the ways we're setting you up to succeed, and here's the outcome for not meeting or exceeding. Along the way, constant way points of review, how is it going. It sets a high bar for management and workers alike, but sets a supportive, enable to succeed culture. if people feel like they're on a team, they'll work their hearts out (a lot of people will, not all). If they feel like minions on a wheel, they'll resent the higher ups.

1 year, 9 months ago on Yahoo! Letter: Was Their Communications Team Consulted?

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1. The better letter.

I think your letter was a lot better on many levels but I think it presumes that the company has a healthy morale and people are feeling loyal. Having worked in dysfunctional companies that asked for a lot of sacrifice and loyalty of employees' with little return on that investment, I can say a lot of employees rarely are able to muster up the rah rah. They are just trying to make it until they can shake it. I don't know if this is Yahoo! but from whispers here and there I think it might be possible.

 

2. Feminism, sexism, whateverism.

I think a lot of us hope to see progressive and innovative business solutions from younger CEOs like this, and (mea culpa) I admit to thinking a lot more highly of women in this hope. So to me, that's the only way it's a "woman" thing. It's not about feminism -- it's about hoping that when you get someone "out of the box" into the C-Suite, they'll bring fresher ideas that just might keep the boat afloat. Then downstream, that helps the company, employees and overall economy.

 

3. Remote and flex workers.

Whenever I hear "time to pull in employees" I feel like that a slacker copout business fix. It's a kneejerk reaction I admit. But I've done it successfully and know it's not just me who has to be stellar -- the manager has to be able to manage it too. So if the workers aren't working, that's one thing. But to blame bad business on flex workers sounds suspicious because I know a lot of great ones. Too many times I see bad management leading to poor conditions for workers. So do I think this is wise? I don't know. But I am skeptical.

 

1 year, 9 months ago on Yahoo! Letter: Was Their Communications Team Consulted?

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 @belllindsay It's not just you. Me too. :)

1 year, 9 months ago on Yahoo! Letter: Was Their Communications Team Consulted?

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 @DallasK Dollars to donuts that decision was deliberate, thought through and done to insulate Marisa. Sets up a different fall guy -- or so the thinking often goes.

1 year, 9 months ago on Yahoo! Letter: Was Their Communications Team Consulted?

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Will comment later after I finish laughing and clapping with one hand.

1 year, 9 months ago on For the Love of Spam

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So much breadth and depth of useful info!

1 year, 9 months ago on The Hashtag Bowl

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We have long lived in a society that expected responsible production and responsible consumption. Court cases, regulations, and consumer choice consistently back up this culture. To ignore one and lay all accountability on the other is short-sighted. Bob's advice was spot on. I truly wish that this had been taken as an opportunity rather than a miss. The benefit, nevertheless, was a reminder to be careful.

1 year, 10 months ago on Storify and Facebook Privacy Breaches: How NOT to Respond

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Heidi is the total embodiment of awesome and inspiring!

1 year, 11 months ago on #FollowFriday: Heidi Massey

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 @Liz Well that's a point to ponder because after a conference today I drove a friend to the airport, someone I met by building community and we talked about tribes. We talked about how life transitions sometimes bring tribe transitions, especially when cancer disrupts life. It was a deep, complex talk. So that's where my head is on it right now.

 

I think it takes a village, not just to raise a child but to develop and support a life. Each of us builds and experiences community differently -- some for a long or life time, some for shorter term -- and either way, they are valuable. We have the community we are born into and the community we choose. Some people are brilliant at building community in which they are the center, and some are brilliant at building community as a connector. We really laud the former, and I think it's important to value the latter too, even if they end up more peripheral.

2 years, 2 months ago on Wednesday Bubble: Team Brilliant

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Done and done.

2 years, 2 months ago on Wednesday Bubble: Team Brilliant

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begas = begs

2 years, 4 months ago on A fresh look at brand Canada. What do you think?

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I think it's funny -- when done well -- these stereotypes. But -- and maybe the Canadians should sit down, don't need any injuries here -- you guys don't fly as far under the radar as you think you do. Global business, global arts and literature, and the great global boundary hopper (the Internet) have kind of...opened boundaries. We know more about you than you think we do.

 

So the whole "ignorant American" and "America needs to be educated" begas the very real question of "based on WHAT" and how is that evidentiary enough to build an entire campaign around?

