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Interesting trend. We started with with the telegraph and telephone, both offering relatively personal/one-to-one communications. Then we expanded to one-to-many offerings and ways of managing those. However, today, with Snapchat at the top, we're returning to the roots of the trend ... personal (and more private) communications. --Paul Calento

9 months, 3 weeks ago on Infographic: Social Media Evolution

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All too often it is perceived that information security is someone else's problem, evidenced above by pointing out flaws in password policy. While the point is valid, it is time for us to also encourage individual responsibility. That means we need to stop talking "security" (which is an amorphous concept to many) and focus on the selfish interests of the user ... privacy. --Paul Calento

9 months, 3 weeks ago on Cloud Infographic: Personal Data Security

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Defining "platform" may be the trend-to-watch re: cloud in 2014. Specifically, how cloud computing, integrates with Big Data, mobile and social seamlessly, not just in theory. Perhaps, this will be the enabling technology for the "industrial internet" cited above. --Paul Calento

10 months, 3 weeks ago on Cloud Computing 2014: Five Cloud Trends To Look For

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While there is a need for partners to harvest Big Data, the most important thing, short term, is a compelling use case. As Gartner points out, most people don't know why they're doing it. --Paul Calento

11 months, 3 weeks ago on Cloud Infographic – 5 Ways To Become Extinct As Big Data Evolves

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One first step to building a security posture with the cloud and today's converged infrastructure is that there is little to know privacy. We are insecure. That sets the stage for a proactive stance of Observe --> Orient --> Decide --> and Act. --Paul Calento

1 year ago on Why NSA Revelations Will Be Good For Cloud Security

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49% of attacks = opportunistic. Along the lines of "risk aware culture" mentioned above, another security possibility to consider is the OODA loop. Specifically:  the recurring cycle of observe-orient-decide-act. Risk aware isn't enough. Decisive subsequent and sometimes even proactive action is needed. --Paul Calento

1 year ago on Cloud Infographic: 2013 Cyber Security Intelligence Index

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While the examples above are consumer-focused, the enterprise faces similar and perhaps larger threats. Knowing there's a problem isn't enough. There needs to be a response. One possibility: "disrupt adversaries and manage risk." These criminals are coordinated. Organizations, likewise, need to be in their response. --Paul Calento

1 year ago on Cloud Infographic: Cybercrime

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Different cloud providers provide varying degrees of integrated security (or not). One way of reducing risk is choosing the right tools already integrated with a particular platform. Another way is including the needed security/compliance requirements into SLAs. Yet another approach, likely in conjunction with one or both of the other two, is to utilize existing (traditional IT) best practices.

2 years, 1 month ago on The Risks Of Moving To The Cloud

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Agree with the benefits, but looking objectively only tells part of the story. Outside of ROI, one of my favorite use cases is from Gratifon, which is a company that produces VoIP kiosks that allow customers in developing countries to call anyone in the world for free (ad supported) http://dell.to/PjYtAC. In their case, its not about cost reduction or scalability or flexible working practices (although they probably achieve that), but about a transformative use case that may not be economically viable with a commercial IT model. Sometimes, I think, we look too objectively at the technology. --Paul Calento (http://about.me/paulcalento)

2 years, 2 months ago on Proven Ways To Increase Competitiveness With Cloud Computing

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Cloud is one of those technologies that is powered by inertia. Reminded of a comment by Geva Perry at a cloud computing event earlier in the year. He pointed out that many of the naysayers in cloud surveys are not the people that make decisions about purchasing actually cloud solutions. As for security, there are arguably advantages/incentives to a commercial service offering security. Most importantly, for every detractor, there are compelling case studies. --Paul Calento http://about.me/paul_calento

