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Thank you for this. 

When I first met my husband he wasn't a wine drinker. In his eyes, Sutter Home White Zinfandel and Yellow Tail were the best wines ever. Which is weird because he also subscribed to highly rated and expensive wine is always delicious to everyone. He's a conundrum like that. 

And there I was ... with my wine magazines and Malbec and spicy Carmenere. It took months before he'd even try a sip. We watched Bottle Shock one night and he confessed that reason he didn't like wine is because he didn't feel smart enough to know what he liked. The tasting notes completely threw him. "Why would I want to drink something that tastes like saddle leather?"

He knew how much I loved different wines and how excited I was when I found something new and lovely, so he asked me to help him learn. Which is hilarious because I know a lot of people who are really smart about wine but I'm not one of them. I do, however, know what I like.

We started at local wineries and then we moved to wine tastings. Bite of Oregon was a huge eye opener for him. I was careful to never let him see labels (because he's a marketer's dream and loves the shiny) and pretty soon he could tell me what he liked and what he didn't. Now he judges wine by taste, not solely by rating or price. And he's found some great surprises on his own. Pretty awesome ... and sans saddle leather, too.

8 months, 2 weeks ago on To Be or Not To Be Influenced By Ratings

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Wow. I read things like this - sadly, I've read too many - and I'm reminded of Men In Black when Kay says, "A person is smartPeople are dumb, panicky dangerous animals and you know it." I've no time for willful ignorance or the dark hatred it breeds and those who practice it are removed from my life. Sometimes that means relatives but the line has to be drawn by someone and if not with me, then with whom?


1 year, 2 months ago on No More Apologies

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@yvettepistorio @LisaDJenkins I swear, for years I though there was something really wrong with me. When online communications started I had a hard time reconciling my ability to function well there with my inability to come out of the corner in real world situations. Then I found Lisa Petrilli and everything began to make sense. Since then I've found that what I used to view as limitations are actually the assets (that you touched on) that make me great at my job. I think the value in posts like this is that they help brands to understand that while they are attracted the idea of a dynamic, look at me, full of hype personality crafting their voice, people like us bring much needed stability to a fast paced, fluid environment.

1 year, 2 months ago on Five Ways Introverts Make Great Community Managers

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Like reading myself in a mirror. 

1 year, 2 months ago on Five Ways Introverts Make Great Community Managers

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I used to think my inability to do for myself everything I could do for others somehow called my professional worth into question. The day I realized the value (and freedom) of reaching beyond my own perspective to invite the perpectives of trusted peers and colleagues changed the way I made every business decision. My favorite perspectives were those that ran counter to my initial thoughts. Those that said I just might be wrong or those that said I might not be thinking big enough and was shrinking from a challenge out of fear. I'm in a dead space right now and you've reminded me why. Time to start putting some questions out there and begin listening. Thank you :)  

1 year, 7 months ago on Taking a Look at Your Business From the Outside In

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 @Lisa Gerber I read that and thought, "Well, here's a man I could be best friends with!" 

1 year, 8 months ago on The Perfect Thanksgiving Wine Pairing Guide

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Thank you. For the smirking Don Draper and for articulating something that weighs heavily on me. I am empathetic by nature which means that when I see suffering, my immediate response is to try and reduce or relieve that suffering. I understand that Need must be communicated but when I am faced with a barrage of tragic images that show suffering, I am overwhelmed. So much so that I have begun to block the channels these images come from - not because I don't want to acknowledge the need but because it's the only way I can preserve my own mental wellness. My emotional makeup doesn't allow me to see those images and carry on with my day.

 

Things like Movember and the approach of Global Hope Network are easier on my soul. Global Hope Network works to transform the poorest villages in the world by providing them with sustainable access to water, food, wellness, income and educaton. Their website could be stuffed with BEFORE images of emaciated, weather-torn people but it's not. It showcases images of the AFTER - of smiling, healthy, vibrant people. Same goes for their Facebook Wall. The pay-off is that I've not once hidden their Facebook feed and when I see their images on Facebook, I almost always click to their website to see the progress of villages I've helped and find out where I can help next. If that's not a winning strategy, I don't know what is.

1 year, 8 months ago on How to Motivate Behavior With The Right Emotions

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This year, there will be Champagne and although we haven't decided upon which, yet, we will be drinking it all day long; possibly a Bollinger because I've never tasted it. For pouring at dinner, I'm taking the suggestion from a few posts back and giving Rosé a place at the table. It's not a wine I'm familiar with so the Tranche looks like the front runner. 

1 year, 8 months ago on The Perfect Thanksgiving Wine Pairing Guide

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It's good to see my job through someone else's eyes. "Oh, it takes time?" Thanks for the outright giggle, Ken!

1 year, 8 months ago on There is No Social Media Utopia

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That pitch is key: what do you offer to who and what do you want from them in return. I learned a lot about the elevator pitch from Melissa Pierce last month - she had some instructive object lessons that drove the importance of a well crafted pitch straight home.

