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Congrats Doug. Big news indeed. I look forward to reading The Curiosity Manifesto and twilting with you.

Best,

Stan

6 months ago on [Huge Announcement] Are You Living the Curious Life?

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Great thorough article Dan.

Whether we like it or not, people will always try to game the system of influence. These are the people that seek the shortcut instead of putting in the work. It's akin to liposuction vs. going to the gym. The former can get you quick results, but they aren't lasting. I agree with Jessica, people will eventually see through it.

Jackie Huba distills this lesson from one of the most influential people today. In her latest book about Lady Gaga entitled Monster Loyalty, she talks about how Gaga would rather have engaged fans as opposed to passive followers. She'd trade 50 million likes for a small fraction of her "little monsters". She gets it.

You utilize TV ads as a reference point in the beginning of the post. I think you can draw a similar comparison between the introduction of television advertising and social media. In the early days of TV, people actually watched ads. Doctors for God's sake shilled cigarettes and praised the benefits of smoking. And we bought it, lock stock and barrel. Decades passed and our experience first taught us to distrust ads and then flat out ignore them. We're in the adolescence of social media. People will soon also see through the facade of online influence and then disregard things like Klout scores or Top X lists. 

I recently was listed in a Top 60 influencer list for CX. It wasn't by a publication, but by a prominent technology firm. I was excited to see my name listed until I realized that I was listed twice. That told me all I needed to know about the credibility of this list. 

True influence needs to be earned. It can only be earned through warmth, competence and through the art of giving.

Best,

Stan


6 months, 3 weeks ago on Gaming Influence: Walking The Fine Line

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Doug - you are an inspiration. Thanks for being a constant reminder about the importance of reading. Keep being relentless.

1 year ago on My Vision for the #1000Books Community: Read, Discuss, Understand

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Jeannie - you make some salient points, but I think you are taking a narrow view of what marketing is. It is no longer just about the prospect. The customer experience is definitely part of marketing. 

Regis McKenna made the famous quote in the Harvard Business Review back in 1991, "Marketing is everything and everything is marketing." He asserted there's a new paradigm for marketing, a model that depends on the marketer's knowledge, experience, and ability to integrate the customer and the company. He suggested that marketing is like quality. It is not a function but an all-pervasive way of doing business.

Even the AMA takes a broader view. According to their site, "Marketing is the activity, set of institutions, and processes for creating, communicating, delivering, and exchanging offerings that have value for customers, clients, partners, and society at large."

I believe the CMO of the future needs to more concerned about the customer than the prospect. They should focus less on the communicating and concentrate on the delivery. Too many view the experience as an expense, rather than an investment in their brand. 

My goal is to shift focus and dollars in marketing from the prospect to the customer. A brand is merely a promise. The old school view of marketing were the words and images that conveyed that promise to prospects. The experience was the delivery on that promise to customers.  

The experience doesn't replace traditional marketing, but it is definitely part of marketing. And I believe its a much bigger part of marketing today.








1 year, 2 months ago on Customer Experience Is NOT Marketing

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@samfiorella @9INCHmarketing

Sam, even though you are vertically challenged . . . I'll always have to look up to you Sensei.

You're dead on regarding leadership and conviction. This requires a total paradigm shift for management. You can sum it up in one sentence, "It's a commitment, not a campaign." There are no shortcuts on the extra mile.

My goal is to inspire leaders to make that shift. Invest in employees and customers before bowing to shareholders or chasing the prospects. 

Thanks for the plug on the books. I've amassed over 2,000 examples of companies who practice marketing g.l.u.e. (marketing by giving little unexpected extras). Here are slideshares previewing both books:

What's Your Purple Goldfish -12 Ways to Win Customers and Influence Word of Mouth

http://www.slideshare.net/9INCHMARKETING/in-search-of-your-purple-goldfish

What's Your Green Goldfish - Beyond Dollars: 15 Ways to Drive Employee Engagement and Reinforce Culture

http://www.slideshare.net/9INCHMARKETING/whats-your-green-goldfish-beyond-dollars-15-ways-to-drive-employee-engagement-and-reinforce-culture

1 year, 3 months ago on Customer Experience is the Only Competitive Advantage Left

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Great post Sam. We rarely see eye to eye, but I couldn't agree more. To tweak a famous line by William Jefferson Clinton, "It's about the experience stupid."