2 years, 2 months ago on Reasons Why Cloud Computing Remains Unpopular Past 2012

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@sarojkar

Re: redirection. Almost too easy to armchair quarterback the transition to cloud. As suggested above, Federal IT's $5.5 Billion savings looks a bit of a long tail ... initial, near immediate savings followed by a slower curve. Rating this against potential almost isn't fair. The transition to cloud needs to be compared with other historical modernization programs, not potential. About a year ago, HP's Judy Redman (http://bit.ly/KoFZIE) pointed out some takeaways/best practices from "Cloud First’. Redman suggests real lasting value might be in its greater objective to implement a massive mind shift in how IT is viewed. The move to public/private/hybrid/converged cloud services is an example of this trend.  Also, criticizing cloud budget savings isn’t unique to the US. There’s a similar debate going on in the UK (see Cloud Tech News http://bit.ly/JvPoTU) --Paul Calento http://bit.ly/paul_calento

 

2 years, 6 months ago on Is The Federal Government Moving Fast Enough On Cloud Computing?

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Reminded of Christian Verstraete's (HP) "... little cloud cheat sheet" http://bit.ly/JCgDNe which identifies some questions to ask when considering the public cloud, which inevitably is at least some part of a likely public/private/hybrid/converged cloud infrastructure.

 

Questions to ask, which parallel many of the ("not so good news") items above, include: Where is the service delivered from?; Who is involved in delivering the service?; Where is the data located?; How can I get the data back in case of decommissioning of the service?; Who owns the data while it is used by the service?; What security processes & procedures are in place?; What responsibility is the service provider taking?; How are you kept informed in case of issues?; What privacy policies is the service provider subscribing to and how do they manages the user information?; What happens if your service provider is acquired or goes bankrupt?

 

--Paul Calento http://bit.ly/paul_calento

 

2 years, 6 months ago on Is My Public Cloud Too Public? Part 3

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Data sovereignty is a big issue complicated by the cloud, both from a regulatory and enterprise security example (see related Enterprise CIO Forum article (http://bit.ly/wMaW8Z). There's a related conversation to this taking place on the LinkedIn Cloud Advisors group (http://lnkd.in/7ZauQH). It started as a discussion about global taxation in the cloud, but has expanded to cover the data sovereignty issue.

 

--Paul Calento http://bit.ly/paul_calento

2 years, 6 months ago on Cloud Computing May Open Up Firms To Hundreds Of Millions In Fines

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There's a distinction between wanting standards (probably near universal agreement) and requiring use of actual use of standards from your partners (not always the case).  Taking an inventory of current cloud projects may yield some surprising results. Key questions to ask: Is there a myriad of cloud projects? Are they synergistic? Is there unified management? Security? Interoperability? Lock-in? Now the case for standards is clear. Likewise, for new cloud projects, you need to ask, what do I think this project is going to look like in 2 to 5 years? Will I want to make changes? What is the solution? Cloud is maturing and a Converged Cloud approach is acknowledgement of the changing needs of the cloud-driven enterprise. --Paul Calento http://bit.ly/paul_calento

2 years, 6 months ago on Demand For Standards—Interoperability To Fuel Converged Cloud Growth

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 @HumayunShahid Game-changer? Yes. What seems lacking in the move to cloud is the equivalent of the children's "Choose Your Own Adventure" books for cloud services and deployment or as Chris Purcell (HP) suggests a recipe book http://bit.ly/JjAFau. For many, government and business alike, they're running blind and lack of skills inhibits. Perhaps it will even erase some of the $5.5B in gains.

2 years, 6 months ago on Research Report: Feds Rejoice The Cloud Way, With $5 bn In Annual Savings

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Government agencies and private sector businesses face many of the same challenges, including barriers to interoperability, consistent security policies, centralized management and oversight. Some are baked in to the existing process (legislated) and others are institutionally limiting the issue. Seems like the answer is to use a common flexible platform(s) across a myriad of public, private and traditional IT resources, rather than let each group choose for themselves. For many, lack of cloud computing foresight results in unneeded, unwanted lock-in and security issues, rather than a broader working hybrid or converged cloud approach. I'm not sure that government (Federal IT in particular) is dragging its feet). The $5.5 Billion in Federal IT cost savings, reported by CloudTweaks http://bit.ly/Itku98 seems significant and relatively quick to me. The key, long term is how those security, manageability and interoperability issues are measured. --Paul Calento http://bit.ly/paul_calento