 

When I first saw this campaign, also from Dave, my comment was:

 

It's very clever. The concept and angle, plus visuals, are cool.

 

A few questions:

 

1. What is the chief purpose? Tourism? If so, it seemed a little focused in this presentation on people, and truth is, I come for places or experiences when I travel. Perhaps the campaign has less Bieber and peanut butter and more Montreal, Toronto art fest and Victoria.

 

Credit?

 

Reputation?

 

2. When they say America, do they mean US, or the continent?

 

FWIW, maybe it's me (my sister lived in Toronto for years and I worked for a company based there for a while, we traveled to Quebec quite a bit, etc.) and just my friends but I think we do know quite a bit about Canada beyond hockey and syrup. One thing I didn't notice in this campaign (as I skimmed it) was a big heads-up on your chief Canadian advocates: popular writers who are spreading Canadian culture worldwide, such as Louise Penny. Writers and artists are cultural advocates without boundaries. I learned more about Quebecois separatism from Louise Penny books than anywhere. And it made me go look it up, see if what she wrote was all true and it was.

2 years, 4 months ago on A fresh look at brand Canada. What do you think?

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Danny, excellent advice and points here. So very sorry you had to make them. Very upsetting. I wish you , your family and business the best.

2 years, 4 months ago on Facebook Hacking and the Value of Social Currency

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 @DenVan Wow I did not know that about Cru (formerly Campus Crusade for Christ). My mind goes straight to fine wines. Not Jesus. Although, upon closer thinking, fine wines and Jesus are actually related so maybe that one is quite clever. Unintentionally.

 

Otherwise, I absolutely agree about names. They need to be accurate and descriptive.

 

Also glad I could help (and flattered to be included) clarify one teeny portion of the very confusing Texas state government.

2 years, 5 months ago on Railroaded! 10 misleading brand names.

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Love the rundown and I honestly did not realize that is what Counts meant! Wish I could be there!

2 years, 5 months ago on Technology? Social Media? Who’s Got Time To Learn This Stuff?

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Absolutely, unless we are good friends or close colleagues and I readily know who you are, unless we spoke a mere five minutes ago and you said "I'll send you an LI invitation," or similar, I expect a personalized invitation, even if it is just a brief thing. So many people use pseudonyms on the Internet and then use their real names in LI, or former colleagues get married and change their last name, or you meet a plethora of people at a conference or via social media. It is crucial to me to be able to identify who you are and how we know one another. The way my memory works, the amount I need to recall...well, it's honestly, sincerely nothing personal but I forget a lot, including people! And I might really want to connect with you. However, if I am unclear about who you are or how we know one another, I'm likely to ignore your LI invite. I've received the generic invite the majority of the time. Other times I've received nice little notes, "So good to meet you at..." or "Nice to reconnect after X years, from when we worked together at..." or similar. The worst is when the invite had lies (people said we were colleaguaes at a company I never dealt with in order to send the invite) which is a huge no no. Great article!

2 years, 6 months ago on Your Linkedin Invitations? Personalize Them. First Impressions Matter.

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So... sometimes you need a flathead and sometimes a Philips head and sometimes both might work, but use the one that works best for your screw? Radical. Logical.

2 years, 8 months ago on Shiny Object Syndrome Hurts Us All

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@Nikki Little Yes, that's it exactly! It has taken on negative connotations, and people who say the denotation is distancing have a point, too. But I don't think we need to throw out the baby with the bathwater. If we build it with substance and let it reflect who we are, it can be a valuable asset. One of them. Not THE asset. KWIM.

3 years ago on Personal Brands: You Have One, Now Deal With It

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@DenVan Dennis I am 100% okay with going back to calling it "personality" or "reputation." In fact, in my panel I kept going back to reputation (a section I cut from this post and still sort of regret, although it was a segue). As a liberal arts major working with engineers and marketing people on development teams, I was very suspicious when "marketing speak" started taking over. Why did "creative and compelling" become "out of the box?" I always suspected it was actually a vocabulary deficiency. ;) So, believe it or not, I'm with you on your key point. My objective with this post is to rabble rouse while in Rome, if you know what I mean. People are attached to the phrase and concept of personal brand (bless our hearts) and I'll work my fingers to the bones to keep it human and individual and done the so-called right way (vision-listen-share-respond-do). A HUGE THANK YOU for seeing past the abhorrent words -- personal brand -- to the heart and point of the post.