1 year, 8 months ago on Eight Ways to Jump Start Your Business

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 @Patrick Werry  @LisaDJenkins Oh for the love of MIKE! You, too, Patrick? I'll have to make this Rose tasting a priority. Excellent field research opportunities!

 

1 year, 9 months ago on Northwest Rosé: Embrace the Pink

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Fine. I've run from Rose for years but my admiration for Small House Winery will nudge me into pink wine territory. From the taste descriptions, I think I'll most enjoy the Cinder Dry Rose so I'll start there and report back. 

1 year, 9 months ago on Northwest Rosé: Embrace the Pink

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What happens to a Page if they're caught by Facebook doing a contest outside the Guidelines?  I've yet to find anyone who's seen it go down and can tell me about the process.  

 

Does Facebook take the Page down? Do they ban the Administrator of the Page from Facebook? Does Facebook actively police for Guidelines infractions or do they wait for someone to turn the Page/Contest in?

 

These are my questions ... who has some answers?

 

 

2 years ago on Do As I Say, Not As I Do: Confessions of a Social Media Hypocrite

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"It is impossible to execute marketing campaigns today without a basic understanding of the capabilities of technology."  Thank you.  Half of the value I bring is understanding the back-end of all the platforms involved in a comprehensive campaign and it's what differentiates me from the "gal who will put you on Facebook for $100 a month".

2 years ago on Five Ways to Become a PR Technologist

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Let's be serious. I own a library, with well over 3000 books and the list grows each month. I adore all things paper, ink and written word; to pick 10 favorites might be possible if I could have a list for each genre. To pick 10 of the most memorable ... I'll stick with fiction for this list. 

 

1. A Wrinkle in Time/Madeleine L'Engle

2. The Alchemist/Paulo Coelho

3. Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch/Terry Pratchett & Neil Gaiman

4. The Pillars of the Earth/Ken Follett

5. The Portable Dorothy Parker

6. Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norell/Susanna Clarke

7. The Mists of Avalon/Marion Zimmer Bradley

8. An Instance of the Finger post/ Ian Pears

9. Confessions of an Ugly Stepsister/Gregory Maguire

10. The Wheel of Time/Robert Jordan

 

I also adore Lewis Carroll, Jane Austen, Shakespeare, Agatha Christie, Patrick McManus, L.E, Modesitt, George R.R. Martin .... I should just stop.  I have to work at some point today.

 

2 years ago on Top 10 Favorite Books of All-Time

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 @TheJackB I agree, Jack.  The change in voice due to turnover is a valid concern, as is the establishment of who owns the profile at the outset of its creation.  The NoahKravitz/PhoneDog lawsuit brought this point home in December.  People in charge of placing online content managers have to be crystal clear about roles and responsibilities -  online marketing policies and guidelines go a long way toward establishing that clarity.  I think, too, that there is still a tendency to silo online marketing off from the other departments within a corporate structure - and that often encourages rogue behavior.

2 years, 4 months ago on Three Ways to Avoid Rogue Behaviors

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 @Lisa Gerber You're awesome - I can't believe I submitted that.  Yikes!

2 years, 4 months ago on Three Ways to Avoid Rogue Behaviors

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 @KenMueller I haven't seen too much of this scenario either, but when I do see it, it is destructive.  No one wants to believe the worst may surface in the people they work with, but an ounce of prevention can go a long way toward heading it off.

 

We DO need to chat!  I've been fairly quiet on Twitter and Facebook for a while - refocusing and whatnot.  I'll drop you a line :)  

2 years, 4 months ago on Three Ways to Avoid Rogue Behaviors

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Oh wow - that's a really bad sentence.  Should have been:  "I spent weeks searching out profiles across the Internet and trying to establish ownership and control so that correct and accurate information could be repopulated."  Whew!

2 years, 4 months ago on Three Ways to Avoid Rogue Behaviors

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Creating good, original content IS hard and delivering it with consistency is harder still. Early on I decided that, unless I had something of value to put out into the ether, I wouldn't publish. There's only so many ways to say "Facebook is RAD" and the blogosphere doesn't need my echo added to everyone else's. I don't blog often. I stand before you a self-proclaimed "Occasional, Erratic Blogger". When I hit that send button, it's because I've reached a point where I can no longer ignore the topic at hand and have to put my two cents worth in writing - humble as that two cents may be, it's mine.

And paper.li? Oy. More and more I get the impression that people use it as a way to include their name with those of big(ger) players in the hopes that some type of perceived value of association is realized. Cynical? Maybe, but there it is. Myself? I'm a lover of the RT and that's how I'll continue to pass on other people's great stuff.

3 years, 2 months ago on Take the Easy Route. Everyone Is Doing It.

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Regardless of whether or not the content is helpful – you have to be honest about the fact that you are using someone else’s space to promote your own agenda/client/business.

Posting to another's Page is just like hanging a poster in their brick and mortar business. Storefront or Page, I believe the same rules apply. It's not about whether or not the content is helpful – it’s about being polite. Introduce yourself to the Page’s owner - offline if at all possible or by email, form a relationship . . . . then ASK if you can share your information, you never know, they may just offer to share it for you!