Marketing at its essence is the quest for differentiation. You need to find ways to stand out from your competition. How can you add value and become a talk-able by design?

Social media is not the answer. It's only part of the answer. You need to get the experience right first. @PeterShankman nailed it this week, "Take care of the customers you have . . . and they'll bring you the customers you want." You need to give your customers something to talk, tweet, blog and post to Facebook about.

Best,

Stan

"The longest and hardest nine inches in marketing is the distance between the brain and the heart of your customer"


1 year, 3 months ago on Customer Experience is the Only Competitive Advantage Left

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Thanks Jeannie. I'm so glad you enjoyed the book. My goal is for it to inspire action. I'm giving away the eBook today (April 5th) through midnight. Here is link for your readers: 

http://www.amazon.com/Whats-Goldfish-Beyond-Dollars-ebook/dp/B00C11XJ7W/

Warmest regards,

Stan

1 year, 4 months ago on Money As a Motivator: Not What You Think

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 @shawmu  @tedcoine  Thanks Shawn. My mission is to help shift focus towards employees and the importance of culture. I'm making the eBook free on Amazon between April 1st and April 5th http://www.amazon.com/Whats-Goldfish-Beyond-Dollars-ebook/dp/B00C11XJ7W/

1 year, 4 months ago on Foreword for What's Your Green Goldfish by @TedCoine

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 @Al Smith Thanks Al for your support. 

1 year, 4 months ago on Foreword for What's Your Green Goldfish by @TedCoine

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 @Curtman40 Vital investment. I totally agree.

1 year, 5 months ago on Building Minds at Hoar Construction

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Great points Jeannie. It needs to be relevant to the brand and add value to the experience. If it doesn't meet those two criteria, then I shall steal a line from Mel Brooks' Blazing Saddles, "Badges, we don't need no stinkin' badges. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TFwprS_L6tg

PS - Mel stole the line from the 1927 novel The Treasure of Sierra Madre. 

1 year, 5 months ago on The Gamification of Experience

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Great post Daniel. There is no such thing as meeting expectations. You either exceed them or you fall short. If you aren't practicing marketing g.l.u.e (giving little unexpected extras), you are destined to wallow in the sea of sameness.

Best,

Stan

 @9INCHmarketing 

"The longest and hardest nine inches in marketing is the distance between the brain and the heart of your customer"

1 year, 5 months ago on Customer Experience: Why Mediocre is the New Bad (Video)

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Great post Margie. Focus on the one in your hand, rather than the two in the bush. Retention is the new acquisition.

Best,

Stan

1 year, 6 months ago on Customer Acquisition is Just The First Step

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Sam - let's hope this is not just lipstick on a pig. Because we all know its impossible to make chicken salad from chicken sh*t. 

Let's hope they have listened to the voice of the customer and figured out ways to make meaningful changes to the customer experience. 

Let's hope this is a beacon . . . a small signpost on the journey back to winning the trust. 

Let's hope there is something behind the branding. More stars and less strifes.

Best,

Stan

1 year, 6 months ago on American Airlines Rebrand – Lipstick on a Pig

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 @MaureenMonarch Thanks Maureen. Seth Godin was a big inspiration, but the reasoning for purple is that it is one of the three colors of Mardi Gras. I wanted a direct correlation to New Orleans as it was the birthplace of lagniappe. What's Your Purple Goldfish is the first book in a trilogy. I'm currently about halfway through the Project for the second book which is the green goldfish. http://list.ly/list/1OE-green-goldfish-project Green represents the little things you do for employees. It works on the premise that happy employees create happy customers. The last will be the Golden Goldfish. Gold will explore how you reward the top 20% of customers and employees.

The goldfish relates to size and growth. I wanted something small and I was fascinated by the factors that influence the size of a goldfish. Unfortunately no direct relation to Pike Place Market and the FiSH philosophy.

I'll be interested to hear your thoughts as you delve further.

Best,

Stan

 @9INCHmarketing 

1 year, 9 months ago on Being Better, Being Different, and Your Purple Goldfish

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Doug,

Glad to hear you've enjoyed the book. More importantly I'm thrilled that it has inspired you towards action. 