2 years, 6 months ago on The Government And The Cloud: Defining The Relationship

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Yes, I get the humor, but there is an undeniable marketing connection with cloud computing. That's not a bad thing. It gets organizations excited about IT again, whether about public, private, hybrid, converged cloud flavors, etc. Yes, the "cloud" term is amorphous, but that's what makes it so compelling to tech pros and biz execs alike. Of course, the origins of the cloud term are hotly debated. According to the Wikipedia entry (http://bit.ly/IZoKO6), "The term "cloud" is used as a metaphor for the Internet, based on the cloud drawing used in the past to represent the telephone network, and later to depict the Internet in computer network diagrams as an abstraction of the underlying infrastructure it represents...," while later adding, "... The underlying concept of cloud computing dates back to the 1960s, when John McCarthy opined that "computation may someday be organised as a public utility."

 

Also, just read a blog from Christian Verstraete, HP Chief Cloud Technologist referencing a 1982 slide from Joel Birnbaum (http://bit.ly/IuNeU2), then head of HP Labs. Verstraete notes "...I actually managed to find one of his slides, dated from the early-to-mind 90’s back on the Internet. He talked about computer appliances and computer utilities. Change the name to cloud and his timing is close."

 

But, origins may be less important. And keep the humor coming. Taking something too seriously is the mark of ESTABLISHED TECHNOLOGY. I'd argue that when the humor stops, so does innovation and x-factor thinking. --Paul Calento (http://bit.ly/paul_calento)

2 years, 6 months ago on Is Cloud Computing A Lunch Break Creation?

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This is more than a federal IT story ... this is validation and inspiration for business. Rationale: If the government can do it, so can we ... and better. This only adds to the best practices that Cloud First has brought to the private sector. As HP's Judy Redman (http://bit.ly/KoFZIE), "Cloud First’s’ real lasting value might be in its greater objective to implement a massive mind shift in how the Federal government views IT.  It’s very similar to our philosophy that says today’s CIO’s must shift from being service providers to becoming service brokers."

 

--Paul Calento (http://bit.ly/paul_calento)

2 years, 6 months ago on Research Report: Feds Rejoice The Cloud Way, With $5 bn In Annual Savings

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We haven't reached the cloud services equivalent of suburban mall sprawl, but we're getting close. Today's cloud can quickly resemble a town without building codes. One of the challenges with managing the cloud is a false sense of security. There's likely more cloud services already in place than you realize. They've been added through a combination of business-driven projects, credit card-driven pilots and (official) IT driven projects. How do you tie them together? Converged cloud (http://bit.ly/JNr9j1) is an opportunity to not only solve an org's management, security and visibility problems, but also provide a platform for future cloud projects. --Paul Calento http://bit.ly/paul_calento

2 years, 7 months ago on Are You Overwhelmed By The Number Of Cloud Services To Manage?

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For many, integrated management remains a goal, not a reality. What's needed is what a Christian Verstraete (HP) blog terms an "... integrated management and security framework ensuring end-to-end management and security of each service instance." http://bit.ly/IEnccM Ideally (as noted), we need the same tools, whether a public, private or hybrid / converged cloud instance. Compounding the challenge is that many orgs address cloud management AFTER they deploy a number of instances, not before or in parallel. --Paul Calento http://bit.ly/paul_calento

2 years, 7 months ago on Cloud Management And The New Paradigm Of Computing

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Cloud momentum reminds me of the server virtualization push a few years back, which, in my opinion, helped support a hardware upgrade cycle during a recession. But studies like this may (even) under-represent the cloud opportunity. Why? Two trends: #1 LOB (non-IT/shadow IT) is also implementing cloud (via public cloud services); #2 Inevitable push to expand beyond private cloud to the public cloud and back ... i.e. hybrid cloud / (what HP calls) Converged Cloud / likely many other monikers, as well. --Paul Calento http://bit.ly/paul_calento

