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I am curious how Lake shoes are known to fit, relative to others like Specialized, Sidi, and Shimano. And, would those "knowns" be thrown out the window since the lower and insole can be heat molded specifically to an individual's foot?

1 year, 3 months ago on Lake Cycling to Release Cyclocross-Specific MX331 Shoe

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There have been Crusade races at McMenamins Edgefield previously, it's just been more than a decade. Late 90's?

2 years, 8 months ago on Edgefield Pedalers at the Poor Farm Cyclocross

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@EricMorgan No rim strip, single layer of yellow tape. Stock wheel set, the heaviest one that is a little over 1400 g.

2 years, 8 months ago on Going Tubeless for Cyclocross – Avoiding the Burp, Choosing the Best Tires, and a DIY System (Updated, Part III)

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@cyclocross I spoke with Don K. last weekend at the Boulder UCI races. He said that they are still struggling with getting the mold process dialed to where they can ensure a properly sized tire casing that falls within the 33 mm rule. The first run was designed to be 32.5 and it came out as 28, then they did another round of mold making with a goal of 33.5 and it turned out as 34-34.5 mm !? I guess it is quite difficult to work with such tight tolerances the UCI has mandated in manufacturing. Even the high-end tubulars of other brands struggle with this between batches.

2 years, 9 months ago on Going Tubeless for Cyclocross – Avoiding the Burp, Choosing the Best Tires, and a DIY System (Updated, Part III)

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@cyclocross I measured mine on the 340 rim, but I don't see how the rim width would change the amount of tire material (lay the tire flat and measure bead to bead) there is to form into a cross-sectional volume. Since the 29er rim is slightly wider, the tire would not become narrower after inflating. All it will do is widen the cross section of the tire volume where the bead hits the rim, effectively allowing more air volume at a given pressure.

The UCI officials are interpreting the rule in a positive way, to me. As long as they can shove the measurement tool on the tire, it seems to be allowed. The relative ease of this depends on if the tire is dry or wet (friction) and the pressure it is inflated to. With a Tufo Cubis 32 tubular, the tool will slip on very cleanly w/o friction. It is a true 32mm. The tool will still fit over a 34-35 mm Stans Raven tire, even though it's clearly too big. I get the impression that the officials realize the rule is stupid, it's too vague to enforce, and feels awkward to tell an elite rider his tire is "too fat" while the top pros on the front line are riding the same brand and model of tire (Clement PDX).

2 years, 9 months ago on Going Tubeless for Cyclocross – Avoiding the Burp, Choosing the Best Tires, and a DIY System (Updated, Part III)

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The stans rims have a psi rating and you were clearly exceeding it at 85psi (I think they are like 50-55psi). You don't need to air the tires up more than 40-50 when getting them seated. Yes, the soap helps it pop into place. I don't get as much of a "pop" sound with the Hutchinsons when I tried them a few years ago (non-ust, first generation). At the lower end of that pressure range, you can pry the tire back/forth after inflating and spin it at the hub to see if it is seated consistently, or if not, it will slip into place. You can also look at the relative location of the mold line at the outer bead/sidewall area and how it parallels the rim. That will indicate it is seated. You don't over-inflate the tire to "hope" it will go into place. Normal riding pressure for CX racing is 30-40 and as you ride, the tire will shift and flex a little, also helping it to settle into position. There is no need to use glue at the bead (as others have suggested) or rim strips as the Alpha 340 is already pretty shallow, but if you absolutely need to (if you are using a loose tire), then give it a shot. I've found that Michelins and Hutchinsons are the tightest.

2 years, 9 months ago on Going Tubeless for Cyclocross – Avoiding the Burp, Choosing the Best Tires, and a DIY System (Updated, Part III)

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@hero_snow No problem. The Jets worked just as well for me as the Mud2's, and even better were the Stan's Raven's. Of those three semi-slick treads, I felt the LAS was the best due to the edge knobs.

2 years, 9 months ago on Going Tubeless for Cyclocross – Avoiding the Burp, Choosing the Best Tires, and a DIY System (Updated, Part III)

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@hero_snow You can't go wrong with a Michelin Mud2. They are a slightly tighter fit than what I'm using in the UCI elite races, which is the Clement PDX and LAS tires. They are both proving to be reliable for me on the 340 rims at 30-34 psi. I'm 172lbs. I was bombing past riders last weekend in Boulder who were using tubulars in the most nasty mud sections. Excellent edge knobs and open tread.

The 15 psi pry test suggests that the Michelins are very slightly better at resisting burping, but both tires are pretty reliable at normal racing pressures, in my experience.

2 years, 9 months ago on Going Tubeless for Cyclocross – Avoiding the Burp, Choosing the Best Tires, and a DIY System (Updated, Part III)

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Have you tried using an air compressor with your valve stem cores removed? Also soapy bead?

2 years, 9 months ago on Going Tubeless for Cyclocross – Avoiding the Burp, Choosing the Best Tires, and a DIY System (Updated, Part III)

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Adding to the PDX Clement tire subject... I typically use an air compressor, removable valve stem core, stans sealant, and soapy bead when I pop up my tubeless clincher tires into place. This makes it a no-brainer.

The new Clements did not inflate for me right away. I initially cast them aside thinking they were too loose and not a good tubeless option. I instead mounted them onto another rim w/ a tube inflated. After a day of stretching (the tires were packaged previously in a folded state), I tried it again w/ the air compressor... voilla! No issues inflating whatsoever.

The Clements are looser at the bead than a Michelin Mud2, but tighter than several other tires I've tried. Tighter fit is better for sure. With the pry test, I could get some burp-spits of sealant w/ the Clements, but nothing w/ the Mud2's. Folding and prying the tire flat against the rim back and forth all the way around the circumfrence of the tire, there were numerous little spits. It all added up to only 1-2 psi of pressure loss.

After a few rounds of the standard "shake-and-lay-flat", I'm not able to get any further spitting during the pry test. I do that at 15-20 psi, which emulates the lateral forces I'd be putting on a tire if I folded it all the way to the rim w/ too low of pressure. Doing this procedure can help you to gain confidence in the reliability and structural soundness of the tubeless setup - good for the mind. A few follow up test rides will confirm it and you can proceed, worry-free!

28-35psi is a pretty reliable pressure to work with using a tubeless clincher.

2 years, 9 months ago on Going Tubeless for Cyclocross – Avoiding the Burp, Choosing the Best Tires, and a DIY System (Updated, Part III)

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I would love to see an additional measurement added to this list, which identifies which of the "tubeless compatible with Stans rims" tires are compatible with the UCI 33mm or less rule!

Too wide:

Michi Mud2

Clement LAS

Stans Raven

2 years, 9 months ago on Going Tubeless for Cyclocross – Avoiding the Burp, Choosing the Best Tires, and a DIY System (Updated, Part III)

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What are the file tread tires shown on some of the photos (Furley)?

3 years ago on New Product Spotlight: Raleigh’s 2012 Cyclocross Line Expands to Eight Models

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I was one of the human test subjects in this study during the summer of 2009. Near the end of the heat acclimation period, I won my first pro mtb race, an 8 hour endurance event which took place in 90+ degree temps.

3 years, 1 month ago on Training Tuesdays: Heat Training for Dramatic Improvements in Hot and Cold Weather Performance

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