Lots of strong insights on your review. You are absolutely spot on. Just saying you are "better" isn't enough. Actions speaks louder than words. Everyone says they want to go to heaven, but few are actually willing to pay the price. One of my favorite quotes in the book is from Roger Staubach who eloquently stated, "There are no traffic jams on the extra mile."

To set the record straight, your KIVA purple goldfish does qualify. One of the 12 types are those little extras that 'Pay It Forward'.

Thanks for taking the time to share your thoughts. I hope other readers in the community are motivated towards action. To that extent, here is a little extra for your readers. A link to an executive summary of the book on Scribd: http://www.scribd.com/doc/77302823/What-s-Your-Purple-Goldfish-Executive-Summary

Furthermore - I'd love to give a copy of the book to one of your readers. Best comment . . . best example . . . best critique . . . you decide.

Warmest regards,

Stan

 @9inchmarketing 

"The longest and hardest nine inches in marketing is the distance between the brain and the heart of your customers and employees"

 

 

1 year, 9 months ago on Being Better, Being Different, and Your Purple Goldfish

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Sam - let's not throw the baby out with the bathwater. While I agree that some posts can border on the ridiculous, the use of analogy can be a powerful tool.

 

According to Wikipedia, "Analogy is a cognitive process of transferring information or meaning from a particular subject (the analogue or source) to another particular subject (the target). Analogy plays a significant role in problem solving, decision making, perception, memory, creativity, emotion, explanation and communication. It has been argued that analogy is "the core of cognition."

 

One of the posts in your 'signs of the Apocalypse' section is the subject of an upcoming book by Jackie Huba @jackiehuba called, Monster Business: Loyalty Lessons from Lady Gaga. I've heard Jackie speak about Lady Gaga and I look forward to learning more about her six lessons in 2013.

 

Let's let the reader separate the wheat from the chaff.

 

Best,

Stan

 

PS - As far sending me the additional posts for commenting . . . don't bother as I already have the book 'Marketing Lessons from the Grateful Dead: What Every Business Can Learn from the Most Iconic Band in History' by David Meerman Scott @dmscott and Brian Halligan @bhalligan 

1 year, 9 months ago on Breaking News: The Blogosphere Will Self-Destruct In The Year 2013!

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A classic tale Sam with a twist. Thanks for sharing. 

I'm heading to Toronto as we speak (courtesy of VIA rail). Look forward to seeing you at IMPACT99 and sharing a beer or three.

Best,

Stan

1 year, 10 months ago on Adopting a New Perspective on Success

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Love #20 Margie. Love, love, love.... love is all you need. You have it in abundance.

Great post.

Warmest regards,

Stan

@9INCHmarketing

The longest and hardest nine inches in marketing is the distance between the brain and the heart of your customer.

2 years, 7 months ago on The 20 songs the Beatles wrote about Social Media engagement

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@samfiorella Thanks Sam. One of my favorite quotes is from Roger Staubach. "There are no traffic jams on the extra mile." The little things can make the biggest difference.

2 years, 7 months ago on 12 Most Unique Examples from The Purple Goldfish Project

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@PaulBiedermann That's it. You and I are going to dine @Besito. #usguys The core product is excellent (guac) and the lagniappe is dreamy.

Best,

Stan

2 years, 7 months ago on 12 Most Unique Examples from The Purple Goldfish Project

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@AmyMccTobin Thanks Amy. I hope it helps. My goal is to try to shift a mindset. Take care of the one in "hand" as opposed to the two in the bush.

2 years, 7 months ago on 12 Most Unique Examples from The Purple Goldfish Project

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@Alesia Medas Thanks Alesia. Great minds think alike. Stayed tuned as I have a book coming out on January 11th designed around this strategy.

Best,

Stan

2 years, 7 months ago on 12 Most Unexpected Reasons Why Marketing is All About the Customer

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Daniel,

Customer Experience as a lie . . . or better yet a myth. Strong words.

I will agree with you on a few salient points:

1. It's not a substitute for the need to have a great product. You can't make chicken salad out of chicken sh*t.

2. It's not a guarantee of success. There are no 'quick fixes'. Good customer experience is a long term commitment, not a campaign.

