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Liraz;


What did you think about this 2010 review of the Jam experiment?


http://theamericanscene.com/2010/04/28/the-non-paradox-of-choice

3 months, 2 weeks ago on Conversation @ http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/235047

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William Deresiewicz states: "Science addresses external reality, which lies outside our minds and makes itself available for objective observation. 


The arts address our experience of the world; they tell us what reality feels like."


I have read Chwe's books  and some of his other essays.


It is one thing to criticize even the attempt to read literature through a game theoretic lens, and another to complain that a particular author does it poorly.


One important value of modelling is to show that two things which look different can be seen as the same strategic situation.  


Thomas Schelling, for example, has consistently re-told the Xenophon story:

'A Greek general and student of Socrates, he would not shy from putting his men in a situation in which retreat was both hard & a visible input to his enemy's reasoning -Xenophon's  Gully."


He has re-told it and found a number of variations.  Schelling does this well.


Steven Brams is more explicit in his review of the strategic literature found in the Hebrew Bible, http://mitpress.mit.edu/books/biblical-games.


I find it harder to evaluate Brams' work because of his reliance on his own, very interesting, version of game theory.


But certainly when we re-tell the story of Abraham it is hard for us not to raise the strategic questions Brams forces upon us.


Neither Schelling, Chwe  or Brams state or defend: "Consilience,” the idea that we can overcome the split between “the two cultures” by bringing art and science into conceptual unity."  And so the reviewer takes us off an jihad against a ghost army.  Amusing, entertaining, yet largely beside the point.


The difficulty I have with Chwe's work is this.  For game theory to produce useful insights, we have to start with identifying a strategic situation that we understand - no theory need apply.  We understand Xenophon's Gully.  And so, we can model it as simple game - simple to state & hard to play.  


I didn't find in Chwe's book on Jane Austen anything as  clear or crystalline such as Xenophon's Gully or Brams' comparable re-telling of Abraham.   It could be me & I missed something.


But, my sympathies are with the reviewer who asks: "why Elizabeth Bennet, to take the most obvious example, rejects Mr. Darcy the first time he proposes but accepts him on the next go-round."


I would love to hear or read Chwe's analysis of this strategic problem!





7 months, 3 weeks ago on Conversation @ http://www.newrepublic.com/article/116170/jane-austen-game-theorist-michael-suk-young-chwe-joke

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This is can be very simple, if you focus on the information that is made available to the public, often at no charge.

1.  When you buy a franchise, you aren't investing in something like a franchise index.  So, you don't care about anything other than the chances your investment works out.

2.  The place to start your investigation is with the Item 20 of the FDD of your franchise.  This lists the various turnovers.  To be very conservative, which is a good thing in this context, treat any and all transfers as failures.  Calculate the failure rate for your system.   Act accordingly.

1 year, 1 month ago on Conversation @ http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/227394

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 @WardWilson  @IndependentIan  Points for getting the quote right!  Big difference between "history" and "past".  

 

And Santayana was the philosopher who would have attended to this difference.

1 year, 4 months ago on Access denied | Foreign Policy

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 @WardWilson  @ProductoEndorsair No, the 2 H-Bombs might not have been the equivalent of Sherman's march on Atlanta.  At least, not in the Japanese minds.  

 

Ward has done a great job of articulating this thesis.  I think his focus on what the Japanesse commanders were seeing after the H-Bombs is super.

 

But, once Russia wasn't neutral, the Japanese faced a Buridan Ass choice. Who to surrender to?

 

Which story -amazing & unpredictable science- or -we made a mistake with our allies- was going to be chosen as the cover story for surrender?

 

Again, Ward explains why the amazing & unpredictable science story was going to be chosen by the Japanese.

 

Has there been any harm in two sides believing different things about the role of the H-Bombs?  

 

Or did both sides come to believe after the fact that there was a common interest in preserving this myth?