3 years, 3 months ago on Social Media Permission Marketing

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@Martyn Chamberlin I KNEW it sounded familiar! I haven't read those stories for ages - thanks for the memory jog :)

3 years, 5 months ago on Why We Say No

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@Rileyhar I agree, Riley. Saying no takes a lot of courage when you're weighing instant revenue against, say, not buying milk for a week.

3 years, 5 months ago on Why We Say No

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@PRville It is a little scary! But worth it. One of the perks of saying no and passing opportunities to more appropriately qualified peers and colleagues is the forming of relationships with them. The first time I said no, I was approached by a health care facility and I knew immediately that I wasn't the right fit. I contacted someone I knew of but didn't "know" and asked if I could pass them on as a recommended referral. The result was that I now have a budding relationship with an A-List blogger who works with C Level clients - and she has gone far out of her way to extend help and encouragement to me time and again. I wouldn't trade that relationship for any amount of revenue.

3 years, 5 months ago on Why We Say No

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@hackmanj Thank you! I think it's important to note that my self-employed career is very young and that saying no is wisdom I learned from more experienced, seasoned colleauges who wanted to ease my way. Had they not shared their view with me, I might have beat my head against the revenue for revenue's sake wall for years. None of us get where we are alone and I am indebted to each of them.

3 years, 5 months ago on Why We Say No

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@Martyn Chamberlin That's a perfect illustration - I dont' suppose it's based in verifiable fact, is it?

3 years, 5 months ago on Why We Say No

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@MikeHale I really can't stress the impact that providing alternative resources to someone you can't say yes to has on future relationships, Mike. It softens the blow and also allows us to give something back to the people in our network. Although, I also have a policy of only passing along opportunities I wish I could say yes to - that protects my peer/colleague relationships which are just as important as my client relationships.

3 years, 5 months ago on Why We Say No

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@HowieG Ethics is what it comes down to.

A-List actors woking B-Flicks (usually) have a far more finely tuned skills set than their B-List counterparts and those skills bring benfit rather than harm to the overall production. Conversely, a B-List actor may not have honed their skills to a level where their presence in an A-Flick isn't a jarring inconsistency.

If you believe that you have both the A-List knowledge and expertise to deliver your B-FLick client a superb return on their investment in you, and that your excitement (or lack thereof) won't impact your performance negatively, then you may be a good fit. Tthat's what being a professional is all about. It's easy to rep the things we have an inate love of, it's far more difficult to bring our A-game to the others.

3 years, 5 months ago on Why We Say No

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@angelabarsotti Stand your ground, Angela. If we as business owners don't have the best interests of our customer at heart, our reputations will show it in no time. And you're right, it's not industry specific - any business will show the cracks. The people I've said no to appreciated by honesty and continue to recommend me to others. I've yet to rethink my Just Say No philosophy.

3 years, 5 months ago on Why We Say No

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@deleted_6629_lisagerber Saying no in the context of an established client relationship is, admittedly, more difficult than saying No up front. When I've faced that decision, I've had to remind myself that I"m not saying no becasue I can't do the job but because an argument for the income has become untenable when compared to the time I invest. When I divide my fee by the number of hours I work on a project and come up with $8 an hour, there's a problem I can't afford to ignore. That's time I'm not able to devote to other clients and I end up working 20 hour days routinely. It's no good for anyone involved.

3 years, 5 months ago on Why We Say No

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@ginidietrich One of the most valuable pieces of information that was shared with me when I first started out on my own was, "Remember you have the power to fire a client". It's never fun, but it does happen. Taking a fee for services rendered does not sign us up to be a personal doormat for a client's bad days.

3 years, 5 months ago on Why We Say No

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@sydcon_mktg It is a necessary growing pain, and I think embracing the need for it early on helped me to grow a lean but healthy business. Saying no seems scary because it's the opposite of what most people think of as business, but I practice saying no to the right clients and my revenue is stable which allows me to grow carefully. I'll take that over a sporadic influx of non-invested clients any day!

3 years, 5 months ago on Why We Say No

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@John Falchetto That's a great triangle model, John. Understanding that saying No also protects the limited resource of time we have at our disposal is an important piece of the decision making process. A bird in the hand is not necessarily worth two in the bush . . .

3 years, 5 months ago on Why We Say No

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@bdorman264 First, I think you get a gold star for not writing "irregardless". Nicely done.

You're right. Making sure a relationship works for both parties is necessary or the risk to reputation is very real. Just because I can doesn't mean I should is at the forefront of my thoughts when considering a business relationship. Making sale does my no good unless the end result is an ecstatically happy client I can use as a reference.

3 years, 5 months ago on Why We Say No

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I'm so excited for you, Lisa - way to grab to brass ring!

3 years, 6 months ago on Introducing Lisa Gerber!

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I'm so excited for you, Lisa - way to grab to brass ring! Please eat something delicious for me every day.

3 years, 6 months ago on Introducing Lisa Gerber!

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