3 years ago on Personal Brands: You Have One, Now Deal With It

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I wholeheartedly agree. I believe strongly that a bad report should never be a surprise -- you should see it coming from a mile away. You should see how something is working from minute one through to conclusion. If you stay on top of it, it can simply be a setback followed by course correction versus major fail. Great points, great post!

3 years ago on No Amount of Influence or Measurement Hides Failure

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@thatdarnhelcat I hear you, sister. I think largely by "don't buy siloes" I mean that you do *have* to segment. I know you prefer to and it makes sense.

3 years ago on Personal Brands: You Have One, Now Deal With It

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@thatdarnhelcat Oh back to the siloes! I don't buy segmenting. Parenting, green issues, health, science/tech, social media and politics are my beats and I consider them all part of me and thus of my personal brand. I'm no longer even surprised how often they all mesh together on some issue. Green issues and health are frequently top of the concern list for science, parents and politicians, for example. It's me and it works.

3 years ago on Personal Brands: You Have One, Now Deal With It

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@thatdarnhelcat Hmm not sure I did (certainly did not intend to) identify siloes. That's sort of the antithesis of my point. The point of this post is to get away from the marketing headlock on this concept of personal branding and make it about individual human beings. I hope you heard that through the term that is so abhorrent to you and so many. You said, "let me just enjoy my hobbies." Yep, that is pretty much the summary of the points. Be who you are.

3 years ago on Personal Brands: You Have One, Now Deal With It

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@Howie Goldfarb It's true, not everyone is online. But let's be honest -- the majority are (68% of women in US and over 50% of men in US say they use social networking regularly) and the numbers are growing. As of Oct 9 according to Experian Simmons, "98% of online 18-to 24 year-olds already use social media each month according to Experian Simmons report. The greatest growth sector is among older Americans. Today, nearly 3-in-4 online seniors use social media in a typical month as do 82% of those ages 55 to 64." I guarantee the majority of hiring managers Google potential candidates. So my point is own your brand and build it yourself to serve the best interests, yes, of yourself, but for the greater good, too.

3 years ago on Personal Brands: You Have One, Now Deal With It

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@AnnBibby Listening is the best way to see who people think you are. I know you well enough to know I identify you with health, yoga, social good and progressive issues. I expect a lot of that is who you intend to brand yourself as because it's the content and issues you bring forward regularly. What inspires you? What do you want as your platform? Find your vision and build from there.Although...you are already doing it -- you are already building a brand (as I shared). Maybe what you might be asking is: how do I take it to the next level?

3 years ago on Personal Brands: You Have One, Now Deal With It

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@halffiction Such a good point: be yourself (or your better self). I "rebranded" (lol) KISS to "Keep it simple and straightforward." I think it applies here, too.

3 years ago on Personal Brands: You Have One, Now Deal With It

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Intriguing on many levels. I find this to be very true, "The more gated the community the more open the communications, the bigger the networks the more cautious the community. Intimate communities are characterized as open & sharing and can include anywhere from 1000 to 3000 participants." Loved your insight into this topic and the rundown. I think this post, the blog and comments are a sort of interesting case study of tribe. KWIM?

3 years ago on Don’t Create a Community – Invest in Building a Tribe

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@Danny Brown Hey maybe that's why I don't have a social media blog. ;)

3 years ago on The Wanktastic Art of Self-Proclaimed Brilliance

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@marklazen Glad to do so. I think you have a good resource -- Social Media Today frequently has been a source I've cited. I figure it's not easy to read a criticism and challenge, but I also figure it's a good opportunity to get new intel and possibly find an area to develop into something even better.

3 years ago on The Wanktastic Art of Self-Proclaimed Brilliance

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@marklazen I think you should have asked Danny: what would be an article or publishing solution that would fulfill "world's best thinkers on social media?"

I know I'd be happy if you changed the "on" to "about." I'm simple, though. :) I think you and Danny may have more complicated solutions.

3 years ago on The Wanktastic Art of Self-Proclaimed Brilliance

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Isn't declaring yourself the best sort of like giving yourself your own nickname, or like empty praise? I've never even looked at my own kids and said "you're the best ever!" I focus on the accomplishment specifically. "Wow, look how puffy and real these clouds look, just like the ones outside. I can nearly see them floating they're so cool." Let the work and accomplishment be the standard. Sure "the standard for influence" is bold and pithy. I know how valuable and necessary that is, in the market. It's worked pretty well, too, as a motto. But how about something less titular and more functional? More matter, less art. Like you said, it often seems as if the best achievements have the least horn tooting.

