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We’re emotional creatures. Taking the high road and saying “I’m sorry” can diffuse a situation and lay the foundation for a fruitful relationship. Doing nothing pisses off and alienates potential allies, customers and employees.

Your account reminds me of why I “flushed” a company that was recruiting me… Strike One was when the VP of HR stood me up for a scheduled call (reason: he was having dinner with the CEO). Strike Two was when he was 30-minutes late for the rescheduled call (reason: none given). Strike Three was another call with the CEO that didn’t happen (reason: a week later she responded to my calls/emails with “Oh, something came up”).

No apologies.

And to think that they were recruiting me! Imagine if, as a job candidate, I didn’t show up for a call or was late to a meeting? Sheesh!

3 years, 7 months ago on The Art of the Apology

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@ginidietrich @KEXINO I'm curious to hear thoughts on "disconnecting" from those who do not share their connections or later change their settings to not share them. Hello, that's the value of LI! Has anyone flushed a connection for this reason? Thanks.

3 years, 8 months ago on Accepting Standard LinkedIn Invites

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@KEXINO I agree on the sharing of contacts... My contact settings reads: "

I believe in keeping an open contact list and am therefore only interested in connecting with those who will reciprocate. If you are uncomfortable with your contact list being open to me, then I'll pass. Thanks." But that often doesn't register.

Good point!

3 years, 8 months ago on Accepting Standard LinkedIn Invites

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Great post, Gini, as I have a bunch of these "invitations" staring at me. I Agree on both counts... If it is important to connect, then at least take a few seconds to personalize the invitation (pet peeve). I am protective of my LI professional contacts, so I don't generally accept invitations from unknown contacts - especially ones that claim we've done business together when we haven't. The way I see it, the professionals I am connected to have trusted me with their contacts; I want to be a good steward. I'm more open to using other platforms and some of those relationships springboard into a connection on LI. Thanks!

3 years, 8 months ago on Accepting Standard LinkedIn Invites

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When I first started working, I was shocked to read memos and emails from the CEO and other executives that were filled with grammatical errors and other misused words. I thought, “How in the world did these people get these jobs when they butcher the English language?” (Spoken like an English major!) For context, most were technologists. I’m more numb to it but I still zero-in on these things...

Misused words pet peeve: “there” vs. “their” vs. “they’re.” Didn’t we get taught that in, say, fourth grade? Ugh!

Corporate BS jargon pet peeve: “a leading provider of…” Seems like EVERY technology company claims this in their press releases. Yawn! I’ve always wanted to do a satirical press release that describes the entity as mediocre or fair-to-middling. I recently wrote about this and other marketing peeves on my blog.

Frightening misused words trend: a high school senior I know from my local cycling club routinely uses “an” instead of “and” in his Facebook posts. For instance, “I ate a burger an fries.” I assume he’s a product of Hooked on Phonics. Makes you wonder what there – er, they’re (sorry, couldn’t resist!) – teaching these kids in school!

I suspect SMS and FB will exacerbate this trend. Very scary.

Sending you a virtual generator and snowplow...

3 years, 10 months ago on Grammar Pet Peeves

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Love Statler & Waldorf (the old men) from the Muppets! Next week, Gonzo or Beaker, please...

Your statement that "many business leaders are afraid to participate online for fear of what people will say about them or their companies" sounds like many of the discussions I have with executives. When pressed, most say they are afraid of giving up control. Of course, there is no such thing as control. Never was.

It’s interesting that these business leaders will gladly hire a pro to critique and fix their golf swing but are reluctant to solicit potentially unflattering feedback about their company or product even though that’s how they earn their living.

Thanks for the reminder!

3 years, 10 months ago on Your Mom Tells You What You Want to Hear

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@wabbitoid @ginidietrich Correct. But I now include "listening" as one of the basics. Why? Because fundamentals like news placements are online and include comments - it's social. I met with a CEO of a technology business last week whose company has been included in an industry buyers guide published online. He was unaware, however, that several comments had been posted that inaccurately portrayed his product. Had someone been listening, those concerns could have been addressed. That's not new, neato-beano marketing, it's smart marketing.

3 years, 10 months ago on Marketing Has a Long Way to Go

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Actually, the statistic that floors me is that 70% have little understanding of social media conversations surrounding their brand. I interpret this to mean that companies are not monitoring or listening, much less participating in the conversation.

Given recent discussions I've had with startups and small tech businesses, I'd peg that number to be higher: they're doing nothing. Which is stunning, since some of them are very cutting edge w/r/t their market space.

Then again, I've found that most of these companies are run by technologists with little marketing experience.

3 years, 10 months ago on Marketing Has a Long Way to Go

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@ginidietrich Yup - the counsel was don't return the call and the journalist would go away. And, no, the agency didn't want to touch the journalist either. Interesting, huh?

My take was that silence = no comment and that would be a very bad idea. Turns out I was right.

You can't only weigh in on good news. In fact, I'd submit that it's more important to comment on the not-so-rosy news. Which Ryan Richert above wisely did.

3 years, 10 months ago on How “No Comment” Has Edelman In Trouble

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For such an important (and budget-consuming) marketing strategy, it's interesting that companies and their agencies tend to fail on the basic blocking and tackling. Who knows how many chances to influence a discussion or do damage control have been lost because those opportunites fell into a balck hole or were bungled at the point of contact...

Oh, and I can top "no comment" - as a tactic to dodge a journalist who was pursuing an unflattering story, our team was counseled by a junior-level PR account manager to not say "no comment" but rather to promise but never deliver a return call from one of our executives . Needless to say, it didn't turn out very well!

In PR, you need to be available for the good and even more so for the bad.

3 years, 10 months ago on How “No Comment” Has Edelman In Trouble

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