 

1 year, 4 months ago on Access denied | Foreign Policy

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I am a huge supporter of the franchise model, but this graphic is terribly misleading.  The worst offence is to suggest franchising is less riskier than starting your own business.  Even if it was true, and it isn't, the personal guarantees you sign as a franchisee make the loss loom much larger.   You are signing up for a 10 - 20 year term.  I would suggest that anyone who wants to learn the real nuts and bolts about franchising read the IAFD's experts at: www.franchise-info.us

2 years, 2 months ago on Weighing the Options: To Franchise or Self-Start [INFOGRAPHIC]

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 @nbarnard No.  The use of a telephone is irrelevant.

2 years, 6 months ago on In the Trenches: Our Money Back Guarantee

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 @nbarnard Yes, and this training exercise was designed for a two person interaction.  Could it be changed to telephone exercise?  Sure, I don't see any problem.  Could it be reduced to a decision tree and an exercise in optimization?  Very much doubt it.

2 years, 6 months ago on In the Trenches: Our Money Back Guarantee

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 @nbarnard There is no suggestion that it can be done by a "purely online interaction". I am not sure how you got that idea.  Perhaps you could point to something I wrote? 

 

The idea is that there is an exercise which will train staff to spot or identify bad customers.  The training exercise was based upon facts from an aftermarket automotive franchise system.  (And the training exercise is free to anyone who asks for it - as soon as I can that plugin to work. ) 

2 years, 6 months ago on In the Trenches: Our Money Back Guarantee

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 @nbarnard Thanks, but I was already aware of the MT Notifier plugin. 

 

But, what if you had actually diagnosed and solved the plugin problem?  Would you have intended it as a gift, or would you have wanted money?  

 

Most  people would have shared the information, but they don't expect to run a business that way.  However, there is a group of people who prey on the natural reaction to share.  Do you think it is a good idea to identify these people?

2 years, 6 months ago on In the Trenches: Our Money Back Guarantee

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 @nbarnard Thanks for the observation about MT notifier, some MT plugins are just annoying.  

2 years, 6 months ago on In the Trenches: Our Money Back Guarantee

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 @nbarnard Sorry you feel that way.  Pretty sure you missed the point of the training exercise, however.

 

But you demonstrate exactly the type of person who I would never give any more information to: you will never be committed as a negotiation training customer.  The exercise would be wasted on you, at this time.

2 years, 6 months ago on In the Trenches: Our Money Back Guarantee

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Nick, have you read my article?  I am in the business of designing business models that don't give away confidential information to customers who cannot demonstrate commitment.

 

Aren't you asking me to give away confidential information to Cranky before he is committed as customer of mine?

 

Why would I do that?  (On the other hand, I can send you the training exercise for free and you can try your hand at designing your own changes, test, and revise.  My compliments.)

2 years, 6 months ago on In the Trenches: Our Money Back Guarantee

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Brett writes: "After all, we had worked hard to find him an itinerary that most people would have been very happy to take. He used us. But I was also angry at myself. Could we have made our money back guarantee clearer to avoid this? Could we have structured it differently?"

 

Uh, you gave all your confidential information away before getting a commitment.  This why you have bad customers, http://www.franchise-info.ca/supply_chain/2012/03/why-you-have-bad-customers-what-do-to-about-it.html

2 years, 6 months ago on In the Trenches: Our Money Back Guarantee

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@rsomers I agree with your observation, and would take it back to bulletin boards. I don't know what the term UGC got dropped.

3 years ago on Why-Fi? Destroy Real-Time Social Media Obstacles

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In Alberta, you are paying about$19.95 a month for the lowest level of bandwith. Routers are comparable in price to the US.

But you are making the good point - these are no longer options, it should be part of everyone's marketing expenses.

3 years ago on Why-Fi? Destroy Real-Time Social Media Obstacles

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I think that you want to measure how a particular piece of content was seen by your audience. You measures seem to me too general.

Here are the (3) things I look at for my clients, was it interesting, authoritative and did it work as a marketing piece?

1. Interesting – look at page views, then average times, then and then source. Use a backlinks strategy to increase variation after publication.

2. Authority – use Google’s top ten authorities to try to engage those people.

3. Marketing – measure some call to action, something you want people to do after reading the article, if they want more.

Here is a detailed example of how these measures work:

http://www.franchise-info.ca/monetizing/2011/10/measure-content-marketing.html

3 years ago on The 4 Types of Content Metrics That Matter

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