3. A satisfactory customer experience should be table stakes. It's like the bakers dozen. Nothing special about the 13th bagel. The customer expects it in due course.

Let me respectfully disagree in a few areas:

1. It can move the needle. A recent study in International Journal of Marketing Studies demonstrated that customers who were greeted and given a small gift upon entering a restaurant spent 46% more than the control group. http://www.marketinglagniappe.com/blog/2011/11/20/the-power-of-marketing-g-l-u-e-could-increase-your-sales-by-40-percent/

2. It's correct that people are researching you before they ever walk through the door. They are looking online and they are asking friends / connections for direction. Providing that great experience gives your customers something to talk, yelp, twee, blog and post to Facebook about. The onus is on you as the business to create signature experiences that makes your brand talkable.

3. It can utilized as a strategic differentiator. The majority of consumers do not purchase on price, they buy based on value and maintenance. I believe the question is, "How can I be seen at high value (quality of product / service provided, tangible extras) and low maintenance (easy to deal with, responsive to issues).

Best,

Stan

2 years, 9 months ago on The Great Lie About Customer Experience

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@TedCoine Ted - you are one of the most authentic and giving folks I know on the interwebs. I believe people in life fall into one of two categories: Rope or Twine. Some people unfortunately are weak like wet twine. You my friend are like new rope. And new rope is STRONG.

2 years, 9 months ago on 12 Most Important Aspects of Having 100,000 Followers

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@BruceSallan Thanks Bruce. Hope an idea or two resonated.

2 years, 9 months ago on 12 Most Effective Ways to Stay Connected with Customers and Prospects

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@dbvickery That's a meetup I could get into to. Great idea.

2 years, 9 months ago on 12 Most Effective Ways to Stay Connected with Customers and Prospects

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Great post Jay. Really enjoyed the Taxi Mike's Dining Guide story. It's a tremendous example of a concept I call marketing lagniappe. Doing the little extra for your customer to drive differentiation, increase satisfaction and promote positive word of mouth.

Pleasure meeting you last night at PRSA International.

Best,

Stan

2 years, 10 months ago on Is Youtility the Future of Marketing?

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@YouTernMark@9INCHmarketing Thanks Mark. I'm a big believer in visuals. If a picture is worth a thousand words, that means a one minute video (at 24 frames per second) is worth more than a million. No wonder why YouTube is the second largest search engine in the world.

2 years, 10 months ago on 12 Most Outrageous PR Stunts in the History of Marketing (and Lessons Learned)

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@DixieLil@9INCHmarketing Having a huge budget is not a prerequisite (but I'd be lying if I said it doesn't help). Frozen Grand Central above used volunteers and a bunch of handheld cameras. You can scale almost any idea.

2 years, 10 months ago on 12 Most Outrageous PR Stunts in the History of Marketing (and Lessons Learned)

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Thanks John. Great idea for a second installment. There were a few I really liked that got left off the list. Hope you might have a few examples to offer for Part 2.

2 years, 10 months ago on 12 Most Outrageous PR Stunts in the History of Marketing (and Lessons Learned)

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@BobBurnett1 Agreed Bob. Spot on about exceeding expectations. I believe 'meeting expectations' is the biggest myth in marketing. You either exceed or fall short. Try to meet expectations is like playing 'prevent defense' in football. It only prevents you from doing one thing . . . winning.

2 years, 10 months ago on 12 Most Compelling Ways of Winning the Customer

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@MeghanMBiro Thanks Meghan. I look forward to tuning in next Tuesday at 8 p.m. EST.

2 years, 11 months ago on 12 Most Compelling Ways of Winning the Customer

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@JosephGier True. I missed both airplanes and helicopters. Red Bull is a company that has done a nice job in the air.

2 years, 11 months ago on 12 Most Unexpected Advancements in Mobile Marketing

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Joseph - that program by Tide is called 'Loads of Hope'. Here is a short video:

http://www.youtube.com/user/tidelaundry#p/c/8A27840E21B6E31A/6/GNi0U232wWM

Little things like clean clothes make a big difference.