2 years, 7 months ago on Survey Results: Whooping One-Third Of IT Budget Dedicated To Cloud Computing

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A also participated in the #convcloud Twitter chat last Thursday. There needs to be a core foundation for cloud and open solutions/initiatives like OpenStack and KVM can be central components to build upon (see GigaOm article http://bit.ly/I3iBBx) Key to the cloud standards debate ... and HP Converged Cloud opportunity you describe above ... is an understanding that an organization's needs of today are different than tomorrow's. As cloud skills develop, one inevitably sees the value in moving between public and private clouds. For standards to take hold, they need to be pragmatic. Quickening maturity of the cloud is helping make that happen. --Paul Calento http://bit.ly/paul_calento

2 years, 7 months ago on “Waiting For Cloud Standards Is Like Waiting For Godot”

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There's more to the "eat our own dogfood" comment (http://ow.ly/6qw1n) than just running software internally that's sold to customers. Many companies share best practices with their customers (based on watching the larger market, not necessary from themselves) that they don't follow through with on their own.That's lost opportunity.

--Paul Calento (http://bit.ly/paul_calento) (Note: I work on projects sponsored by Enterprise CIO Forum and HP Instant-On Enterprise)

3 years, 2 months ago on SAIC - eating their own dog food

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A common theme across many orgs is that IT agility is taking on new urgency (http://bit.ly/ct1amlvt1) ... and you won't know what the directives are if you're checking your email in the meeting talking about it.

But in discussing the issue more broadly, I think the trap many of us fall into is thinking that all CIOs, including their responsibilities and capabilities, are equal. They're not. Much like a CEO of a start-up may have more in common with a big company's line-of-business manager, CIOs may also be the same. When we talk about CIOs having a seat at the table, we're really talking about the one's who deserve it. Joel Dobbs' point is, nevertheless, well taken.

--Paul Calento (http://bit.ly/paul_calento)

(note: I work on projects sponsored by Enterprise CIO Forum and HP)

3 years, 3 months ago on Are CIO's missing the "O"?

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Application of technology (which is my definition of "innovation" - http://bit.ly/jLaEB0), not the technology itself is the differentiator. This is IT's greatest strength.

I fear, however, that Martin's well thought out position can be misinterpreted and used by many managers to inhibit IT's role in the consumerization era. While there's a lot of discussion about the role of the CFO in IT budgeting/decisions/etc., you make not of "stealth IT"... the role sales and functional business managers have on IT. By taking a "know your role" stance, these projects, if successful, undermine IT, who's predisposition and analytical nature may be to play by the rules.

--Paul Calento (http://bit.ly/paul_calento)

(note: I work on projects sponsored by Enterprise CIO Forum and HP)

3 years, 3 months ago on Available does not equal best

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Cloud: Evolution or revolution? Regardless, cloud is an enterprise inevitability. Commodity technologies. Consumption-based costing. Emphasis on results over how you get there.

As for debates, I'm intrigued by another ... whether the cloud is a version of outsourcing (or not) - http://bit.ly/iWZupT - given the implications on partners, billing and management. We'll probably end up with the same answer as the evolution vs. revolution issue - YES.

--Paul Calento (http://bit.ly/paul_calento)

(note: I work on projects sponsored by Enterprise CIO Forum and HP)

3 years, 4 months ago on Cloud Computing - Evolution? Revolution? Yes.

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The CIO position started gaining momentum in the late 80's as a way for the business to rationalize IT. The first issue of CIO Magazine in 1987 may surprise many by its business focus - http://ow.ly/5nGN3). Twenty five years later, as a result of the position's maturity in the organization and enabling technologies in the cloud, its evolving from simple management to "Instant-On" transformation. While I'd agree with Paul Muller that our next job probably isn't in IT (http://bit.ly/jdKKUW), I'd argue the CIO position has always been that way.

--Paul Calento (http://bit.ly/paul_calento)

(note: I work on projects sponsored by Enterprise CIO Forum and HP)

3 years, 5 months ago on Is the CIO Role disappearing?

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