3 years ago on The Wanktastic Art of Self-Proclaimed Brilliance

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@tonia_ries Is it a technology block, a value block or a skill set block that usually leads to the headbanging (just out of curiosity)?Awkward segue, lol, there was a study released today about "safe headbanging best recs." LOL

3 years ago on Forget Magic Beans – What You Really Need Are Balls and a Plan!

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@danperezfilms Yes yes yes, that's it exactly -- it's a medium and a tool, and yes it does necessitate some difference but the underlying principles are much the same.

3 years ago on Forget Magic Beans – What You Really Need Are Balls and a Plan!

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@amvandenhurk I agree - you haven't go anything if you haven't given it a go.

3 years ago on Forget Magic Beans – What You Really Need Are Balls and a Plan!

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@ramartijr Being willing to fail and deal with your failures is a really major point in this. I think that so many expect 100% success all the time and really what it needs to be, as Jim says, is a series of small experiments so you can manage course correction.

3 years ago on Forget Magic Beans – What You Really Need Are Balls and a Plan!

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@AmandaQuraishi That's the real deal with social media, isn't it -- a communication connection point. I think Jim is right and you are right: NPOs are some of the most innovation and accurate (for lack of a better word) users.

3 years ago on Forget Magic Beans – What You Really Need Are Balls and a Plan!

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@tonia_ries I think you hit the nail on the head! I don't know how many times I've trained someone on social media by tapping them into using skill sets they already have. As soon as I get them to that point, it's a HUGE AH-HA. There's nothing magical about social media. It's not a wizard, it's just a short guy pulling smoke and mirrors. It's a tool any human can use.

3 years ago on Forget Magic Beans – What You Really Need Are Balls and a Plan!

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"That we will inevitably get to a point where you can question the brand without questioning the character of the person." I guess it depends upon which pond you are in. I've seen equally vociferous attacks and defense of brands, including personal ones. Again, the leaders in the different ponds of social media really vary as does the culture. Good discussion is always about the concept and both sides need to know and stick to that -- well said.

3 years ago on The Personal Branding Double Standard

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I always keep myself connected to amazing people who are doing incredible things -- social media for social good -- with this medium for *this very reason.* They are passionate about an important cause, and social media is a means, not an end. And they are so excited about how it is a means, and what it can mean. It has bolstered health messages (txt4baby, cancer, HHS accessible care), social good, fundraising, beleaguered arts organizations (which I am profiling here soon!) and more. @Tinu you are so mindful! Love it. Thanks for the message. Also? I pause to take in one beautiful thing a day. :)

3 years ago on What I’m Punking For – This Shit Works!

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Absolutely! It's an assumptive faith in numbers -- you can't argue numbers, right? Or can you? We've forgotten how to critically think through (well, anything) (but assuredly) lies, damn lies, and statistics. For every 56% of this, there is a 44% of that. And anyway, what's the 56% and how did we get it? Bob, maybe we need a guideline to critical questions to ask before drawing a conclusion from data. I think I just gave myself an assignment.

3 years ago on From Snake Oil to Selling Air

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@Kristi Hines Totally agree -- we shouldn't have to gag ourselves just to not be taken advantage of. There are reasonable boundaries and this crosses them.

3 years, 1 month ago on Is Klout Using Our Family to Violate Our Privacy?

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It caught my eyes, today, when people I know are not terribly active on social media and who I know wouldn't know Klout from a hole in the ground, were on my Klout page, with scores and links back to their private Facebook pages (my sister and father??). I've long stood for Klout as a valid system of measurement, not perfect perhaps, but relevant, and useful as a point. However, my score rapidly shifted as did my areas of influence (including to hairstyles -- which...what?), and my influencers/influencees made no sense. Initially I was confused, then concerned and worried whether I could still trust Klout as a valid point for measurement. When Tonia shared the story about her son, it sounded as if Klout very much crossed a boundary they just should not. It's a weakness in Facebook's security, sure. But weak security doesn't excuse hacking. IMHO.

3 years, 1 month ago on Is Klout Using Our Family to Violate Our Privacy?

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