2 years, 11 months ago on 12 Most Unexpected Advancements in Mobile Marketing

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Thanks Amir. Love your point about probing for pain and solving a business problem. As my friend @LindaIreland is fond of saying, "People don't buy drills . . . they are buying 1/2 inch holes".

3 years ago on 12 Most Unexpected Reasons Why Marketing is All About the Customer

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@westfallonline Thanks Chris. Great point on 'story'. My mantra with lagniappe is that you absolutely need to give that little extra. Provide a framework for story and give your customers something to talk, tweet, blog and Facebook about. cc: @sharlenesones

3 years ago on 12 Most Unexpected Reasons Why Marketing is All About the Customer

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@jeanniecw Thanks Jeannie. Little things can make a big difference. The extras are a beacon. A small sign that demonstrates you care.

3 years ago on 12 Most Impactful Ways You Can Give Little Extras To Enhance Customer Experience

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@DaveKerpen Nice post Dave. Love #7 Surprise & Delight. Leverage the power of the unexpected and doing more than expected.

3 years ago on 12 Most Effective Ways to Be Likeable on Facebook

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@JohnFeskorn Thanks John. Let me know if you come across any good examples to share.

Best,

Stan

3 years ago on 12 Most Impactful Ways You Can Give Little Extras To Enhance Customer Experience

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@samfiorella@dinodogan@SeanMcGinnis

Maybe Sean was caught up in the 'Rise of the Planet of the Apes'. I too feel the image should be more Che than Johnny Bananas.

Extra points for spelling guerrilla right. Most leave off the second r.

Guerrilla is about being unconventional. Assimilating to your environment and making it part of your statement. Engaging the consumer where they live, work and play.

Extra points when the budgets are extremely thin, but a big budget can also work wonders. Here is one of my favorites. It's like music to my ears:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2lXh2n0aPyw

3 years ago on 12 Most Clever Guerrilla Marketing Campaigns

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@danielnewmanUV Thanks Daniel. Good point. Marketing doesn't end once your customer walks through the door or lands on your webpage. That little extra can bridge the hardest nine inches in marketing ... the distance between the head and the heart of your customer.

3 years ago on 12 Most Impactful Ways You Can Give Little Extras To Enhance Customer Experience

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@Natasha_D_G Thanks Natasha. I totally agree. You need to do things to be 'remark'able. Give your customers something to talk, tweet, blog and post to Facebook about.

3 years ago on 12 Most Impactful Ways You Can Give Little Extras To Enhance Customer Experience

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@guykawasaki Insightful stuff as usual. A little lagniappe w/ the Zuckerberg fact. Love it.

3 years ago on 12 Most Enchanting Features of Google+

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Nice post Chris. How about another half dozen of 'disastrous' classics. I'm not admitting that I've used any of these:

- If I told you, "You have a beautiful body. Would you hold it against me?"

- Check the tag in his / her shirt and say, "Just checking to see if it said, MADE IN HEAVEN"

- Dip your finger in your drink, touch his / her shirt and say, "Why don't we go back to my place and get out of these wet clothes.

- [Back in the days of pay phones] Do you have a quarter? My Mom told me call her when I found the woman / man of my dreams

- How do you like your eggs for breakfast? Fertilized?

- Get her attention and motion with your pointing finger to walk over. Once she does say, "I made you come with one finger, imagine what I could do with all five."

Best of luck with your upcoming book.

3 years, 1 month ago on 12 Most Disastrous Pick Up Lines

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@danielnewmanUV

Consistency is table stakes. Do you guarantee the high level each and every time? I love the fact that you reach out personally to follow up.

The crux of marketing lagniappe is trying to offer a little extra that's relevant, unexpected, limited (signature) and sticky.

It's about setting out to create an imbalance. Less transactional and more personable. The little extra is the 'beacon' that demonstrates you care.

Ideally it differentiates you, it reduces attrition and it makes you talkable.

3 years, 1 month ago on 12 Most Amazing Examples of Marketing Lagniappe (You’ve Never Heard of)

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@danielnewmanUV Thanks Daniel. Value is the new black. Leveraging 'surprise and delight' with your current customers via g.l.u.e. How do you go above and beyond at United Visual?

3 years, 1 month ago on 12 Most Amazing Examples of Marketing Lagniappe (You’ve Never Heard of)

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