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Plain and simple: a business becomes a brand when it knows what it believes. Its belief is infused into everything it does. As you say, transcendence is key.

6 months, 3 weeks ago on Conversation @ http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/231292

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 @lulugrimm agreed, Arik is a great mentor. He helped me out in the past too. You can never have enough of them.

1 year, 2 months ago on Then and Now: 16 digital marketers whose careers have skyrocketed since 2008

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Great post, Anthony. I truly think the biggest advantage LinkedIn has is a purpose. As more content gets pushed in social networks, the vision for those networks gets lost because consumers define it. LinkedIn, as you say, allows one to control the message - thus keeping the vision alive. I know I'm jumping in late here, but I thoroughly enjoyed reading your perspective and had to comment. I'm in full agreement.

2 years, 4 months ago on 5 Reasons Linkedin is Boring in a Good Way

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@ginidietrich Bah, I mean wheel!

2 years, 9 months ago on Content Strategist vs. Content Analyst

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@hackmanj@ginidietrich Fantastic. Yes, it is!

2 years, 9 months ago on Content Strategist vs. Content Analyst

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@ginidietrich@hackmanj Very kind of you. Can you send me the link to the podcast. I'll promote!

2 years, 9 months ago on Content Strategist vs. Content Analyst

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@ginidietrich Thanks, Gini again for the opportunity. I'd just like people to be more mindful of how it's better to not always jump the gun with sharing content. Let's be smarter, more ahead of the curve and not "regurgitate" the well ;)

2 years, 9 months ago on Content Strategist vs. Content Analyst

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@JoeCardillo@Lisa Gerber@KenMueller The role of content analyst is to not just look at content for the sake of pass-along but rather investigate to see if the pass-along is based on credible, accurate, and most importantly, non-hasty claims. If it's shared with haste, it likely needs some investigation. And we're not just talking about credible content, we're talking about GOOD content -- the stuff that's worth a read because it outlasts the frenzy it first received on the social Web. My bigger argument here is to not act quickly in an effort to share news because in this micro world of content tidbits, news changes on a dime. That's something traditional media is constantly trying to stay ahead of. No one can really. We all just need to wait and see where the story goes...

2 years, 9 months ago on Content Strategist vs. Content Analyst

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Jay, great insight into a bigger problem with how PRs conduct blogger outreach (and lol to the point about being row no. XX on a social media bloggers list!). I in fact had a back-and-forth with an author of a post saying that bloggers need to inform firms, not the other way around (found at this link: http://prbreakfastclub.com/2011/09/13/could-conagra-happen-to-you/). At our agency, we have always baked relationship-building into a plan and have informed clients that hours were going to be put toward that, NOT placement. Any firm who is offering results now is BS-ing the client. Sure, there may be an impression here, a like there. BUT A lot more value is found in approaching this as a continuum.

2 years, 11 months ago on Blogger Outreach Changes the PR Timeline Forever

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Jay,

Thanks for this post. I only knew of this incident from seeing it first on Olivier's blog. I think you hit on a great point here. We all have different ways we operate in social networks, whether it is to make surface friends or real friends, and sometimes those surface friends turn into real friends... or so we think. And some come to social networks with a strategy to get to know people. It was obvious, from many stories I read about Trey's condition, because I wanted to grab context not just assume things, that Trey was battling a long episode of darkness. It seems he went to the elders at this church, and they couldn't do anything and he felt judged by them for feeling a certain way. It's also shocking to hear how many times he reached out to people in social media to no avail in overcoming his "demons." That said, the warning signs were there and no one spoke up. This is definitely a wake-up call to the social media community -- and the church-- that the extensions of people's lives aren't always pretty, fun, kool-aidish, Jesus-high, so be prepared when you cross paths with someone who needs help.

2 years, 12 months ago on Social Media, Pretend Friends, and the Lie of False Intimacy

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Drooling over this post - thanks, Jay!

3 years ago on 5 Reasons Social Media Measurement is Making You Lie to Yourself

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Hi Elizabeth,

Think I might be late to the game on this, but if not, here it goes:

I think all of this "work" should start with passion for researching the company, its mission, its clients, key connections in social networks, etc. Then it's not really about work as much as it is about truly wanting to work somewhere. You're bringing up some key points for prospects to do their due diligence, but I think you're giving secrets away :). I'd like people to just have the common sense of doing this stuff now that social interactions and activity have transcended human resources and for-hire circles.

As for thank you notes, I have yet to see one that truly cites specific examples from discussions in the interview. More broader generalities are shared and it seems very scripted/boilerplate. Awesome to hear that is not always the case, as your shared experience shows.

3 years, 2 months ago on 6 Ways to Show You Give a Damn in a Job Interview

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Kary and all,

Here's some good perspective from Jay Baer on Twitter having a stickiness problem. Think it's definitely applicable to what we're all realizing http://www.convinceandconvert.com/twitter/the-reality-of-competition-in-a-maturing-social-marketplace/ (Start the video at 1:32 and watch until 3:05)

3 years, 2 months ago on Three Reasons Twitter Is Beginning to Suck

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Kary,

The study you cited really shows what it's always been. Twitter has always owned about 4-8% of people's attention, but it's never built beyond that -- unless of course, we're talking in the context of breaking news. Sadly, that can't offer consistent attention, as news by definition, is unpredictable and always-changing. I guess we're not as ADD as I originally thought.

I love the fact that you shared this, as I think that a lot of people are reaching their tweeting point. It's about the noise; it's too much and it's making it more important to couple Twitter communications with traditional intro/outreach methods, such as sending an e-mail to get someone's attention.

Here's the rule of thumb for all moving forward: do something different and see if that works. If so, you've got an effective relationship strategy that will vary from person to person. I can guarantee it.

3 years, 2 months ago on Three Reasons Twitter Is Beginning to Suck

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